Natural Treatment for Acne and Fungal Infections

Natural Treatment for Acne and Fungal Infections
4.68 (93.6%) 75 votes

Green tea may help with athlete’s foot, dental plaque, acne, impetigo, and bladder infections, but if it’s so good at killing bacteria, what about our gut flora?

Discuss
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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Which plant should we give for which skin disease? There have been thousands of studies published to date about the health effects of green tea, but it wasn’t until fairly recently that researchers have begun to look at the possibility of using green tea for the prevention and treatment of infections. Patents have been taken out on the “antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral properties of tea.” Let’s review some of the evidence.

In terms of fungal infections, green tea compounds “demonstrated…potent antifungal activity…against” the primary cause of athlete’s foot, fungal nail infections, jock itch, and ringworm—comparable, in some cases, to powerful antifungal drugs like fluconazole. Okay, but this is in a petri dish.

How about a green tea foot bath for athlete’s foot fungus between the toes? Evidently, tea leaves were once used as “a folk remedy” for the fungus. So, why not put it to the test? And indeed, a once-a-day 15-minute dilute green tea foot bath led to a significant improvement in symptoms, compared to control.

Green tea baths also appeared to help with fungus-associated atopic dermatitis, though there was no control group, and full-strength green tea may help clear candida yeast from poorly cleaned dentures. How about for the bacteria that cause plaque and gingivitis? Even a 2% green tea mouthwash was found to be effective. Yes, you should be able to control plaque just with proper brushing and flossing, but with an emphasis on “proper”—most people don’t brush the recommended 4 minutes a day; and so, a dilute green tea mouthwash may help.

Now, in terms of strictly plaque bacteria-killing ability, green tea got beat out by a “garlic with lime mouth rinse,” but I think I’ll just stick with the green tea, thank you very much.  Ew, especially when green tea appears to not just kill plaque bugs directly, but also boost the “antibacterial capacity” of saliva after you drink it.

What about green tea for acne? Six weeks of a 2% green tea lotion cut the number of pimples more than half, and significantly reduced the severity, making it a cheap, effective treatment for acne.

Impetigo is another bacterial skin infection that can affect the face, but a “tea ointment” can effect an 80% cure rate, on par with antibiotics given topically or orally.

What about bladder infections? We know a certain concentration of green tea compounds can kill the type of E. coli that causes urinary tract infections. The question then becomes how much tea do you have to drink to achieve those concentrations in your bladder? And, it turns out, not much. Just one cup of tea might have an effect, but you might have to space out multiple cups over the day, since it gets cleared out of your system within about eight hours. So, where we stand now: the test tube data look good, but there has yet to be a single study to put it to the test. So, it should, at this point, just be used as an adjunct therapy for bladder infections. But, “[w]ith emerging multidrug-resistant organisms,” green tea certainly holds potential.

Wait a second, though. If it’s so good at killing bacteria, if we drink green tea, might we be killing the good bacteria in our gut?  No, that’s the amazing thing; a great advantage against other bacteria-killing agents—”no effect [on our] intestinal flora.” But, that may actually not be true. Drinking green tea may actually boost the levels of our good bacteria, by acting “as a prebiotic and”, thereby, “improv[ing] the colon environment.”

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Which plant should we give for which skin disease? There have been thousands of studies published to date about the health effects of green tea, but it wasn’t until fairly recently that researchers have begun to look at the possibility of using green tea for the prevention and treatment of infections. Patents have been taken out on the “antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral properties of tea.” Let’s review some of the evidence.

In terms of fungal infections, green tea compounds “demonstrated…potent antifungal activity…against” the primary cause of athlete’s foot, fungal nail infections, jock itch, and ringworm—comparable, in some cases, to powerful antifungal drugs like fluconazole. Okay, but this is in a petri dish.

How about a green tea foot bath for athlete’s foot fungus between the toes? Evidently, tea leaves were once used as “a folk remedy” for the fungus. So, why not put it to the test? And indeed, a once-a-day 15-minute dilute green tea foot bath led to a significant improvement in symptoms, compared to control.

Green tea baths also appeared to help with fungus-associated atopic dermatitis, though there was no control group, and full-strength green tea may help clear candida yeast from poorly cleaned dentures. How about for the bacteria that cause plaque and gingivitis? Even a 2% green tea mouthwash was found to be effective. Yes, you should be able to control plaque just with proper brushing and flossing, but with an emphasis on “proper”—most people don’t brush the recommended 4 minutes a day; and so, a dilute green tea mouthwash may help.

