Is Candida Syndrome Real?

Is Candida Syndrome Real?
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Does the presence of Candida in the stool correlate with “Candida-hypersensitivity” symptoms, such as headaches and tiredness? And what happens when people are placed on a high-sugar diet?

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Despite its “extensive…use in the brewing and baking industry,” only about 5%—1 in 20—healthy people have anti-yeast antibodies in their bloodstream, whereas in people with Crohn’s disease, that number is more like 60 or 70%. Most people with Crohn’s have antibodies that react to regular baker’s, brewer’s, or nutritional yeast—which are all just different forms of a yeast known as Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

But that baker’s/brewer’s/nutritional yeast had never been directly implicated in Crohn’s. Maybe the antibodies are a direct reaction to it—or, maybe a reaction to another yeast altogether, and the antibodies are just mistakenly cross-reacting with regular yeast. And, indeed, five years later, it was discovered that antibodies against Candida, a totally different kind of yeast, the yeast that causes thrush and vaginal yeast infections, can cross-react with Saccharomyces. So, maybe baker’s/brewer’s/nutritional yeast was just an innocent bystander all along?

For nearly 30 years, we’ve known that antibodies to Saccharomyces are linked to Crohn’s disease. But, instead of bread, beer, and nooch leading to Crohn’s disease, maybe Candida is causing the Crohn’s disease and the antibodies. Or, hey, maybe Candida is the innocent bystander, and exposure to food and beverage yeast is the real culprit. You don’t know until you put it to the test.

Take Crohn’s patients, remove yeast from their diet, and see if they get better. If they do, then indeed, it was the culprit. But if they don’t, then maybe it was something like this, where Candida is the real cause.

Before I get to the study, let me just first bust some Candida myths. Candida is a normal constituent of our gut flora. Get some Candida in your bloodstream though, and it can cause a life-threatening infection. But it’s normal to have some Candida hanging around in your mouth or colon. It’s location, location, location. Just like having stool bacteria in our colon is normal, but stool bacteria in our blood or a wound would be bad.

Because of the ability of Candida to cause problems in the wrong location, or in people who are immunocompromised, a Candida syndrome theory arose, linking the presence of Candida to all sorts of health problems, which led to “mycophobia”—fungalphobia—this “false interpretation” that the finding of Candida in your mouth or stool is evidence of some kind of infection, rather than just being totally normal. And, if you think the authors are being a little overdramatic with their phobia talk, just google Candida, and you’ll see.

Not only is it normal to have Candida in your gut; you apparently couldn’t get rid of it even if you wanted to. Give people powerful antifungal drugs, and you can drop levels down, but they pop right back up again as soon as you stop them. And, this whole concept of sugar feeds yeast; so, going on a low-sugar diet doesn’t make much sense—since, unless you’re lactose-intolerant or something, sugars should get absorbed high up in the small intestine, and never make it down into the colon. And indeed, there appears to be “no correlation” between Candida counts and sugar consumption. You can put people on a high-sugar diet by adding an additional 14 spoonfuls of sugar to people’s diets, and still not see an effect. Of course, there’s lots of reasons to cut sugar from your diet based on science, but Candida does not appear to be one of them.

There does not appear to be good evidence that the so-called “Candida-syndrome” exists at all. But, oh, those are fighting words. “Few illnesses have sparked as much hostility between the medical community and…[the believing] lay public.” The medical community has dismissed purported sufferers as emotionally disturbed, or just plain crazy. Of course, you can’t just come out and call them crazy. “Psychiatric diagnoses need to be presented gently.” For example: “Some patients prefer to” believe their mental illness is caused by the Candida, in which case, doctors may just pat them on the head, so they’ll take their pills. Patients who self-diagnose with Candida apparently “only infrequently relinquish their illness,” some to the extent that they attempt to use their yeast “as a drunk-driving defence.” I wasn’t drinking, your honor; my yeast was just self-brewing beer in my guts.

The whole concept of Candida syndrome is officially derided by the American Academy of Allergy and Immunology as “speculative and unproven,” offering “no…proof…no…proof…no proof…no proof.” The “[presumption] that the ubiquitous [Candida] has [some] toxic effect on [our] system [is] without a trace of…scientific proof.” You want no proof, someone wrote in response, how about the millions of unnecessary tonsillectomy surgeries doctors did? Don’t get me started on the radical mastectomies. At least putting people on low-sugar diets isn’t disfiguring people. Though some anti-Candida therapies can be “potentially dangerous.” Antifungal drugs might breed resistance, and can have side effects. Nystatin’s not so bad, but ketoconazole can damage your liver. And indeed, there are reports of people being treated for what may be a fake diagnosis ending up in quite dire straits because of it. So, it’s important to know if the syndrome actually exists. So, researchers decided to put it to the test.

Super simple study. Give some people some “stool-tubes” to take samples, ask them a bunch of questions about the symptoms they have—headaches, stomachaches, tiredness—all the typical Candida syndrome symptoms. And, they found no relationship to whether or not they had Candida growing in their gut. So, no “[h]ints of…Candida-syndrome could…be found.”

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Icons created by Bakunetsu Kaito, joeartcon, parkjisun, Milky, and Anna Hatzisavas from The Noun Project.

Image credit: Tess Watson via Flickr. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Despite its “extensive…use in the brewing and baking industry,” only about 5%—1 in 20—healthy people have anti-yeast antibodies in their bloodstream, whereas in people with Crohn’s disease, that number is more like 60 or 70%. Most people with Crohn’s have antibodies that react to regular baker’s, brewer’s, or nutritional yeast—which are all just different forms of a yeast known as Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

But that baker’s/brewer’s/nutritional yeast had never been directly implicated in Crohn’s. Maybe the antibodies are a direct reaction to it—or, maybe a reaction to another yeast altogether, and the antibodies are just mistakenly cross-reacting with regular yeast. And, indeed, five years later, it was discovered that antibodies against Candida, a totally different kind of yeast, the yeast that causes thrush and vaginal yeast infections, can cross-react with Saccharomyces. So, maybe baker’s/brewer’s/nutritional yeast was just an innocent bystander all along?

For nearly 30 years, we’ve known that antibodies to Saccharomyces are linked to Crohn’s disease. But, instead of bread, beer, and nooch leading to Crohn’s disease, maybe Candida is causing the Crohn’s disease and the antibodies. Or, hey, maybe Candida is the innocent bystander, and exposure to food and beverage yeast is the real culprit. You don’t know until you put it to the test.

Take Crohn’s patients, remove yeast from their diet, and see if they get better. If they do, then indeed, it was the culprit. But if they don’t, then maybe it was something like this, where Candida is the real cause.

