NutritionFacts.org

chicken

Research studies, including the largest prospective nutrition study ever, continue to suggest that industrial toxins such as PCBs, methylmercury, and arsenic in chicken and/or chicken eggs may increase the risk of cancer. The high-temperature cooking of bird muscles can create cancer-causing compounds. This was demonstrated in a testing of chicken products served at fast food chains. This may help explain why poultry has been associated with the risk of lymphoma (see also here). Cured chicken may also contain carcinogenic nitrosamines. Eating chicken and eggs may negatively affect emotional (see also here), mental, vascular, and hormonal health (such as the feminization of male genitalia). Genetic manipulation of chickens has led to clinically obese birds that may play a role in the human obesity epidemic because of their fat content (and maybe even their obesogenic virus content). Chicken by-products are probably not the best source of protein for infant formula.

The overuse of antibiotics in chicken and meat production is creating superbugs (see also here, here, here). Bacterial from fecal contamination of chicken presents a food safety risk, including urinary tract infections. Parasitic worms contained in fish meal fed to chickens may cause allergic reactions in those who eat the chicken. Chicken is deficient in antioxidants, phytonutrients, and fiber, while potentially containing excessive salt, flame-retardant chemicals, AGEs, arachidonic acid (see also here), paralysis-causing bacteria (that can cross-contaminate other foods and surfaces), and cancer-causing agents (including eggs). Even neurological diseases and penile cancer have been linked to poultry exposure. Chicken can provide vitamin B12, but there are safer sources.

The most recent USDA Dietary Guidelines suggest eating more fruits and vegetables and less saturated fat, for which chicken is a leading source (see the potential breast cancer survival implications here). Countries that have successfully cut saturated fat have been able to dramatically cut disease risk.

See also the related blog posts: EPA dioxin limit has National Chicken Council worried products could be declared “unfit for consumption”, Dr. Oz, apple juice, and arsenic: chicken may have 10 times more, Eating chicken may lead to a smaller penis

Topic summary contributed by Julie Correia.
To help out on the site, email volunteer@nutritionfacts.org

Watch videos about chicken

  • Illegal Drugs in Chicken Feathers
    Illegal Drugs in Chicken Feathers
    By testing chicken feathers for chemical residues, researchers aim to find out what the poultry industry is feeding their birds. The presence of banned drugs and a broad range of pharmaceuticals...
  • From Table to Able: Combating Disabling Diseases with Food
    From Table to Able: Combating Disabling Diseases with Food
    Dr. Greger has scoured the world's scholarly literature on clinical nutrition and developed this new presentation based on the latest in cutting-edge research exploring the role diet may play in...
  • Essential Tremor and Diet
    Essential Tremor and Diet
    Neurotoxins in chicken, such as the beta-carboline alkaloid harman, may explain the link between meat consumption and hand tremor, the most common movement disorder.
  • Cooking to Live Longer
    Cooking to Live Longer
    Does cooking meals at home lead to improved health outcomes? And how do TV dinners compare nutritionally to TV chef recipes?
  • Cadmium and Cancer: Plant vs. Animal Foods
    Cadmium and Cancer: Plant vs. Animal Foods
    Though the most concentrated sources of the toxic metal cadmium are cigarette smoke, seafood, and organ meats, does greater consumption from whole grains and vegetables present a concern?
  • Tick Bites, Meat Allergies, and Chronic Urticaria
    Tick Bites, Meat Allergies, and Chronic Urticaria
    The rising incidence of tick-bite induced meat allergies may account for cases of previously unexplained (“idiopathic”) persistent hives among children.
  • Cancer Risk From French Fries
    Cancer Risk From French Fries
    The association between cancer and the consumption of deep-fried foods may be due to carcinogens formed at high temperatures in animal foods (heterocyclic amines and polycyclic hydrocarbons) and...
  • Treating Asthma With Fruits and Vegetables
    Treating Asthma With Fruits and Vegetables
    Increasing fruit and vegetable consumption to seven servings a day appears to cut asthma exacerbation rates in half, whereas restricting consumption to Standard American Diet levels leads to a...
Page 1 of 1812345...10...Last »