How to Boost Your Immune System with Wakame Seaweed

How to Boost Your Immune System with Wakame Seaweed
4.74 (94.88%) 43 votes

Eating seaweed salad may boost the efficacy of vaccinations and help treat cold sores, herpes, Epstein-Barr virus, and shingles.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Billions of pounds of seaweed are harvested each year, the “consumption of [which] has been linked to a lower incidence of chronic diseases,” both physical and mental. For example, women who eat more seaweed during pregnancy appear to be less depressed, and have less seasonal allergy symptoms.

But, the problem with these cross-sectional, correlational studies is that you can’t prove cause and effect. Maybe seaweed consumption is just an indicator that they’re following “traditional Japanese dietary customs” in general, which have lots of different aspects that could protect against disease. To know for sure if seaweed could modulate immune function, you have to put it to the test.

So, typically, researchers start out like this: in vitro (meaning, like, in a test tube), which makes for quicker, cheaper, easier experiments. Take eight different types of seaweed, and basically make some seaweed tea you can drip on human immune system cells in a petri dish.

It was studies like these that showed that the seaweed wakame, which is what you find in seaweed salad, can quadruple the replication potential of T cells, which are an important part of our immune defense against viruses like herpes simplex virus. Yeah, but no one actually tried giving seaweed to people with herpes, until this study.

They gave people suffering from various herpes infections about two grams a day of pure powdered wakame, which is equivalent to about a quarter-cup of seaweed salad. And, “[a]ll fifteen patients with active Herpetic viral infections experienced significant lessening or disappearance of symptoms.” This included herpes virus 1, the cause of oral herpes, which causes cold sores; herpes virus 2, which causes genital herpes; herpes virus 4, also known as Epstein-Barr virus, which causes mono; and herpes 3, which causes shingles and chicken pox. There was no control group, though—but with no downsides, why not give it a try? Anyway, if you’re on a date, and they order seaweed salad, you might want to ask them about their history.

Researchers also found that wakame boosted antibody production. So, might it be useful to boost the efficacy of vaccines? The elderly are particularly vulnerable to suffering and dying from influenza. Now, the flu vaccine can help, but ironically, the elderly are less likely to benefit, because immune function tends to decline as we get older.

So, they took 70 volunteers over the age 60. This is the level of antibodies they had against a flu virus at baseline. And, what you’re looking for in a vaccination is to get a two-and-a-half fold response. So, we’d like to see this get up to at least 25 to consider it an effective response. But, they only got up to here. Give them some wakame extract every day, though, for a month before the vaccination, and they jumped up to here. They used an extract rather than the real thing, because they needed to put it into a pill, so they could perform this randomized, placebo-controlled study—it’s kinda hard to make a convincing placebo seaweed salad.

“It is hoped that the popular seaweeds eaten daily in Japan, though almost unknown” everywhere else outside of Japanese restaurants, will start to be more widely “consumed…for possible immunopotentiation [boosting immunity] and for attenuating the burden of infectious diseases in the elderly.”

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: mroach via flickr. Image has been modified.

Video credit: Tyler McReynolds, Teetotalin LLC.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Billions of pounds of seaweed are harvested each year, the “consumption of [which] has been linked to a lower incidence of chronic diseases,” both physical and mental. For example, women who eat more seaweed during pregnancy appear to be less depressed, and have less seasonal allergy symptoms.

But, the problem with these cross-sectional, correlational studies is that you can’t prove cause and effect. Maybe seaweed consumption is just an indicator that they’re following “traditional Japanese dietary customs” in general, which have lots of different aspects that could protect against disease. To know for sure if seaweed could modulate immune function, you have to put it to the test.

So, typically, researchers start out like this: in vitro (meaning, like, in a test tube), which makes for quicker, cheaper, easier experiments. Take eight different types of seaweed, and basically make some seaweed tea you can drip on human immune system cells in a petri dish.

It was studies like these that showed that the seaweed wakame, which is what you find in seaweed salad, can quadruple the replication potential of T cells, which are an important part of our immune defense against viruses like herpes simplex virus. Yeah, but no one actually tried giving seaweed to people with herpes, until this study.