Before I get to the study, let me just first bust some Candida myths. Candida is a normal constituent of our gut flora. Get some Candida in your bloodstream though, and it can cause a life-threatening infection. But it’s normal to have some Candida hanging around in your mouth or colon. It’s location, location, location. Just like having stool bacteria in our colon is normal, but stool bacteria in our blood or a wound would be bad.

Because of the ability of Candida to cause problems in the wrong location, or in people who are immunocompromised, a Candida syndrome theory arose, linking the presence of Candida to all sorts of health problems, which led to “mycophobia”—fungalphobia—this “false interpretation” that the finding of Candida in your mouth or stool is evidence of some kind of infection, rather than just being totally normal. And, if you think the authors are being a little overdramatic with their phobia talk, just google Candida, and you’ll see.

Not only is it normal to have Candida in your gut; you apparently couldn’t get rid of it even if you wanted to. Give people powerful antifungal drugs, and you can drop levels down, but they pop right back up again as soon as you stop them. And, this whole concept of sugar feeds yeast; so, going on a low-sugar diet doesn’t make much sense—since, unless you’re lactose-intolerant or something, sugars should get absorbed high up in the small intestine, and never make it down into the colon. And indeed, there appears to be “no correlation” between Candida counts and sugar consumption. You can put people on a high-sugar diet by adding an additional 14 spoonfuls of sugar to people’s diets, and still not see an effect. Of course, there’s lots of reasons to cut sugar from your diet based on science, but Candida does not appear to be one of them.

There does not appear to be good evidence that the so-called “Candida-syndrome” exists at all. But, oh, those are fighting words. “Few illnesses have sparked as much hostility between the medical community and…[the believing] lay public.” The medical community has dismissed purported sufferers as emotionally disturbed, or just plain crazy. Of course, you can’t just come out and call them crazy. “Psychiatric diagnoses need to be presented gently.” For example: “Some patients prefer to” believe their mental illness is caused by the Candida, in which case, doctors may just pat them on the head, so they’ll take their pills. Patients who self-diagnose with Candida apparently “only infrequently relinquish their illness,” some to the extent that they attempt to use their yeast “as a drunk-driving defence.” I wasn’t drinking, your honor; my yeast was just self-brewing beer in my guts.

The whole concept of Candida syndrome is officially derided by the American Academy of Allergy and Immunology as “speculative and unproven,” offering “no…proof…no…proof…no proof…no proof.” The “[presumption] that the ubiquitous [Candida] has [some] toxic effect on [our] system [is] without a trace of…scientific proof.” You want no proof, someone wrote in response, how about the millions of unnecessary tonsillectomy surgeries doctors did? Don’t get me started on the radical mastectomies. At least putting people on low-sugar diets isn’t disfiguring people. Though some anti-Candida therapies can be “potentially dangerous.” Antifungal drugs might breed resistance, and can have side effects. Nystatin’s not so bad, but ketoconazole can damage your liver. And indeed, there are reports of people being treated for what may be a fake diagnosis ending up in quite dire straits because of it. So, it’s important to know if the syndrome actually exists. So, researchers decided to put it to the test.

Super simple study. Give some people some “stool-tubes” to take samples, ask them a bunch of questions about the symptoms they have—headaches, stomachaches, tiredness—all the typical Candida syndrome symptoms. And, they found no relationship to whether or not they had Candida growing in their gut. So, no “[h]ints of…Candida-syndrome could…be found.”

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Icons created by Bakunetsu Kaito, joeartcon, parkjisun, Milky, and Anna Hatzisavas from The Noun Project.

Image credit: Tess Watson via Flickr. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Doctor's Note

This was a bit of a tangent off from the topic of the last video, Does Nutritional Yeast Trigger Crohn’s Disease? I return back to that in my next video, Is Nutritional Yeast Healthy for Everyone?—and then offer hope for sufferers of another inflammatory condition in Dietary Cure for Hidradenitis Suppurativa.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

115 responses to “Is Candida Syndrome Real?

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  1. “Patients who self-diagnose with Candida apparently “only infrequently relinquish their illness,” some to the extent that they attempt to use their yeast “as a drunk-driving defence.” I wasn’t drinking, your honor; my yeast was just self-brewing beer in my guts.”

    Actually, I have witnessed in myself on many occasions situations where I ate, say, a bowl of grapes, and within 20 minutes was stumbling around like I had been drinking. The mental part was fine, I still had my facilities, but the physical part was a real side effect. Same thing can happen after I eat certain melons. I literally struggle to walk a straight line.

    Eating bread makes me smell like I had been drinking, that day after eating the bread.




    8
    1. If you have trouble metabolizing sugars, then they start to ferment. Try to eat more greeens and veggies for more minerals and other nutrients that can bring your digestion in order.




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    2. Sounds more like a blood sugar spike- reactive hyperglycemia. Some people get it with a high starch meal. It is normally transient and resolves itself but unpleasant while it lasts.




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  2. I struggled for a couple of years with symptoms including the drunk feeling one night after sourdough bread and was diagnosed with candida overgrowth, after the low sugar, high veggie diet, i felt a lot better. Now if i eat sweets, i lightly get sick in the morning… i’m so confused now. I thought i had it pegged. I hope there is another article explaining what may be triggering the thought of it being the candida, and what the actual cause is. I need help!




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    1. I can’t think of anyone who didn’t feel better eating a whole food plant based diet without salt, oil, sugar added within a short period of time. Eliminating sweets, processed foods, and animal foods from the diet has had profound positive effects on so many – even for those suffering serious health issues. I never tire of reading about their successes on this site as well as https://www.drmcdougall.com/health/education/health-science/stars/

      https://www.forksoverknives.com/category/success-stories/




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    2. Sugar will cause more fermentation, and therefore aggravates the problem for people with Crohn or Candida.

      Note that sugar can be healthy sugar such as from fruit or sweet potato. You just need to eat foods with yeast and foods with sugar separately.




      3
    3. Dominique,

      You’re probably not off the mark. It sounds like you might have an actual overgrowth. And your change of diet was right on the mark. I would suggest that you might explore using an organic acids test, potentially coupled with both an allergy panel and comprehensive digestive analysis. You may do well with a combination of both antifungal medications and resetting of your GI system’s flora.

      There was an apparent misunderstanding between two distinct issues. One was Dr. Greger’s reference to many misunderstandings that candida is not a disease for most as it’s ubiquitous in our environment and usually does not cause symptoms vs those with an actual disorder such as an overgrowth.

      My suggestions for the above tests are due to the potential that you might have something else going on, such as a gluten issue or allergy to other foods or an ongoing overgrowth. Worth exploring to resolve.

      Dr. Alan Kadish moderator for Dr. Greger http://www.Centerofhealth.com




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      1. I am very confused..ive read all of the comments and watched the video and I m left with so many questions. Is Dr Greger saying that candida is not real? and that candida over growth is not real and that its ok to eat all kinds of sugars including fruit.And that the sugar never even makes it to the intestines? So all of the books ive read on the topic including “The Yeast Connection” are all wrong ? …I wish someone could give me a simple explanation as to what this video is saying and also to clarify the issue of candida?….IM lost here….