Now, in terms of strictly plaque bacteria-killing ability, green tea got beat out by a “garlic with lime mouth rinse,” but I think I’ll just stick with the green tea, thank you very much.  Ew, especially when green tea appears to not just kill plaque bugs directly, but also boost the “antibacterial capacity” of saliva after you drink it.

What about green tea for acne? Six weeks of a 2% green tea lotion cut the number of pimples more than half, and significantly reduced the severity, making it a cheap, effective treatment for acne.

Impetigo is another bacterial skin infection that can affect the face, but a “tea ointment” can effect an 80% cure rate, on par with antibiotics given topically or orally.

What about bladder infections? We know a certain concentration of green tea compounds can kill the type of E. coli that causes urinary tract infections. The question then becomes how much tea do you have to drink to achieve those concentrations in your bladder? And, it turns out, not much. Just one cup of tea might have an effect, but you might have to space out multiple cups over the day, since it gets cleared out of your system within about eight hours. So, where we stand now: the test tube data look good, but there has yet to be a single study to put it to the test. So, it should, at this point, just be used as an adjunct therapy for bladder infections. But, “[w]ith emerging multidrug-resistant organisms,” green tea certainly holds potential.

Wait a second, though. If it’s so good at killing bacteria, if we drink green tea, might we be killing the good bacteria in our gut?  No, that’s the amazing thing; a great advantage against other bacteria-killing agents—”no effect [on our] intestinal flora.” But, that may actually not be true. Drinking green tea may actually boost the levels of our good bacteria, by acting “as a prebiotic and”, thereby, “improv[ing] the colon environment.”

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Doctor's Note

Drinking tea with meals may impair iron absorption, so better to drink between meals. More on green tea, one of my three favorite beverages (along with water and hibiscus tea):

For more on acne, check out:

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

76 responses to “Natural Treatment for Acne and Fungal Infections

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  1. Can these findings be translated to white tea as well?
    I would suppose so, however Dr. Greger seldom mentions white Tea eben discussing data on green.
    Thank you :)




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      1. What foods would you recommend to someone who has MILD Seborrheic Dermatitis??!
        [This information would really help me out and could change my life, as I have been suffering with this thing for many, many years 10+]

        I know that my best bet would be a vegan diet…. BUT what foods in particular would be most effective in treating this besides green tea? ANY OTHERS?




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        1. Hi Demetri: This is Dr. Daniela Sozanski, PhD, PScD, Moderator for Nutritionfacs.org and Naturopath in Atlanta, GA.
          Not knowing anything about your medical history, it is hard to give advice in this case.
          A few thoughts:
          Treating such a condition should be considered from inside out just as much as locally or topically. In addition, lifestyle and exposure to toxins and environmental stressors should be evaluated, also, the whole range of your diet should be reviewed.
          Seborrheic Dermatitis is not supposed to be of allergic nature, but I suggest you identify foods you may be allergic to and eliminate them . An allergen profile should be developed with your doctor and/or an elimination diet followed by food challenge should be tried.
          I see a connection between this condition and inflammation. A diet rich in leafy greens, legumes, fruits, beans, nuts and seeds will allow detoxification and act as anti inflammatory agents. On the merits of a plant based diet to reduce inflammation please see https://nutritionfacts.org/video/how-to-counter-the-inflammation-of-aging/
          Reducing animal plant foods, processed foods such as deli meats, flour and flour products and sugar will also help, as they were shown to increase inflammation.
          You may want to work with a natural health provider for a focused protocol to hit all these points and surely more.
          I hope this helps, Daniela




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  2. I am guessing the question was that many seniors need to drink decaf and would that work as well? That’s what I would like to know – can we get the same benefits and antioxidants from decaf? Thanks!!




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    1. There’s different methods of decaffeination, I don’t know what they all are but I know some can be harmful such as using unnatural chemicals, but there is a natural method using just water. Not sure if any of the effects would be taken away in any case, but natural is always better and I’d imagine it would keep things intact better. Anyways, that’s a good question. Also wanted to add that because green tea has such a small amount of caffein compared to coffee that it might be ok for certain people advised to stay away from caffeinated coffee if their doctors say it’s ok. My grandma was able to drink a cup of tea even though she had to drink decaffeinated coffee and generally avoid caffein.




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  3. Where can I find 2% green tea solution for acne??? I desperately need it as traditional salicylic acid benzoyl peroxide don’t work for myou severe acne.