They gave people suffering from various herpes infections about two grams a day of pure powdered wakame, which is equivalent to about a quarter-cup of seaweed salad. And, “[a]ll fifteen patients with active Herpetic viral infections experienced significant lessening or disappearance of symptoms.” This included herpes virus 1, the cause of oral herpes, which causes cold sores; herpes virus 2, which causes genital herpes; herpes virus 4, also known as Epstein-Barr virus, which causes mono; and herpes 3, which causes shingles and chicken pox. There was no control group, though—but with no downsides, why not give it a try? Anyway, if you’re on a date, and they order seaweed salad, you might want to ask them about their history.

Researchers also found that wakame boosted antibody production. So, might it be useful to boost the efficacy of vaccines? The elderly are particularly vulnerable to suffering and dying from influenza. Now, the flu vaccine can help, but ironically, the elderly are less likely to benefit, because immune function tends to decline as we get older.

So, they took 70 volunteers over the age 60. This is the level of antibodies they had against a flu virus at baseline. And, what you’re looking for in a vaccination is to get a two-and-a-half fold response. So, we’d like to see this get up to at least 25 to consider it an effective response. But, they only got up to here. Give them some wakame extract every day, though, for a month before the vaccination, and they jumped up to here. They used an extract rather than the real thing, because they needed to put it into a pill, so they could perform this randomized, placebo-controlled study—it’s kinda hard to make a convincing placebo seaweed salad.

“It is hoped that the popular seaweeds eaten daily in Japan, though almost unknown” everywhere else outside of Japanese restaurants, will start to be more widely “consumed…for possible immunopotentiation [boosting immunity] and for attenuating the burden of infectious diseases in the elderly.”

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: mroach via flickr. Image has been modified.

Video credit: Tyler McReynolds, Teetotalin LLC.

Doctor's Note

What else can seaweed salad do (other than taste yummy)?  See Wakame Seaweed Salad May Lower Blood Pressure.

In general, sea vegetables are good sources of iodine (see Iodine Supplements Before, During, & After Pregnancy), and may be one reason Japanese women have historically had such low rates of breast cancer (see Which Seaweed is Most Protective Against Breast Cancer?).

What else can we do to boost our immunity? Check out:

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

99 responses to “How to Boost Your Immune System with Wakame Seaweed

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    1. A quick Google search shows that a single serving of wakame seaweed typically has around 87mg of sodium or about 3% daily value. So it’s not a huge amount by any standard and it’s from a whole plant foods source. Dine away!

      Keep in mind that extracts and supplements aren’t typically as effective as their claims would have you think and that you would be losing out on hundreds or thousands of phytonutrients in an extract.https://nutritionfacts.org/video/some-dietary-supplements-may-be-more-than-a-waste-of-money/




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      1. Thanks for the response Ryan, I had done a quick Google and saw 100g of Wakame had 872 mg sodium, didn’t realize a serving was only 10 grams.




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      2. I live in Japan and we have a lots of delicious sea weeds in our diet .
        But since Fukushima melt down and leakage of contaminated radioactive water into the ocean I wonder if sea weeds are radioactifs .all the pacific is now contaminated .
        A real dilemma so I eat much less sea weeds now .




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        1. Hara, I believe that is a real concern, especially as the radioactive markers seem to be getting higher and higher from Fukushima and not lower. There are others but this seems to be a decent, balanced report: http://livingsafe.com.au/sushi-seaweed-and-fukushima-radiation/ To bottom line it, yes, it seems to be a concern and as always especially for children. The recommendation is to source seaweeds from clean sources, of which some are listed in the piece.




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  1. A little off topic from today’s video … I hope the below doesn’t sound too “corny” but I thought that Thea deserved some kind of tribute for all her years of dedicated volunteer work on the website. She has had a profound positive impact on my health and her expert personal relations and communications skills have set a high standard for us all to look up to. To our dear friend Thea:

    Ode To Thea
    We once knew a lady, her voice was so sweet
    She would greet us each day,
    and we looked forward to the treat.
    We listened to her proudly, but now she is gone
    Gone with the wisdom she’s given us for so long.