        1
        1. Hello Susan I am a nutritionist and NF moderator, this video is showing the results of no relation (in most of the cases) between candyda symptoms and candida overgrowth. So yes, the video claims candida syndrome is not the cause of all the symptoms related to the “candida Syndrome” , this was proved in a study, patients were tested and they were negative to candyda overgrowth. He is not saying that you can eat all kinds of sugar, he’s just pointed out the fact that eating sugar is not correlated with the growth of candida spp. The sugar does make it to the intestines, but not to the colon where the candida lives, so this theory is based on the fact that mono, di and oligosaccharides are completely absorbed in the proximal section of the small bowelI and are therefore not available to candida in colon.In conclussion, he is proving based on science studies that those books were wrong.I hope this helps.
          If you havent seen this video https://nutritionfacts.org/video/does-nutritional-yeast-trigger-crohns-disease/, I’d suggest you do to know more about the same subject.




          1
        2. Hello Susan I am a nutritionist and NF moderator, this video is showing the results of no relation (in most of the cases) between candyda symptoms and candida overgrowth. So yes, the video claims candida syndrome is not the cause of all the symptoms related to the “candida Syndrome” , this was proved in a study, patients were tested and they were negative to candyda overgrowth. He is not saying that you can eat all kinds of sugar, he’s just pointed out the fact that eating sugar is not correlated with the growth of candida spp. The sugar does make it to the intestines, but not to the colon where the candida lives, so this theory is based on the fact that mono, di and oligosaccharides are completely absorbed in the proximal section of the small bowelI and are therefore not available to candida in colon.In conclussion, he is proving based on science studies that those books were wrong.I hope this helps.
          If you havent seen this video https://nutritionfacts.org/video/does-nutritional-yeast-trigger-crohns-disease/, I’d suggest you do to know more about the same subject.




          0
    1. Technically complex carb takes more time to digest and so its sugar does not into the bloodstream as fast, which is good for most people. But for people with Candida symptoms, the problem is in the stomach, and so sugar that stays longer in the stomach won’t help.




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      1. To clarify, when you say “Candida symptoms” are you claiming that sugars do indeed cause problems with the candida yeast but that it is in the stomach not the gut? (I thought candida didn’t exist in the stomach.) Or are you just referencing what people refer to as issues of candida/ “candida symptoms” without there being an actual link to candida being the culprit in disease; i.e., symptoms they think are related to candida yeast overgrowth but that aren’t?
        I have been believing that sugar per se is not the issue, except possibly processed kinds, but that the lack of fiber is the trouble as fiber is what the good bacteria need to increase in numbers/ what they like to ‘eat’. So, not eating fruits would be counter productive. But now with this information, it is hard to understand how candida could be a negative??? How does it get outside of the gut?




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        1. Jackie, I explained above about why Dr G called candida symptoms since it is not caused by the candida bacteria itself.

          Sugar as bad as it is, is not the culprit of candida symptoms but sugar cause more fermentation. For instance when you make beer, or bake, or make kefir water, you put in a little bit of sugar to feed the yeast culture and that will create more fermentation.

          So the same thing happens in your gut / stomach / intestine – I don’t know exactly where because I am not a doctor, but sugar + yeast = more fermentation.

          So the body of people with candida symptoms overreacts to fermentation and so sugar aggravates the problem but not cause it.




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          1. I am well confused! I thought Candida was a fungus not a bacteria? I have also found that my thrush of the past was worsened if I ate more sugary foods. How can this article be saying that sugar, even 14 teaspoons of it, does not affect candida – I know it was directly correlated to my symptoms.




            0
            1. Margie, candida is technically a fungus/yeast but you can call it bad bacteria if you want to, to contrast with good bacteria. But it is not important as they all thrive on sugar. Good bacteria counters candida overgrowth.

              https://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-8376/10-signs-you-have-candida-overgrowth-what-to-do-about-it.html

              Eating sugar does not cause candida overgrowth directly but it causes inflammation which causes infection and weakens the immune system, which contributes to candida overgrowth as well as other diseases such as CHD and cancer.

              Note that while curing candida overgrowth, you need to avoid sources of healthy sugar as well such as carb and fruits. They are all beneficial but you need to temporarily avoid them while fixing another health issue.

              https://www.thecandidadiet.com/why-does-candida-need-sugar/

              “Organisms like Candida albicans need organic, carbon-based compounds to provide them with energy. In practice this means sugars like glucose, fructose and sucrose. They use this energy to grow and to build their cell walls, which are comprised 80% of carbohydrates.

              However, Candida is a particularly versatile pathogen, and those sugars serve one extra purpose. They enable the Candida yeast cells to switch to their more virulent, fungal form. This form of Candida is faster-growing, and grows long branches that can cause Leaky Gut Syndrome. If you have noticed persistent Candida symptoms, chances are the Candida in your gut has switched to its fungal form.

              Just as eating lots of sugars can promote a Candida overgrowth, eating fewer sugars can slow down or reverse your Candida. A 2011 study found that carbohydrates were “indispensable” both for cellular growth and for the transition into fungal form. Depriving the Candida of its food source will slow its growth and prevent that transition from happening.”




              1
                1. Hi Susan, you get a good point. I look it up and it i true that sugar is not “supposed” to reach the large intestine but broken down by the enzymes in the small intestine. But when it does not such as in the case when we eat too much sugar, or in the following article of people with lactose intolerance drinking milk, the sugar will end up in the large intestine and cause a lot of problems, such as gas as mentioned in the article, but that is fermentation and that will feed the candida yeast.

                  http://www.medbio.info/horn/sugars4kids/how_are_sugars_digested.htm

                  http://www.medbio.info/horn/sugars4kids/big_and_small.htm

                  http://www.curezone.org/forums/am.asp?i=1962954




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  3. If candida is not responsible for causing all these issues in people, is it a leaky gut instead? An acquaintance is convinced they have candida syndrome and is on a very low sugar/carb diet to treat it- will that not help? What else could be done?