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    1. Just brew some at home…drink some and use some on your skin, try varying strengths. I doubt the exact 2% ratio is critical, just a metric used for scientific record keeping.




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    2. I LIKE TO TAKE A BATH IN GREEN TEA! (hard to clean the tub afterwards though because the tea stains the walls, backing soda cleaned it right-off though!)




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      1. Since watching this video I’ve begun doing a sun green tea using my camper’s shower accessory and my toenails are clear and my skin exfoliates with regularity. Much better than using soap as any excess oils and dirt just roll off.




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      1. Haha I should have checked the paper they clearly list it. Thank you! Yeah looks like they took 75ml of this (35g tea in100ml water Iraqi method of making tea) and added ethanol to make the 2%. But ethanol is sensitizing and has been proven to be an ingredient that breaks down collagen in the long term. So that’s useless. I might just make it as a toner like brewing regular tea drink some use some like someone suggested. I also found Boscia make a green tea moisturizer with no essential oils alcohols or other irritants so will combine the two and see if green tea really makes a differnece. Thank u again for linking the paper.




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  4. D-Mannose – a simple sugar that can be obtained in powdered form, can also be used to treat UTI’s. Once my mother started taking D-Mannose – 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon daily in water – she stopped getting recurring UTI’s and no longer needed the endless round of antibiotics. Furthermore, when she had her last UTI, she started taking D-Mannose at a higher rate instead of antibiotics and her UTI cleared up.

    There are currently a few studies on the effects of D-Mannose with respect to UTI’s:

    In a laboratory study published in the journal PLoS One in 2008, scientists demonstrated that D-mannose can help stop E. coli from sticking to cells found in the urinary tract.

    In a study published in World Journal of Urology in 2014, 308 women with a history of recurrent UTIs, were divided into three groups: approx one third took D-mannose, another third the antibiotic nitrofurantoin, while the rest took nothing for six months. Women taking the D-mannose or nitrofurantoin had a significantly lower risk of recurrent UTIs. As well, the D-Mannose group had a significantly lower risk of side effects than the nitrofuantoin group. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bju.12492/full




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    1. D-Mannose is effective only for UTIs caused by e-coli. Most UTIs are caused by e-coli, but not all. UTI sufferers should get a urine culture to see what type of bacteria is causing their infection. My last two UTIs were not caused by e-coli. I have been taking a pro-biotic called Fem Dophilus, and it seems to have helped to reduce the number of infections I get.




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    2. D-mannose could possibly disturb your gut microbiota like it did mine, because it’s a form of sugar. I had seemingly good results at first while using it for a UTI, but I very soon began to experience a gut disturbance accompanied by great flatulence. Not fun. I think I much prefer green tea. Simple and clean, a plant-based whole food.




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      1. Yeah that’s the only thing diet wise I haven’t tried. I’ve cut out dairy etc adopted a whole foods plant based dr.greger recommended diet, but yeah haven’t experimented with wheat. Dairy never really caused breakouts in fact I had very clear skin as a teenager and early mid 20s but now late 20s sudden massive breakouts that don’t seem to be going. My biggest concern with a gluten free wheat free diet is the fat. Usually fat is substituted in place of gluten for the texture etc. How do u keep your fat low on this diet??




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        1. I usually dont buy gluten free bread or other bakery items.. If you read the labels they often are not vegan, (eggs) and/or have oils. I eat whole grains ie rice, oats, quinoa etc as sides or in salads and do not use oil. I also avoid avocados, nuts to keep fats low.




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          1. thank you very much. i just saw the article and looks like they cut out all fats and soy from their diet in order to achieve the results. I don’t eat any oils but i do consume flax seeds, avocados, and soy as Dr. Greger recommends. I cannot cut flax seeds as they have made a monumental difference in terms of PMS and severe mastalgia (that one of Dr. Greger’s videos demonstrates; it works!) i can cut avocados but it does impact my social life as i am already limited in terms of the foods i can eat when i go out (but i can definitely do it), but soy, i love tofu and soy milk. Dr. Greger’s videos have shown how effective soy is when it comes to breast cancer prevention. I consume oat milk at home but when I’m getting matcha on the go i get it with soy as almond milk is too high in fat (and there is a lawsuit pending against silk and other companies producing almond milk as there is nothing monitoring how many almonds they actually use), and coffee stores most definitely do not offer oat milk (surprising as it is less expensive than soy/almond milk). So I am not sure how helpful this will be for me, but I can try with an overall reduction in fats I suppose and see if it makes any difference. Thank you for the link!