    When the website first started, we stole her away
    From her job and her family, though close did they stay.
    Each one of them suffering from the loss of her time
    But she loved to guide us, and help keep us in line.

    We all looked forward to her posts every day
    Showing us the light when we started to stray.
    When the arguments got heated, she would always step in
    And with her calmness and wisdom, we ended up friends.

    But the website started changing before our very eyes
    Gone was the simplicity and no one heard our cries.
    In the end, our sanity we had to protect
    So the video portion we decided to neglect.

    We took for granted that she would always be here
    Gracing the website with her lovely cheer
    Noticing not that she was slipping away
    We assumed she’d be with us every single day.

    We screamed and we shouted for the old website to come back
    But in the web developers’ armor there was never a crack
    As the days went by, her frustrations grew and grew
    Her patience was exhausted and she finally withdrew

    And so it did happen, like it could have been foreseen
    She resigned from the website to move on to other things
    We think of her often and hope that wherever she went
    They will be fully aware of how precious she is!




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    1. Oh – I didn’t realise Thea was leaving. That’s disappointing. I’ve always looked out for Thea’s contributions in the comment threads as she is so knowledgeable & helpful & offers such practical tips. Thank you Thea. This is my first ever comment in over 3 years of being an avid follower but I had to offer my gratitude!




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    2. OH Hal,

      Thank you very much for putting into sweet words our fondness for “our” treasured Thea! We miss you, Thea. I hope the armored and so much less personal web masters will forward you our love and appreciation!




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  2. I wonder if other sea veg’s help too. Like Nori, Dulse, Kombu or Arame??? I throw kombu into my veg soup stock to get a bit more umami flavor and dulse in my salads…

    m




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    1. I add Kombu to my pressure cooker when I cook beans and then use the liquid in soups. Just curious if this a good idea, or if there is some risk of getting too much iodine or something.




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        1. I should have said that those amounts could ,”exceed the safe upper limit of iodine intake”. And toxicity was seen in people ingesting the product.




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  3. My concern with eating any kind of seaweed is pollution. Where in the world are oceans no longer polluted?

    Hmmm. Wakame – that kinda sounds Japanese. I wonder if it glows in the dark.




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    1. Is the ocean more polluted than the land? I don’t know…. I was just reading in our NFacts dot org community commentary about tires disintegrating, for example, and going out into our air–only to land in our gardens? Why would sea vegetables be any more dangerous than land vegetables. Our whole earth is polluted.




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    2. Thanks for your comment Richard.

      Indeed, seaweed pollution is a concern (see here). According to Natural News Labs, wakame from New Zealand is the cleanest (see here) and it may be because it is farmed under controlled conditions. However, I admit that this may not be a reliable source of information and it would be better to have scientific publication on the topic about New Zealand seaweed.

      Hope this answer helps.




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    1. Your comment triggered a thought… if the concern about vaccines is mercury or something akin, would taking activated charcoal beforehand mitigate the danger?

      Activated charcoal is touted to latch on to heavy metals and other contaminants and escort them safely from the body. (Sorry, I don’t have a link.)




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      1. I learned from a pharmacist that the influenza vaccine comes in two packages – an individual-dose syringe and a 4-pack bottle, from which multiple injections may be drawn. The latter source usually has a preservative, thymerosal, while the former does not. If you ask your physician, he/she may have the individual doses that do not have thymerosal (25 micrograms of Hg in a dose).

        I always ask for the single dose package when I get hit up.




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  4. This reminds me of John Hopkins Lupus center, highly recommending that one eliminates
    garlic from the diet, as it can cause immune system reaction in some. Same goes with
    Echinacea. They say to avoid it.

    Maybe Seaweed is a way around this.




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    1. Ask Dr McDougall. He’s very good about answering emails, and he has a number of patients who have had excellent results with Lupus. drmcdougall.com




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  5. One thing to keep in mind is that the majority of wakame in seaweed salads is artificially colored, as in the preview picture for this video. In nature, the plant is closer to a shade of light brown than bright green.