    3
    1. Hi Sarah, Thanks for your question. I am one of the volunteer moderators at the website. As Susan and WFPB Nancy point out including whole food plant based diet avoiding salt, oil, sugar and processed foods, and animal foods from the diet for some time would help. I would also add that every individual has to record their intake and assess what agrees with that person. I would also suggest to make sure your Vitamin D level is in optimal range. Vitamin D has emerged as a central regulator of host defense against infections. In this regard, vitamin D triggers effective antimicrobial pathways against bacterial, fungal and viral pathogens in cells of the human innate immune system. However, vitamin D also mediates potent tolerogenic effects: it is generally believed that vitamin D attenuates inflammation and acquired immunity, and thus potentially limits collateral tissue damage. Nevertheless, several studies indicate that vitamin D promotes aspects of acquired host defense. Here is video by Dr Greger on the amount of Vitamin D consumption. I hope these information are useful to you.
      Resolving the Vitamin D-Bate




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    2. I was about to ask the same question seeing as how the SAD and lifestyle of most almost guarantee intestinal permeability allowing all kinds of foreign microbes into the blood and causing reactions. I used to have IBS and huge issues with my entire digestive tract until I gave up all animal products and the little bit of processed food I used, especially oil, and the improvement was amazing. The “cure” was complete when I also started making lower sodium fermented foods and adding them to my diet, so I’ve no doubt a messed up microbiome and leaky gut is at least a huge contributor to the mountain of chronic and often mysterious health issues, including “gluten sensitivity” autoimmune issues like the RA I had since a kid, and even fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue, which also plagued me for many years. I think I tried everything, including resorting to narcotics when it got unbearable, when all along the simple and very doable, affordable, solution was diet! (Which many doctors scoffed at)




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      1. I have also used narcotics on really bad days where absolutely everything hurt for my joints. But I have not experienced as big of a turnaround as others. It has been 6 months of WFPB and occasionally i still get walloped. Usually it is after a stressful event like a fight with my husband or a dissatisfied customer with my business. I try to control my negativity but get nailed anyway with elbows and hands that feel on fire. My diet has helped a great deal but is not the whole solution for me it appears. It is frustrating because I am trying so hard to do everything that is supposed to solve my problems in my body.




        2
          1. Dr axe and mercola… lol supplement pushers and loads of advertisements on their page . Mercola recommends meat dairy, eggs, krill oil and cod liver oil….soooo he looses allot of credibility in My eyes




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        1. Hi Cynthia Stinson, – I’m no expert and don’t know everything like some on this site. But I’d like to just encourage you to stick with WFPB eating and give your body more time to “settle down”. One of the moderators suggested Vitamin-D appropriate levels so that might be a part of your solution. But I wanted to share with you that when I went WFPB ten years ago now I had terrible – and I mean terrible!! – increase in intestinal gas. Gas, gas, gas! I’d never really eaten beans so adding those and lots of cruciferous vegg really blew me up. The common thought in the WFPB community is that it takes 2 weeks to adjust to the gassy situation. Well, . . it took me 2 years for my system to finally settle down and not blow up when I ate my beans and vegg. So I encourage you to stick with it and give your body time. The fact that you’ve seen some improvement already tells me you’re on the right path. I reversed gout, pre-diabetes, 30lbs overweight, fatigue and more. But it took a while. And I will never go back.
          In Esselstyne’s book ‘Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease’, it took 3 years for the clogs in the arteries to clear out despite symptoms beginning to improve in months. So it take the body a while to undo what a lifetime of SAD eating does to us.
          Another thought for you, however, is to look at the work of Alan Goldhammer, D.C. who runs a medical fasting clinic in Santa Rosa, CA. Find Goldhammers Youtube videos and watch them. Very informative. It may be that a medical fast for a few days at his clinic might be helpful to you. I realize not everyone has the time and money to do that but it might be the thing to help you get over the hump under the expertise of medical doctors he has on staff. He also will do a complimentary phone consultation.
          http://www.healthpromoting.com/clinic-services/staff/alan-goldhamer-dc
          He and John McDougall, M.D., work closely together among other WFPB professionals.
          Don’t give up :-).




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        2. Meditation can help too. When something stressful comes up, take a moment, and pay attention to your breath. Just focus on your breath for a few in and out cycles. Once that becomes a habit, you will start to see results.




          1
        3. You cannot control your stress, but you can learn to deal with it better through meditation. Diet is NOT the only answer for most things, an all together healthy lifestyle is. Check out Jon Kabat Zinn’s book, Full Catastrophe Living.

          I used to get daily migraines, since about 4 years old. I went on Dr. Fuhrman’s migraine diet and found my MANY triggers, and now only get migraines once a week, on average. But those breakthrough migraines are caused by stress, lack of sleep, too much exercise in the sun, or my period. I’ve found meditation and exercise keep them at bay…but when I slip, I get a headache.




          0
    3. It’s not a leaky gut problem. L3eaky gut as the name implies, is when your intestine is weak and allows toxins to escape into the bloodstream. Candida symptoms and Crohn disease happen right inside your stomach or intestine.

      I begin to understand what Dr G is talking about. He called Candida symptom because it is not cause by the candida bacteria itself, which exists in the mouth for instance. It is a misnomer when people called Candida disease when the symptoms are not caused by the candida bacteria but by something else.

      What appears and nobody knows for sure yet, is that the body overreacts to fermentation food which is supposed to be good for you. It could be genetic, or it could be that the body builds the intolerance to certain types of food for some reason. It is like some people are allergic to pollen, which is an overreaction of the body to pollen. So because these symptoms are not caused by the candida bacteria then Dr G called them candida symptoms.

      My theory is that people don’t eat all kind of fermented foods, from cheese to yogurt to sauerkraut. Some people don’t eat gluten or lectin or even peanut and the body builds up an intolerance to them. Overseas people eat all kind of foods in particular fermented foods during their lifetime and have none of these digestive problems. From cheese to yogurt to tempeth to natto to even soy sauce, they are all fermented foods.




      1
      1. Ignore what I wrote above. I wrote it based on watching the video from Dr G but after further readings, I think Dr G is
        oversimplying the issue and candida overgrowth is a real health issue and not something caused by eating yeast.

        Read the following articles if you have candida overgrowth issue.

        https://draxe.com/candida-symptoms/

        http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2015/11/30/coconut-oil-candida-yeast.aspx

        Dr G tends to oversimplify everything, from fat to meat and now candida. And people just listen without questioning like it is gospel.




        6
    4. I suspect, as the video suggests, that Candida is a bystander in Crohn’s.

      Eliminating refined carbs has little effect

      No correlation between C. albicans counts in the specimens and the habitual uptake of refined carbohydrates was observed. A high-sugar diet did not increase the frequency of C. albicans–positive samples, the number of subjects positive for C. albicans in the mouth washes, or the concentration of candidal blastoconidia in the samples of the 28 subjects. However, in selected subjects with elevated counts of oral C. albicans, we observed an increase in fecal C. albicans counts in response to the diet.

      .

      Small intestinal fungal overgrowth by Candida seems best accounted for by proton pump inhibitor (for example, Prilosec) use and intestinal dysmotility.




      8
  4. One theory for the reason high candida stool and saliva titers are so high is that the fungi sequester mercury and people with any significant mercury body load will have high titers of candida and not be able to get significantly reduce them until the drastically reduce their mercury load




    1
  5. The video started out to address the Candida, Yeast, Crohns triangle but didn’t resolve that. The video ended saying there is not Candida Syndrome by measuring Candida in stool in relation to symptoms. But what about when Candida gets into the blood stream and antibodies to Candida? Did I miss something?




