What About Kosher & Organic Chicken?

What About Kosher & Organic Chicken?
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Comparing contamination rates for antibiotic-resistant E. coli and ExPEC bacteria that cause urinary tract infections

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Millions of Americans come down with bladder infections—urinary tract infections— every year, including more than a million children. Most cases stay in the bladder, but when the bacteria creep up into the kidneys, or get into the bloodstream, things can get serious. Thankfully, we have antibiotics. But there is now a pandemic of a new multi-drug resistant strain of E. coli. Discovered just in 2008, and now this so-called ST131 strain went from unknown to a leading cause of bladder infections the world over, resistant to even some of our 2nd and 3rd line antibiotics.  And it’s been found in chicken, retail chicken breasts sampled from across the country, documenting a “persisting reservoir of extensively antimicrobial-resistant ExPEC [bacteria],” the extra-intestinal pathogenic E. coli—including the ST131 strain—”in retail chicken products in the United States, suggesting a potential public health threat.”

See, urinary tract infections may be foodborne, by which they mean predominantly poultry—chicken and turkey—and so, maybe we shouldn’t be feeding antibiotics to these animals by the ton in poultry production. But wait, foodborne bladder infections? What are you doing with that drumstick? No, eating contaminated chicken can lead to the colonization of the rectum with these bacteria that can then, even months later, crawl up into the bladder to cause an infection.

“The problem of increasing [anti-microbial resistance] is so dire that some experts are predicting that the era of antibiotics may be coming to an end,…ushering in a ‘post-antibiotic era,’ in which common infections and minor injuries can [once again] kill.” More than 80 percent of E. coli isolated from beef, pork, and poultry “exhibited resistance” to at least one antibiotic, and more than half from poultry were resistant to five different drugs. One of the ways this happens is that viruses, called bacteriophages, can transfer antibiotic resistance genes between bacteria. About a quarter of these viruses isolated from chicken meat were found “able to transduce” antibiotic drug resistance into E. coli. And one of the big problems with this is that “disinfectants used to kill bacteria are, in many cases, not able to eliminate these [viruses].” Some of these viruses are even resistant to bleach at the kinds of concentrations used in the food industry; and likewise, alcohol, which is what you find in many hand sanitizers, also unable to harm most of them.

The irony is that the industry has tried to intentionally feed these viruses to chickens. Why would they do that? It can boost egg production in hens, and increase body weight gain in broiler chickens to get them to slaughter weight faster. The only thing that seems to dissuade the industry is if anything affects the taste of the meat. That’s why the industry had to stop spraying chickens with benzene to try to kill off all the parasites. The meat ended up with “a distasteful flavor,” described as “strong, acidic, musty, medicinal, biting, objectionable,” and….hmm, tasty.

But, what if you buy organic chicken? For another type of bacteria, enterococcus, antibiotic-resistant bugs were found in both conventional and organically raised chicken, but were less common in organic. Only about one in three contaminated with drug-resistant bugs, compared to nearly one in two. But in a study of hundreds of prepackaged retail chicken breasts tested from 99 grocery stores, being labeled organic or antibiotic-free did not seem to impact the contamination levels of antibiotic-resistant E. coli from fresh retail chicken, though purchasing meat from natural food stores appeared to be safer, regardless of how it was labeled.

Kosher chicken appeared to be the worst, nearly twice the level of antibiotic-resistant E. coli contamination compared to conventional, which goes against the whole concept of kosher. No difference in drug resistance between the E. coli swabbed from conventional chicken versus organic and raised-without-antibiotics- chicken, but either way, kosher was worse. But how could organic and raised-without-antibiotics-chicken not be better? Well, it could be cross-contamination at the slaughter plants; so, bugs just jump from one to the other.

Or, it could be the organic chicken loophole. USDA organic standards prohibits the use of antibiotics in poultry “starting on day two of the animal’s life. This is an important loophole,” since even antibiotics “considered critical for human health” are “routinely injected” into one-day-old chicks and eggs, which has been directly associated with antibiotic-resistant foodborne infections.

And, there was no difference in the presence of ExPEC bacteria between organic and conventional, the bacteria implicated in urinary tract infections. “These findings suggest that retail chicken products in the United States, even if they are labeled ‘organic,’ pose a potential health threat to consumers because they are contaminated with extensively antibiotic-resistant…E. coli.” And even if we were able to get the poultry industry to stop using antibiotics, the contamination of chicken meat with ExPEC bacteria could still remain a threat.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Dr Graham Beards via Wikipedia. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Millions of Americans come down with bladder infections—urinary tract infections— every year, including more than a million children. Most cases stay in the bladder, but when the bacteria creep up into the kidneys, or get into the bloodstream, things can get serious. Thankfully, we have antibiotics. But there is now a pandemic of a new multi-drug resistant strain of E. coli. Discovered just in 2008, and now this so-called ST131 strain went from unknown to a leading cause of bladder infections the world over, resistant to even some of our 2nd and 3rd line antibiotics.  And it’s been found in chicken, retail chicken breasts sampled from across the country, documenting a “persisting reservoir of extensively antimicrobial-resistant ExPEC [bacteria],” the extra-intestinal pathogenic E. coli—including the ST131 strain—”in retail chicken products in the United States, suggesting a potential public health threat.”

See, urinary tract infections may be foodborne, by which they mean predominantly poultry—chicken and turkey—and so, maybe we shouldn’t be feeding antibiotics to these animals by the ton in poultry production. But wait, foodborne bladder infections? What are you doing with that drumstick? No, eating contaminated chicken can lead to the colonization of the rectum with these bacteria that can then, even months later, crawl up into the bladder to cause an infection.