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    1. Of course it does! As the old adage goes, “you pays your money and you takes your choice.”
      Let’s face it, we live in a polluted world. Almost every ‘solution’ is going to have a downside to it.
      Recent example: I thought buying locally from neighborhood organic gardens here in NYC would be the best way to go — until someone showed me an article detailing how city soils are heavily polluted with lead and cadmium from cars and bus exhaust that deposts onto the soil and the plants take up from the air and soil.




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      1. I buy Dulse from Maine Coast Sea Vegetables. It wouldn’t have the radiation concern from Fukushima, and it is recommended by Anthony William for those who are fans of the Medical Medium. It is just dried whole seaweed, no extracts or other weird contents.
        John S




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  6. well I have an underactive thyroid would eating seaweed help or can you get it in tablet form .How much seaweed can l consume a day or week.Will be happy to hear from you.Thanks Lorna




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  7. A couple of problems with this sensational video. Most store bought or restaurant wakame is loaded with sugar and dyes. Also, the researchers used powdered forms of the supplements so why not just point out which one is effective?

    Also, since this enhance activity of T cells, wouldn’t that also mean TNF cells? If so, there are tens of thousands of folks in anti-TNF meds for IBD, psoriatic arthritis, and a host of other auto-immune diseases. Perhaps a warning to them to avoid wakame would be in order?

    Lastly, I just found this article which states that consistent use of seaweed supplements, while helpful in some areas, can cause increased risk of thyroid disease!

    http://healthyeating.sfgate.com/health-benefits-brown-seaweed-supplements-7627.html




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  8. Hello my name is Lorna .I suffer from an under active throyd.
    Would eating seaweed help me if so how much can I consume or do seaweed come in tablet form.Thank you Lorna




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  9. This is just general website feedback. Mostly I don’t like the changes.
    – The video takes up too much of the screen on my 13.5″ chromebook and unless I click full screen view (which I don’t like to do), I can’t see all of it.
    – The videos now lag and stall, which they didn’t do before. I don’t know if that’s a function of the change or coincidental but unrelated.
    – I, like others, don’t like all the movement on the screen. What was wrong with it before where you just focused on the document and showed a highlight.
    – The screen is too crowded. The header at the top needlessly takes up too much space; the big help button in the bottom encroaches from the bottom and the share button bar on the left encroaches from the side.

    I like the early days when you just presented the info in a simple clean fashion with simple lines and a normal sized video windowpane. Please stop trying to be so 2017. I’m here for the info, not to see how big the header and video window can be.




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    1. Thank you for the feedback. The new design was developed after gathering a large amount of user input back in the fall, and while we may not be able to make other changes immediately we are capturing all of this feedback, as it’s very important to us to ensure a happy audience! With regards to the video size, I had this same experience at first and it’s a result of the default resolution settings on many computers.  If you have a Mac you can simply hit Command then the – sign key, and it will decrease the page size a bit so you can see more of the page (and the full video) in your browser. If you have another kind of computer, there should be a similar function available. I hope that helps!




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    2. Putting these new “motion graphics” zoom effects videos into FULL-screen mode creates “global optic flow”, the same as one normally gets while locomoting (but you’re not). And that is why it makes one sick (due to sensory conflict). My browser screen needs to be set at 80%! If not the edges of the video are lost. and as stated, I do not want to feel sick as i do in full-screen mode. I do NOT want to feel like I am flying through space while trying to read and comprehend extremely attention-demanding information. When will they get it??




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  10. Is the chance to comment on the format of the video over? If not I want to complain some more. This one doesn’t fit my screen. It’s not fun to watch like the older ones. I am only listening to Dr G now. That’s not bad but I did enjoy it more with the other type of video




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      1. With regards to the video size, I had this same experience at first and it’s a result of the default resolution settings on many computers. If you have a Mac you can simply hit Command then the – sign key, and it will decrease the page size a bit so you can see more of the page (and the full video) in your browser. If you have another kind of computer, there should be a similar function available. I hope that helps! (Please note we are collecting all of this feedback, also!)