    11
    1. That’s exactly what I was thinking… This video states that yeast doesn’t cause Crohn’s disease, but candida possibly does. Then it states that candida doesn’t exist.

      What is this video saying about Crohn’s disease then?
      And if candida overgrowth doesnt exist, why do so many people feel better after cutting out sugar?
      What is this video saying about candida overgrowth in general?

      I’ve been waiting for Dr. Michael Greger to do a video about candida, but this was less informative than I was hoping.

      Waiting for part 2!




      10
        1. Jessica could it be that when a person stops eating sugar they probably start eating more healthfully? If you look over the original information from Dr Crook that diet is pretty healthy. No processed foods etc. So maybe it has more to do with stopping one thing and adding another?




          6
      1. “And if candida overgrowth doesnt exist, why do so many people feel better after cutting out sugar?” Exactly because they cut out sugar. A highly refined chemical and major component of the SAD. How could it be the case that someone wouldn’t feel better by eliminating refined sugar from their diet? Why would people feel better after cutting out, heavy metals, pesticides, animal products, and fat?




        9
        1. This makes total sense. I guess I should’ve clarified that by sugar I also meant fruit. I’m all for eating lots of fruit, but there are some people who feel better when they cut out fruit. I was hoping for an explanation for this from the video.




          0
          1. Yes, the low carb people are promoting not eating fruits and from what I read, it works for some people. I do continue to eat fruits until I see any problem, but I do watch out my carbs these day. I tried to limit below 200 grams per day.




            5
        1. He said that candida in the mouth exists but not candida in the stomach which is harmful. A lot of people have have candida symptoms and so what is the cause?




          1
      2. Jessica,

        Sorry for the misunderstandings……. A few clarifications: There are two distinct issues at play with the wording of the candida deal….. There is absolutely an overgrowth syndrome. In clinic you can see both physical and physiological evidence. The best known populations experiencing this phenomena would be immune compromised individuals. This can be a very serious issues and/or reflective of other underlying pathologies. I have used the azole family of antifungal prescriptions with amazing results, when coupled with other lifestyle changes…..and rarely have there been any issues with liver enzyme elevations. The dose, the right patient and the correct diet do make a difference.

        There is no lack of candida in our environment and some have made the finding of candida a hallmark of a perceived disorder. Clinically we do see significant changes in folks who decrease their sugars, one of the yeasts food sources, however is it a decrease in the other metabolic changes that’s making the difference ? Think in terms of inflammation or just a disrupted gut flora or ……all of the above which respond positively to less sugar and well junk food ?

        As to the connection with crohn’s disease….There are numerous cross relativities well known and understood, as we share short snippets (epitopes) of proteins across different family lines that have our immune system mistakenly think we are under attack. This may be exactly the situation with the candida.

        A good example is the latex allergy to foods and multiple foods to inhalants. You might find this link useful: http://latexallergyresources.org/latex-cross-reactive-foods-fact-sheet

        Trust this teases out the issues ?

        Dr. Alan Kadish moderator for Dr. Greger http://www.Centerofhealth.com




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    2. I got the feeling that it said that candida does not exist. I am no expert in candida but some people do have symptom of candida. No matter what causes it, it’s a reality for some people. Nutrition is important of course but don’t blame all people with candida symptoms of eating lousily.




      2
    3. …a lot missing. That fungus is a eukaryote -as we are- that have ‘strategies’ for escaping detection from our immune system and ability to communicate chemically with each other to synchronize attack, leaves me unsurprised that candidiasis is a mystery.

      The link with Crohn’s is especially intriguing as MAP infection is now implicated as the cause. The whole ‘biofilm’ environment needs more study.

      Fascinating stuff.

      Oh, and if you want to make yeastie beasties happy, foods that have been pre-digested are their favorites: everything that has been yeast fermented like bread.wine beer… pure sugar less so. That’s what I learned as a baker.




      2
    4. Yes, I thought I was the only one who thought I’d missed the part where he gets back to whether yeast is the direct cause of crohn’s or if Candida does play a role. It seems like this video lost track of its core premise and went on an anti-Candida tangent, never returning to the original question.




      2
    5. –Also hoping there will be more to the Crohn’s story: What causes it; should Nutritional Yeast -or any other foods or practices- be avoided by folks with it, etc.




      0
  6. I have dermatitis and/or dandruff all over my face and hair, which is annoying and sometimes painful. The internet seems to say it’s because of an overreaction to yeast, presumably candida. The treatments I have seen are all over the map, with my favorite being to drink goat milk kefir and bone broth, both of which I refuse to do for what should be obvious reasons to readers of this website. But what should I do instead? I’d love to hear some advice. Thanks!




    4
    1. Try the “SCD” diet for this, the specific carbohydrate diet, google it, and only eat the vegan foods on the
      “approved” list. Give it 2 months, no cheating. People have profound reversals of skin issues, dermatitis,
      scalp fungus, itching, etc.

      And I would avoid all added oils and sweetners, even natural approved sweetners. Avoid the “starchy” fruits
      such as bananas. Eat an apple or some berries, stuff like that for sweets.




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      1. I am not promoting eating meat or anything but scientifically, for people with Crohn issue, some plants foods have sugar in it. Therefore the SCD diet has some animal foods for this reason.




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          1. That diet appears to work for some people. For optimal health even if you don’t have any real digestive problem, then you need to feed the good bacteria as well like you said. I eat a very complete diet including a lot of fermented foods and taking probiotics supplement at the same time.




            3
      2. I tried this and many other things, and yes, symptoms may improve the same way not eating complex carbs will lower blood sugar in a diabetic, but you are simply mitigating symptoms, not FIXING the cause. I like the analogy… it is like your sink overflowing and you keep mopping the floor instead of shutting off the faucet. If only finding the cause of illness was as easy as shutting off a faucet, it is often very obscure and counter-intuitive. People still think I’m crazy when I tell them I nixed my T2 diabetes by eating a high starch, whole food plant based diet with no animal products and no added fat, because it is intramyocellular lipids… fat clogging muscle cells and blocking the effects of insulin… that cause diabetes, NOT sugar. Our bodies primarily run on glucose, but the drugs that lower the levels in the blood make you tired and gain weight, making you feel even worse. The solution to all the symptoms is to fix the problem, not drug it, but seems all most doctors deal in drugs anymore. Just say no! lol Thank you Dr G for changing that sick paradigm!




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        1. Hi guys, thanks for the responses. Perhaps I should mention that I have been eating a WFPB diet as per Dr. Greger’s recommendations for a few years now. A lot of my health problems have gotten substantially better (eg blood pressure, cholesterol) but the dermatitis has actually gotten quite a bit worse. I wonder if it’s a food allergy? Thanks again!