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    1. I would really like to know this. After years of ketoconozle, I would love to find a more healthy alternative to recurring skin fungal issues.




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      1. Follow the SCD diet, a vegan-version of it. You can find the food inventory (allowed foods/not allowed)
        on the website. Do the research. This diet fundamentally changed my skin issues, fungal, etc.
        Amazing….after years of trying everything! And yes, it can be done by being vegan.




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    2. Hi Fredric, Thanks for your question and thank you Dr Greger for this great information on power of green tea. I am one of the volunteer moderators at the website.
      One can do trill and error type of experimant of course with ingredients that are safe and not to cause harm to the body.
      I suggest making a toner with green tea for example a cup of green tea and then add 2 tea spoon fresh lemon juice and 2 tea spoon fresh apple cider vingar and mix it well and keep in the fridge and use it within a week or so. That is my home made suggestion recipe.

      I have seen similar kind of suggestions on a website that I shall share with you.
      THE BEST HOMEMADE TONER FOR ACNE PRONE SKIN




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    1. Hi Susan, thanks for your question. I am one of the volunteer moderators on the website. This is a great topic that Dr Greger is addressing. As regards to your question about green tea capsules as appose to green tea leaves or tea bag. I would say the tea leaves or tea bag are the ones that is studied and I would say it is cheaper as well. The capsule one has to check what other ingredients are in it.
      Effects of a foot bath containing green tea polyphenols on interdigital tinea pedis.




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  5. I am interested in green tea for dental health but caffeine from drinking tea causes me to have a panic attack about 60% of the time. I believe the caffeine increases my heat rate then my mind looks for something scary in my environment to blame it on. Sometimes I can drink a small (8oz) cup of green tea when I first get up in the morning and it does not trigger a panic attack. It also makes my Essential Tremor (head) worse. I switched to Rooibos tea thinking it had the same dental health benefits of green tea without the caffeine. Is that true? Thank you.




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    1. Yes, you’ll definitely get the same beneficial results of green tea without the caffeine. I think a little of the polyphenols are removed during the decaffeination process, but not much. Just be sure to purchase organic green tea that has been decaffeinated by the CO2 process. Every night before brushing my teeth, I drink 2 cups of decaf green tea (Alvita decaf) and swish it around my mouth a bit. This makes such a difference. Swishing makes flossing a breeze, but what I really notice is the next morning my mouth feels cleaner when I have rinsed with green tea the night before.




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    2. For dental health I swish a tablespoon of coconut oil in my mouth each morning for 20 min. It resolved my sensitive teeth and made dental visits less harrowing.




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      1. That gave me six cavities for the first time in 20 years! Sincerely do not recommend. Not a doctor, not trying to argue, just personal experience I don’t want anyone else to have to suffer.




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    3. there’s a delicious-tasting liquid green tea product that is decaffeinated which I really enjoy in my daily water drinks. it’s called Chi Tea and can be found online in several forms (the Chi-tox really works to clean out the gut). I’ve been using it for years as
      a substitute for heating water & brewing tea leaves = much easier & portable when you go out and want a drink. I’ve also found
      it to be reasonably priced online, especially when you buy several bottles at one time. check it out, a really excellent product. I
      don’t sell, nor have anything to do with it, other than consuming this stuff.




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  6. I have had severe toenail fungus for about 20 yrs and have tried everything available (except having my toenails removed which a dermatologist friend says will cure my problem) including my own concoction of Polysporin and turmeric (nightly under a Bandaid for about three weeks) as a result of MG’s enthusiasm for the antibiotic effects of turmeric. All these “cures” had no effect and some were expensive and one could have been very detrimental to my kidneys (but, thankfully, wasn’t)..

    Have you come across any cure for this difficult to cure condition Dr. G?

    Granville AIrton




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    1. Granville:

      I have had several toenail fungus infections over the years, and found that massaging organic unrefined coconut oil into the nail after a shower works wonders. Actually … I have not had any infections for years, since I routinely rub the oil onto my feet after bathing. I get complements on how shiny and healthy my nails look ( I don’t wear polish either. Something to try :-)




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    2. Hello,
      My sister cleared up a toenail fungus by applying tea tree oil to the nail and spraying the interior of her shoes before and after wearing with a spray used for jock itch.




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  7. “As far as her mom was concerned, tea fixed everything. Have a cold? Have some tea. Broken bones? There’s a tea for that too. Somewhere in her mother’s pantry, Laurel suspected, was a box of tea that said, ‘In case of Armageddon, steep three to five minutes’.” ― Aprilynne Pike, Illusions




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  8. Can green tea also improve elasticity and increase collagen of the skin??
    I notice many skincare products are including green tea as their main ingredients.