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        1. That helps, but now the font size of these comments is too small. I like the old format better where I could always increase the size of the screen to read the references better when ever I chose.




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    1. I have avoided the videos the last week or two out of sheer disgust (they make me, like others, sick). I provided extensive feedback to them back then on proper graphic design and the psychological reasons for it. I even offered my services as a contributor. They claim they are listening. We have a whole cycle of these awful new experiments to suffer. Then we’ll see if they listened.

      Just found:
      Can un-click a thumbs-up!
      Can both thumbs-up AND thumbs-down a post.
      Can’t EVEN EDIT one’s own comment…




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  11. Thea, I am so sad to learn you are moving onwards. You, like many who congregate here, are a rare breed. If you should find yourself passing an enchanted lagoon in the land of Honalee someday don’t be surprised if a plucky sea monster raises his head in your honour. You have helped make this site a constant source of reliable info….so rare in this strange interverse. Oh dear, I might just slip back into my cave and cease my fearless roar~




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    1. Several months ago, we conducted a very large user survey and user testing. We used this information to make the changes you now see. We continue to collect feedback, however, and all of the changes are to (hopefully) make it easier for current and new visitors to the site :) If you have specific feedback, please feel free to send it through the Help button at the bottom of the screen.




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      1. I would suggest user testing with analytics for defining user behaviors. This will help you problem solve around site features and is much more effective than focus-group responses.




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  12. I’ve read that wakame causes apoptosis in cancer cells but no studies were cited. Dr. Greger, is there anything to it? And conversely, for autoimmune conditions, does wakame, or other seaweeds, help normalize an overactive immune system?




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  13. According to Dr. Helen Caldicott MD on youtube, the US government cannot boycott Japanese agriculture because of a trade treaty. Foods like green tea, soy, and supplements are grown in the land affected by Fukushima. Since Fukushima, the federal food safe radiation levels have been raised at least three times; I am unsure of the total times they have been raised but it has been raised three times. With that said, how can we be sure Wakame from Japan is safe to consume.




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  14. Lovely tribute, Hal. Thanks. I hope Thea received it as well as the many appreciations posted on different threads.

    I liked the old videos. I understand the desire to upgrade. Please find a way to do so without all the distracting movement.




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  15. I was just sitting down eating my lunch (seaweed salad and a baked potato with pesto) and thought I’d check out the NF.org video of the day. Too fun! Now I know my seaweed salad is not only tasty, but immune boosting.




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  16. Hi Dr. Greger,

    Having survived a massive heart attack (myocardial infarction of the left anterior descending artery), I strictly follow your daily dozen to prevent and hopefully reverse heart disease. However, there appears to be some items which are not on your daily dozen that are also important to take daily, such as:

    1. Vitamin B12, 250 micrograms/day
    2. Vitamin D3, 2,000 IU/day
    3. Iodine, 150 micrograms/day (from Wakame)
    4. EPA/DHA, 250-500 milligrams/day

    As I understand, taking these vital nutrients as supplements are important because the human body cannot make them, and the daily dozen does not contain enough of them.

    Are there any other essential items I may not be getting enough of when I strictly follow your daily dozen? For example, calcium?

    Thank-you for the great work you are doing for the world with your web site.

    Kind regards,
    S Shawn




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    1. Hi S Shawn
      There is a great website and app called Cronometer. You can input your daily food into it for a few days and that will give you an idea if you need to tweak your diet. For example add some dried figs for calcium. I hope that helps.
      https://cronometer.com




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  17. Hi Dr. Greger, While watching your video about wakame seaweed boosting the immune system, I began to wonder if it could make things worse for people with autoimmune diseases like Hashimoto’s. Would love to hear what you think about this.




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  18. Somewhere here, I found that the amount to consume Wakame is between 10 and 22 mg per day (to avoid, among other calamities, iodine poisoning). I wonder what is actually being measured: the dehydrated product as sold, or a hydrated amount after the water is squeezed out? About 20 mg dried make about 52 mg after hydration and squeezing.