          0
            1. Jerry, this is ridiculously irresponsible to post this. All compelling available evidence points to coconut oil as being a health hazard. Please don’t post links to sites that make their money from selling supplements to poor unsuspecting people.

              Dr. Ben




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          1. Hi Kendall- 1st, really really REALLY make sure you’re getting enough flax (oil supplement thoughts from others?) and staying well hydrated. 2-what cleaning agents are you using? Is it possible that your detergent, soaps, shampoos may be a culprit…or possibly a pet or irritant in your bed or home you may be dealing with?




            1
          2. Dermatitis is a garbage can diagnosis that could have millions of causes. You’ll need to find out what the cause is. It could be food, it could be bacteria, it could be viruses. Best to see a dermatologist to try to find out.

            Dr. Ben




            1
        2. Vegetater, what a great explanation! I always enjoy hearing about your remarkable recovery and I love the “just say no!” LOL

          Kendall: In reading about the SCD, I remembered a diet that I did in the spring to heal up gut issues, allergies, and interstitial cystitis. I hesitated at first since I was already wfpb, but the Paddison Program really seemed to have done wonders. http://doctorklaper.com/answers/answers07 Clint Paddison has talk videos on youtube addressing arthritis, Crohn’s and different autoimmune conditions – very interesting guy https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=en3YF2atfi0




          1
        3. How sick were you and how long did it take to get big results? I used to be very addicted to sugar so the candida title of the video got my attention. I would love to have complete relief the way you have. Is there hope still? I have been WFPB for 6 months now. I thought maybe it would take the two years other people have experienced to lose my 50 pounds and get better health.




          1
          1. hi Cynthia – not sure if you were asking me , but here goes. I was in excruciating pain, and at the end of my rope. My diet was good, wfpb, but I had increasing inflammation/pain/allergy that wouldn’t go away. I was in agony. In desperation I tried the paddison program. It is wfpb , but its a type of elimination diet. I got relief within days eating celery and cucumber and drinking camomile tea. http://doctorklaper.com/answers/answers07 If you scroll down on that page you’ll see an outline of the suggested food categories and time frames. Everyone is different, so there may be foods that you need to set aside and retry in a few months. I was in no hurry, but I felt better quickly . https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=en3YF2atfi0 I would encourage you to watch a few videos today. NutritionFacts has a great collection of videos on inflammation, arthritis and plant based foods. Clint Paddison has numerous videos on youtube talking to people about their incredible recoveries.
            Have a look and see what you think!




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  7. I thought candida is pronounced \’kan-da-da\ (the two a’s should be upside down e’s)? Thank you so much for this wonderful review. I have come to the same conclusion with my own literature review and thankfully have fewer patients requesting long term antifungals for their “can DEE da” (which prior to this presentation was always my tipoff that they’d been on the internet too much).




    2
  8. Thanks for this video. It will save me a lot of time with a lot of patients. Cancer patients have enough on their plate to worry about and we need to focus on what is necessary to help them through it. I have never seen a patient with “candida” overgrowth in their gut. However, many seem to benefit from a “candida diet” which is merely low glycemic index and high fiber with a lot of vegetables — so of course they are going to improve, as the huge toxic load from all that gmo meat and gmo dairy and poison canola/soybean/safflower oil is no longer hitting their system.




    16
  9. I have used complimentary modalities (acupuncture, energy healing) with great enthusiasm and learned much. But I have noticed that Naturopaths refer often (a few of my friends and clients) to, “Candida Syndrome”. I think it is a big money maker from the, “cleanses” to the blood and stool testing. Of course there are tests and costs that may be unnecessary in allopathic medicine as well.

    But my main concern is the slippery slope of the carb-sugar fears from the yet to be proven, “Candida Syndrome” that may lead people off of healthy whole food based carbohydrates to more meat consumption. But alas, that is nothing I can control nor desire to. I can only continue to take of me with my WFPBD, exercise and meditation.

    Eat healthy plant food and heal.

    A proud monthly supporter of Nutritionfacts.org




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  10. Hello Dr. Greger and team,

    I was a volunteer for Nutrition Facts in the past– until I became very sick with Lyme disease. I am much better now, but have been on antibiotics for 8 months. I do have high candida antibodies IgM, IgG and IgA. I’m on nystatin but was encouraged to avoid sugar and really most carbs- hard for a vegan. Any extra advice considering I do have the antibodies?




    3
    1. Jackie, the antibiotics kill the beneficial bacteria and therefore you need more probiotics foods and supplement. Then about candida overgrowth, I research it a little bit and find out that it is not just an inconvenience but it is a serious health issue, one that can lead to infection in the intestine and then leaky gut. You know leaky gut is not something to ignore because it means that toxins can escape your intestine and go into your bloodstream and that can lead to more serious consequences and your illness will be amplified. I know that you are vegan and I am not promoting meat eating or anything but when a health issue arises, you have to consider all options or otherwise your own life is on the line and not those little animals. So you may want to consider Dr Axe or Mercola protocol. Otherwise denying that candida overgrowth does not exist and it’s not a yeast problem and waive your hand, is not the solution. Ignore all these thumb up and thumb down because your health is more important than anything.

      https://draxe.com/candida-symptoms/

      http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2015/11/30/coconut-oil-candida-yeast.aspx

      One more thing you may want to try is the essential oil. It’s like an organic antibiotics. It can fix any of your symptoms, from headache to upset stomach to candida. Important note: although it is organic, you don’t want to abuse it and take it all the time but only take when your symptoms are unbearable. You put about 10 drops of this and dilute in a glass of water and drink it. Your symptoms should go away within minutes. I guarantee you.

      https://www.amazon.com/North-American-Herb-Spice-0-45-Ounce/dp/B00012NJ4G/ref=sr_1_6_a_it?ie=UTF8&qid=1504366638&sr=8-6&keywords=wild%2Boregano%2Boil&th=1




      1
  11. It was demonstrated in 1969 by Krause, that Candida organisms are capable of escaping the intestinal tract and reaching blood and urine in humans even in individuals with no compromised immune system. That antibiotics is the cause of candida overgrowth which can become very invasive and produces all sorts of toxins (like endotoxins). He showed that Candida overgrowth also causes chemical hypersensitivity (known today as: Multiple Chemical Sensitivity) and can invade parts of the body causing death. He also revealed the remedies for stopping the overgrowth. That Essential Fatty Acids are anti-fungal and is the primary treatment (can add certain strains of probiotics, etc). In 1945, Wyss demonstrated that the greater number of carbon atoms in the fatty acid chain, the greater the fungicidal activity is (up to the point exceeding eleven carbons where solubility becomes the limiting factor).