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      1. Plus all the antioxidants in green tea help protect your skin when applied topically but also by drinking it! I’ve read studies (didn’t save them) where drinking about a glass of green tea a day significantly protected skin against free radical damage from sun exposure. It’s been referenced on this website as well in an article on skin (I don’t remember which exactly) that green tea was associated with better skin health/appearance.




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  9. I’ve recently been experimenting with using Kombucha tea with ginger on my skin as a sort of sun block for when I go outdoors to check my watermelons, Persian melons, and tomatoes.

    It forms a sort of crust that I’ve left on for a few days. I will scrub it off in a couple more and expect the skin to exfoliate when I do. Curious to see what it will look like afterwards.




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    1. Follow-up:

      Skin looked fine after scrubbing off the kombucha tea protective layer… but have since started showering with sun-brewed green tea and I think I like the feel and the results even better.

      This will only be of interest to some, but green tea works wonders if you are prone to galding in the crotch. Works as a preventative or treatment.




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  10. A friend has a candida (don’t know the exact variety, it’s a fairly rare form of candida) fungal infection in both her eyes. Her corneas have turned white, effectively blinding her. Her doctors have prescribed anti fungal eye drops (very expensive); she’s going broke trying to pay for them. Do you think drinking lots of green tea help her clear up the infection? It would certainly be a lot cheaper than the drops! We suspect even if they manage to kill the infection, she will probably need cornea transplants to save her vision.




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    1. Lorinda – Your friend’s situation sounds just ghastly. I am no expert on fungus at all. But your description reminded me that some women have taken regular black tea bags, dipped them in water to moisten them, and put them on their eyes (eyes closed of course) for swelling of tissues and general refreshment. Made me wonder if your friend couldn’t do the same with green tea bags. Moisten and apply a tea bag to each eye for 20 minutes or so. I don’t think I would stop the drops. But I don’t see how this could hurt anything and maybe, perhaps help.




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    2. It’s good your friend has someone like you offering her support during what must be a very challenging time for her now as she struggles with fungal infection and sight issues. However, there doesn’t appear to be enough research to think drinking lots of green tea will clear up the severe fungal infection she has. I reviewed Publ Med as well as the sources Dr. Greger had and while there is good indication tat tea can help with fungal infections, the studies often are using tea tree extract or tea extract, not drinking tea.I could find no studies focusing on fungal eye conditions using even those more concentrated forms of tea. In this case I would not encourage you to do any more than encourage green tea drinking for the general health of it NOT as a remedy to such a severe and serious condition, certainly not as a replacement of the medicine. You can support your friend in her efforts to promote her health in general through whole food plant based nutrition, but it is taking a giant leap for you to encourage tea ingestion as a replacement for the anti-fungal medication prescribed. Bottom line, yes, tea has shown antifungal properties, but the research is just preliminary and not strong enough to recommend tea in any form for an established serious infection. So be a good friend and certainly drink tea and offer support but don’t hold out a remedy that is a very long way from being shown as a successful treatment.




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  11. Hi Ernie Rosseau,
    Thanks for your question. I am one of the volunteer moderators at the website. This is very interesting topic that Dr Greger has looked into. As far as your question about how much tea one should consume, In today’s video he did mention ” it turns out, not much. Just one cup of tea might have an effect, but you might have to space out multiple cups over the day, since it gets cleared out of your system within about eight hours”. So I would say it depends on tolerance of different people and one can start with one cup and build it up gradually . Also one has to consider sharing any drastic changes in their diet with their doctors in case of any medical issues.




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  12. Curing toenail fungus – This is not an ad. I tried nonprescription topical solutions for a few years, including Vicks VapoRub. Nothing worked.

    Finally two months ago I bought the ClearTouch light beam device, $189, and it is working great and fast! I’ll write a review in a few more weeks, and provide start and end photos. I did call the support phone number and was told two helps: Don’t also use topical products at the same time, and do three seasons a day, instead of the two in the guide.

    I don’t like, or have tried, oral prescription products, such as the expensive Jublia.




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  13. I would appreciate knowing how to make a 2% green tea mouthwash. Obviously I must do something other than just brew the tea.




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    1. hi Denise, actually it is as simple as brewing tea. Dr G said in one of his past green tea videos that he cold brews green tea for this purpose. Just drop one or two green tea bags in a mug of water and allow to ‘brew’ in the fridge. Or, just brew green tea to drink, and refridgerate the remainder to use as mouthwash.