    Many thanks.




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  19. Very interesting! I would like to know if there are any studies on WFPB and people on immune suppressant meds from transplants. I do what I can to boost my immune system but my meds are doing the opposite.




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  20. Hi

    Love the site, super helpful! Love the videos this one included but I just want to know about protein intake per kg of body weight, Dr Michael Greger has said before that 0.6g per kg of body weight is more than sufficient and I have read about many cultures who thrive on and around this amount and less so I am wondering if anyone can point me towards any data that this is true and or if there are any reputable papers suggesting this.

    Thank you




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  21. Hello. After watching this video I went to the local world’s market style grocery to look for wakame. Every bag I happened upon had, in one form or another, had some label or sticker with the familiar line “this product contains chemicals known to the state of California…”. After searching for safty information, it would seem that the only safe source (meaning a source that didn’t test any unsafe amounts of heavy metals) is from a Norwegian company. Could you please address this issue in another video to prevent people from accidentally poisoning themselves while attempting to treat themselves through diet? Thank you.




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    1. Hello Uriel,

      I am a volunteer medical moderator who helps Dr. Greger answer questions on Nutritionfacts.org. I am also a whole foods plant based dietitian nutritionist located in Scottsdale, Arizona.

      I have used wakame for many years. I am partial to the Eden Foods brand, and have found them to be a credible, safe source for my sea vegetables. Here is a link http://www.edenfoods.com/faqs/view.php?categories_id=8 to a page on their site that discusses their quality control process in sourcing their veggies.

      Best of luck, and thank you for your question!

      Lisa Schmidt, MS,CN
      THE Mindful Nutritionist
      Scottsdale, AZ




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  22. First of all, great thanks to Thea for all her wonderful comments and help, I’ll miss her contribution to the site.
    As for seaweed, I just found out my big gray housecat, the Dude, loves nori.
    Go figure, I opened a package of the sheets, he came galloping into the kitchen and started complaining that I wasn’t moving fast enough to give him some.
    I think it’s the scent of the nori, he may have thought I had just opened a can of tuna! (not in this household, but cats are always optimists!)
    He loves the stuff, so I have to be careful to just give him a very small amount for a treat.
    Has anyone else here at NutritionFacts experienced this with their cats?




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    1. Thanks Lisa for this observation. I have wondered how to improve my cats’ diets. A bit of seaweed strikes me as potentially a very good source of additional phytonutrient for them. I’m gonna check it.




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  23. I used to be a huge fan of seaweed. However, recent evidence points to far more serious radiation contamination of the Pacific Ocean due to the Fukushima nuclear disaster than had been previously acknowledged that one wonders if the dangers at this point don’t outweigh the benefits.




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    1. Jeff,

      Please see my response to Doug….. the benefits do outweigh the risks, if you shop appropriately. You will note that there are some brands with very minimal contamination. Also please see Lisa Schmidt, MS,CN suggestion above.

      Dr. Alan Kadish moderator for Dr. Greger




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      1. Thank you Dr. Kadish! By the way, I’ve always had a theory that one of the reasons the Japanese are one of the world’s longest lived people, despite heavy alcohol consumption and high levels of smoking by Japanese men, is because their dietary culture is probably the only one in the world that includes seaweed as a regular part of almost every meal.




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  24. I’ve read that seaweed filters sea water. Since sea water contains a lot of minerals, such as lead and nickel, that are toxic to humans, might consuming wakame, and other seaweeds, have harmful effects?




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  25. Douglas,

    Indeed seaweeds do accumulate toxic metals and sometimes are used as an indicator of the health or not of the waterway. https://www.e-algae.org/journal/view.php?number=1929

    It appears that the question should potentially be where did the product come from….. Please see this study and perhaps choose those from less polluted areas. http://www.naturalnews.com/043871_seaweeds_heavy_metals_wakame.html.

    Dr. Alan Kadish moderator for Dr. Greger




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