    2
    1. Louanne, what you described above is absolutely correct. Candida overgrowth can cause infections in the intestine which leads to leaky gut and now toxins will escape from your intestine to go into your bloodstream and that will lead to unpredictable consequences. Because as you eat, even with healthy foods, there are always some toxins that you are supposed to eliminate through waste, but just imagine if all of your poop toxins go into your bloodstream instead, we cannot predict the consequences.

      Interesting that you mentioned about the essential fatty acids which are anti fungal. So you can eat more fats, from Omega 3 fats to coconut fat. Dr Mercola talked about coconut oil as a remedy.

      http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2015/11/30/coconut-oil-candida-yeast.aspx




      1
  12. Hi Jackie Bailey, thanks for your question. I am one of the volunteer moderators. I would like to thank you for your work in the past as well on the website. I was pointing out the importance of vitamin D in my earlier comment to the question regarding candida. Vitamin D has emerged as a central regulator of host defense against infections. In this regard, vitamin D triggers effective antimicrobial pathways against bacterial, fungal and viral pathogens in cells of the human innate immune system. It is generally believed that vitamin D reduce inflammation and acquired immunity, and thus potentially limits collateral tissue damage. Nevertheless, several studies indicate that vitamin D promotes aspects of acquired host defense. I shall refer you to two of Dr G. video on Vitamin D. Also I would sugust making sure the healthy micro biome. Prebiotics have a direct effect on microbial growth as they stimulate the growth of beneficial bacteria and suppress the growth of pathogens. Probiotics have protective effect against pathogens and a systemic indirect effect on immunological amelioration. I hope these information are useful to you.
    Vitamin D for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Microbiome: We Are What They Eat




    5
  13. Hmmm, this is suuuuper conflicting for me. I was eating a healthy vegan diet for about 5 years and suffering from horrible digestion problems (bloating, cramps, smelly gas, hemorrhoids, itchy rectum). High FODMAP food was the worst. When I finally went to a holistic gastroenterologist, I was was diagnosed with “fungus/yeast” overgrowth and put on Nystatin and the anti-candida diet (Nystatin for 3 months and the anti-candida diet for 5 months). Now, 8 month after my diagnosis, I’m about 90% better. I still avoid sugar and gluten. How could I have improved tremendously by treating “candida” if there’s no such thing as “candidaiasis”??




    2
  14. I have been dealing with a candida overgrowth for years now with my main symptom being a vaginal yeast discharge. Oddly, when my gynecologist tests for a yeast infection there is no infection. However, there is a direct correlation between consuming sugar and the discharge. Even eating high sugar fruits, will cause the discharge to appear. I maintain a very low sugar diet to avoid this unpleasantness. Type II Diabetes also runs strong in my family, though I don’t have Type II currently. Could my vaginal discharge be related to the strong hereditary factor of Type II, from leaky gut or from something else? The study from the video states that the consumption of sugar does not increase the candida in stool but why might I be having the symptoms I’m having if sugar does not effect candida growth? Also, one of Dr. Greger’s earlier videos “They Are What We Eat” discusses how a plant based diet will increase the beneficial bacteria and reduce the opportunistic bacteria (I’m assuming that includes candida). In theory a vegan/plant-based diet should help balance out the candida overgrowth. So might this mean that if I were to maintain a vegan/plant-based diet that eventually I would even be able to consume high sugar fruits without triggering
    a discharge? I would definitely be happy to hear more on this topic in future videos from Dr. Greger!




    0
  15. I wonder about all this .. allot. I agree candida is our communal buddy, but with great growing conditions doesn’t it overgrow?, can’t it crowd things out in the intestines causing strange symptoms of malabsorption, etc. I’ve looked at my imaging studies and I have white splotches all up and down my intestinal tract, no doctor will admit to knowing anything about the white stuff, they don’t even know if it’s normal. Definite fermentation, apples are out, avocados are out of my diet, among many others, onions, garlic, breads, sugars, potato, basically high fodmap diet is what I’m on, and so without all these wonderful fibers to feed our microbiome it dies off, thus making the condition worse, and I tested for that too, I’ve got about zero lactobacillus and bifidobacterium. Burping, and gas. It used to be so bad I couldn’t sleep at night and it would wake me all hours of the night, mass pain. Sadly before I wised up the G.I. doctors had groupthink/talked me out of my completely healthy gallbladder, well that sent me into a tailspin of misery that only started getting better after I started attending healthy gut summits, making home made broth, generally following the intro diet for SCD and GAPS, juicing nutrient dense vegetables, and avoiding anything remotely inflammatory. Their are many plants I cannot eat. No matter what I eat it’s going to hurt. What helps?, who knows anymore. I’m sourcing my non-fda approved probiotics from Europe, I’m taking a prebiotics syntol from Arthur Andrews, I rotate an ever growing list of natural anti fungals I keep on hand. Generally rotating antifungals for a week or two and not eating anything particularly fun I start doing much, much better. But, then my weight is dropping, and within two weeks I’ll be at the bottom of my BMI. So .. sigh.. how do I gain weight?, well plants are not doing it, I have yet to be able to gain weight by eating strictly plants. I am gearing up for a herbal SIBO self treatment even though my testing was negative, I’m symptomatic. I saw Michael talk in my hometown at our vegan fest last year, great guy, saving lives by the dozen at a time I’m sure, saw him on what the health documentary as well, glad the word is continually getting out, also a great resource here. Whenever a friend goes in for his heart stents, I always want to sit down and talk with them, it’s hard watching friends/family die from otherwise preventable diseases.




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  16. In the video, Dr. Gregor says,

    “Take Crohn’s patients, remove yeast from their diet, and see if they get better. If they do, then indeed, it was the culprit. But if they don’t, then maybe it was something like this, where Candida is the real cause. Before I get to the study, let me just first bust some Candida myths…”

    But then he after going through the supposed myths, he never returns to the study about whether Crohn’s patients get better if they remove yeast from their diet.

    Did I miss something?




    3
    1. OK, I think I now understand what he said. So he said that some people have problem eating yeast, or fermented foods in general. So if you remove yeast and get better then the problem is yeast. But if you don’t then it is something else, with Candida overgrowth as possible culprit.

      Here are the symptoms of Candida overgrowth:

      https://draxe.com/candida-symptoms/

      Yeast infection (has nothing to do with eating yeast):

      https://draxe.com/vaginal-yeast-infection/




      1
  17. Seems likely that there’s an entirely distinct cause that’s responsible for intestinal permeability to both Saccharomyces and Candida antigens.