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  14. After seeing this video, I remembered I have some Luzianne iced green tea (family size tea bags) and put about 4 bags in a gallon of distilled water and set it out for the sun to brew.

    Just wondering if anyone has seen any research on the difference between pot brewed and sun brewed?




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  15. Have there been any studies done on green tea antioxidants and anti-aging of the skin?

    What is the best way to make a homemade green tea moisturizer and/or facial cleanser? I’m assuming there are some store-bought versions but then I’d want to investigate the other ingredients in them… unless someone can recommend one that they’ve already researched.

    And lastly, I read on other websites that tea in bags contains a lot of “filler” ingredients so it’s not all tea, and supposedly the bag itself sometimes has chemicals on it. Is this claim true? I wasn’t really sure, but just in case,I started buying loose leaf tea… and at the very least, I can say that the loose leaf tea tastes MUCH better than the kind in the bags. However, it is also more expensive, depending on what kind of tea you buy and what store you buy it from.




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    1. Yes there have been several studies about green tea as an antioxidant for the skin when applied topically. I do not have access to them right now but if you have access to a university or other databases you can find A NUMBER of them. green tea also seems to be able to build collagen but this is less studied than its amazing antioxidant property. I will be investigating the innisfree range of green tea products. they have an entire range of products all based on green tea. but the problem is green tea may not be the active. some brands use green tea in sparing amounts (bottom of ingredient list) and then claim it as n antioxidant when at such low levels it does nothing. Another issue is the addition of fragrant essential oils like lavender, citrus, etc etc that research study after study after study all have shown these to be massive irritants and cause inflammation and collagen breakdown at deeper levels. So that is another thing to watch out. The alcohol (non fatty kind, like denatured alcohol, etc) is another ingredient that companies still keep adding despite research showing how detrimental alcohol is for the skin. witch hazel, apple cider vinegar are too acidic and basic for the skin and cause massive pH disturbances and again collagen breakdown (first step in wrinkle formation) so many ingredients to watch for and not forgetting the dreaded fragrance (even non-sensitive skin will be affected; might not see the outward symptoms but it’s happening in the underlying layers). So yeah have to carefully go through innisfree’s ingredients. but as of now, I will be making my own green tea topical. Not sure how to get the 2% strength the vid talks about and also not sure how to formulate a non-watery one (so it stays on the skin longer) maybe i will try adding glycerine and see if it holds together but stability will be a massive issue.




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    2. Okay at just a casual glance the Innisfree Green tea line is truly green tea based as the active ingredient at a 78% strength which is great! BUT it is loaded with irritating bergamot, and other citrus extracts (very high concentrations as they appear top of the list) so I will definitely be staying away as there is no point in using green tea when the offset is such potent irritants along with it. negates all the good and more. fragrance is at the very bottom so i might have given this a shot but not now after the fragrant oils + artificial fragrance just too much of the bad not good for anybody’s skin especially if anti-aging and long term benefits is the objective. the search continues.




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  16. how does one make a %2 green tea solution for a fungus skin rashes? please don’t ‘put some tea in some water… ‘ . someone stated
    “…%2 solution…” so i assume there’s some significants to the concentrations. how much tea per how much water?
    tnx,
    ams




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  17. What is green tea. Can we at least have a plant name. It is ridiculous. One place it is one thing another place it is probably a totally different plant.




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  18. How about as a topical treatment for eczema? I read somewhere that eczema is actually an internal problem that manifests on the skin surface, but I was wondering if it would help not only to drink it but to apply it topically.




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  19. What could i dive more difectly into as far as a healing process for adult acne and toe fungus? I am vegan. I consume a 100% plant-based diet, low to zero refined sugars and minimal fats. I cured it largely when going 100% plant-based, but still deal with occasional issues. I listened about the green tea but what could be my root cause? I also suffer from toe fungus on one foot, and for years have been trying to get rid of it. what could my body be telling me?




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  20. Hi Kali and thanks for your question. Nutritionally, it sounds like you are right on track for overall health. Despite optional nutrition, acne may flare up from time to time due to other factors such as sleep deprivation, stress or other hormone changes and considering these may help you to identify a cause. As for toe fungus, if it involves the nail bed then seeing a podiatrist may be your best bet as simple laser therapy could help to eradicate. Then, look at your foot wear and other regular hygiene to prevent recurrence. I hope this helps!




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