    Crohn’s incidence has huge geographic variation, ranging from a high of 214 / 100,000 in the United Kingdom, to 201 in North America (where adults from the Northeast have 36% higher prevalence than those from the South), 155 in New Zealand, 65 in Israel, 53 in Lebanon, 44 in North India, 40 in Southern Europe, 13 in Japan, 11 in Korea, 7 in Singapore, to under 2 in an older study of Hong Kong and a recent one in Romania. Some of this variation is undoubtedly due to differing health-care access and diagnostic criteria, and there are some genetic markers in Northern Europeans associated with susceptability. But it beggars belief that these can account for a 100-fold difference in prevalence of a debilitating disease.

    It’s worth noting there’s a gradient of Crohn’s from the poles to the equator similar to that for multiple sclerosis, another disease associated with low vitamin D status. Nurses with lifestyle predicted vitamin D 30 ng/mL have a 62% reduced risk compared to those with D < 30 ng/mL, and Crohn's patients who normalized their D status (with sunlight or supplements) have a 44% reduced likelihood of surgical resection. Healthy diet likely plays a role, too. A systematic review found high dietary intakes of fats and meat were associated with increased risk of Crohn’s, while high fiber and fruit intakes were associated with decreased risk. A French study found that higher intakes protein were significantly associated with 230% higher risk of Crohn’s, and breakdown by source indicates animal protein and not plant protein is responsible for the association. Nurses who consumed more fiber (which feeds beneficial microbes) have a 41% reduced risk of Crohn’s, while those consuming more dietary zinc (which improves intestinal tight junctions) have a 37% reduced risk.

    Would all these dietary factors, combined, account for the high prevalence of Crohn’s in North America, the UK, and Scandanavia? Perhaps when one also includes the effect of antibiotic exposure, associated with a 74% higher risk of new-onset Crohn’s disease, and 175% higher risk in children.

    Few of these associations bear a relation with yeast exposure. To me, they do suggest avoiding sun exposure, eating a high fat, high animal protein, low fiber, low fruit diet, and seeking antibiotics when unnecessary combine to create intestinal dysbiosis, increased intestinal permeability, and dysregulated immune response, a perfect storm for developing a autoimmune gastrointestinal disease that should be rare.

    Fingers crossed that this won’t look terrible when I submit. I miss an editor.




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    1. Above 2nd para should read: “nurses with lifestyle predicted vitamin D >30 ng/mL have a 62% reduced risk compared to those with D < 20 ng/mL”

      Really preferred this forum when it used disqus. Might not matter for those who aren’t OCD about formatting a correct citations, I guess.




      2
  18. Might it not be the case that — even though no correlation was found between presence of Candida and presenting symptoms — a strong cause and effect might be going on in a *subset* of the population? That might not show up in a statistical study.




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  19. Hi Don,

    I am a volunteer for Dr. Greger. Thank you so much for your question.

    You raise a good point. Could there be a genetic group of people that do suffer from elevated levels of Candida and negative Candida-stemmed effects? It’s certainly possible, but we have no evidence to date to support that. If you do find a study that shows that that may be true though, let us know, and we’d love to take a look at it!




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  20. First off – very interesting video, thank you.
    I want to point out that searching something on this site does not lead to the summary regarding the subject.
    Cholesterol, for example. I think, this would however be very convenient, because the summaries provide a way to very easily get a lot of information.
    Especially people who are new to this site might benefit and maybe stay more likely.
    This is obviously not that bad of a problem, since you can always get there by means of the health topics, but I thought this might be a way to fine-tune this site just a bit more :)
    Anyway, thank you for all the work you put into this site and especially the information on it. It is truly amazing.




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  21. Hi Chaaron,

    I am a volunteer for Dr. Greger. Thank you so much for your feedback.

    I think it is a matter of personal preference, depending on the person. Some people seem to ignore the summaries (maybe people don’t like to read; they’d rather watch–I’m not sure), but others like the summaries because they give a nice general overview of the topic.

    Thank you for your feedback, as well as for your kind words about the work NF.org does to promote truthful information regarding health.




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  22. This is such a complex issue considering the number of microbes in the biome. Personally I used to look like I was peeing beer it would have so much foam on the top. When I started working in an intuitive way with food cause the wfpb wasn’t working, I used particular organisms like those used in sour cream and then I needed a diet for improving the digestive system. For me it was quite a complex process to get to somewhere healthier. I’m not sure we understand the complexity of this issue yet




    0
  23. This video started by questioning the connection between candida and Crohn’s, then went into candida “syndrome” without answering the original question. Is candida involved in Crohn’s? There is no “yeast syndrome” either but antibodies to yeast are associated with Crohn’s.




    0
  24. I used to have chronic Candida Albicans overgrowth. It developed from years of antibiotics for cystitis. I was frequently plagued by vaginal thrush with decreasing immunity to the same…trapped in a cystitis, antibiotics, thrush vicious circle. I developed a leaky gut, I think, and consequent food intolerances. Moods were low and cranky. Fatigue levels were monstrous and constant. My gynaecologist termed me sick to the level of “chronic”.

    After 10 years of worsening health, aided in all innocence by the medical profession, my General Practitioner doctor noted that medicine had not helped me and he kindly and supportively suggested I seek a nutritionist who understood systemic yeast overgrowth. I found Nutritionhelp and they guided me, over 19 months, back to health with their four point plan. http://www.nutritionhelp.co.uk

    I became so well I oozed energy. My symptoms disappeared. Moodiness, incapacitating fatigue, thrush vaginally, foggy brain, painful joints, crooked fingers etc… gone. That was in 1998.

    While recovering I learned how to ward off cystitis using Eno’s or Andrews Liver Salts and water. I used Gynoflor to ward off vaginal thrush. These days my immune system does the job for me. If I have to have antibiotics I take a probiotic supplement for about 4 weeks on completion of the course of antibiotics.

    For me a yeast overgrowth had a serious and negative impact on my life and my family. Getting control back… bringing balance back as Candida Albicans levels were greatly reduced… changed my life and restored my enjoyment of it. Amongst many improvements, my fingers straightened out. It no longer hurt my ankle joints to walk a few feet across my kitchen, thinking was sharper and quicker.




    1
  25. I have issues with candida systemically every time I take antibiotics. After taking antibiotics I go low sugar and up my intake of probiotics to replace the good bacteria in addition to taking an antifungal. Is this related to the topic of this video? Because I don’t think digestive symptoms and vaginal yeast infections are all in my head!




    0
  26. Hi this is Dr. Daniela Sozanski, PhD and Functional Naturopath, Moderator for Nutritionfacts. I do believe your symptoms are real. Though I do not believe the connection is fully understood, I have had similar experiences as you do. Let’s take the gut for instance: the micro-biome will be reduced by antibiotics and it should be restored by plant food, plenty of fiber and maybe a short term of probiotics. But if it is true that a fine balance exists throughout the body between bacteria and fungi, then the vaginal ecosystem will also be affected by antibiotics, and in this case allowing the fungus (Candida) to overgrow to a vaginal infection. I hope you have a great day, Daniela




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