“The problem of increasing [anti-microbial resistance] is so dire that some experts are predicting that the era of antibiotics may be coming to an end,…ushering in a ‘post-antibiotic era,’ in which common infections and minor injuries can [once again] kill.” More than 80 percent of E. coli isolated from beef, pork, and poultry “exhibited resistance” to at least one antibiotic, and more than half from poultry were resistant to five different drugs. One of the ways this happens is that viruses, called bacteriophages, can transfer antibiotic resistance genes between bacteria. About a quarter of these viruses isolated from chicken meat were found “able to transduce” antibiotic drug resistance into E. coli. And one of the big problems with this is that “disinfectants used to kill bacteria are, in many cases, not able to eliminate these [viruses].” Some of these viruses are even resistant to bleach at the kinds of concentrations used in the food industry; and likewise, alcohol, which is what you find in many hand sanitizers, also unable to harm most of them.

The irony is that the industry has tried to intentionally feed these viruses to chickens. Why would they do that? It can boost egg production in hens, and increase body weight gain in broiler chickens to get them to slaughter weight faster. The only thing that seems to dissuade the industry is if anything affects the taste of the meat. That’s why the industry had to stop spraying chickens with benzene to try to kill off all the parasites. The meat ended up with “a distasteful flavor,” described as “strong, acidic, musty, medicinal, biting, objectionable,” and….hmm, tasty.

But, what if you buy organic chicken? For another type of bacteria, enterococcus, antibiotic-resistant bugs were found in both conventional and organically raised chicken, but were less common in organic. Only about one in three contaminated with drug-resistant bugs, compared to nearly one in two. But in a study of hundreds of prepackaged retail chicken breasts tested from 99 grocery stores, being labeled organic or antibiotic-free did not seem to impact the contamination levels of antibiotic-resistant E. coli from fresh retail chicken, though purchasing meat from natural food stores appeared to be safer, regardless of how it was labeled.

Kosher chicken appeared to be the worst, nearly twice the level of antibiotic-resistant E. coli contamination compared to conventional, which goes against the whole concept of kosher. No difference in drug resistance between the E. coli swabbed from conventional chicken versus organic and raised-without-antibiotics- chicken, but either way, kosher was worse. But how could organic and raised-without-antibiotics-chicken not be better? Well, it could be cross-contamination at the slaughter plants; so, bugs just jump from one to the other.

Or, it could be the organic chicken loophole. USDA organic standards prohibits the use of antibiotics in poultry “starting on day two of the animal’s life. This is an important loophole,” since even antibiotics “considered critical for human health” are “routinely injected” into one-day-old chicks and eggs, which has been directly associated with antibiotic-resistant foodborne infections.

And, there was no difference in the presence of ExPEC bacteria between organic and conventional, the bacteria implicated in urinary tract infections. “These findings suggest that retail chicken products in the United States, even if they are labeled ‘organic,’ pose a potential health threat to consumers because they are contaminated with extensively antibiotic-resistant…E. coli.” And even if we were able to get the poultry industry to stop using antibiotics, the contamination of chicken meat with ExPEC bacteria could still remain a threat.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Dr Graham Beards via Wikipedia. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Doctor's Note

Wait, Urinary Tract Infections from Eating Chicken? Check out the video!

Here’s another one on reducing your risk: How to Shop for, Handle, & Store Chicken

Can’t you just cook the meat through? I mean, who eats undercooked chicken? See Food Poisoning Bacteria Cross-Contamination for why millions continue to be sickened every year.

I’ve done some other organic meat vids if you’re interested. See, for example, Superbugs in Conventional vs. Organic Chicken and How Much Lead Is in Organic Chicken Soup (Bone Broth)?

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

85 responses to “What About Kosher & Organic Chicken?

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  1. Mr Greger, can you please make a video on grass fed? people seem to think feeding an animal grass instead of grain transforms its trans fats/saturated fats and cholesterol and endotoxins and so on into healthy versions for whatever reason.

    1. The DJ, well put!! I try to tell people about the dangers of trans fats in any amount and they always come back with “not grass fed though” … definitely hope Dr. Greger comes out with a video addressing this. Great suggestion.

  2. I learned from a brilliant botanist named John Kimme that there are over eight thousand edible plants and the average person eats less than 32 of them in their lifetimes. How many flavors and textures of amazing have they missed? As more and more people make a token effort to eat healthier it seems eating more chicken and less red meat is as far as they go.

  3. To the NF team please put the Latin name for the plants because when translating the name of some berries I had to go via Wikipedia getting the Latin name to look up the common English name and there isn’t always an article, it would make things so much easier for the foreigners. Thanks!
    Is there an update on the healthiest lentil, where do black lentils stand ?can one assume that the red ones are the best just like red rice is better than black rice? Or are they very different,if they are please explain why…I’m curious about your reasoning

  4. To quote from this article, “What are you doing with that drumstick?” This is an extremely poor attempt at humor. The author of this statement brings a cloud of in appropriateness and very poor judgement to an otherwise important and well written essay. PLEASE have your editors screen such commentary out of future articles. If I see any such language, innuendos or poor taste, I will stop recommending your materials to family, friends and colleagues.

    1. Well… This website is way too valuable to me to boycott, but I agree that some of the double entendres are a little more disturbing to me than humorous. I realize I’m just one data point with an opinion, but there might be others out there who would prefer not to cloud a valuable and enlightening study (antibiotic resistant bacteria in chicken) with provocative humor.

      1. Dr. λ, Creator of Variables, Binder of Variables, Applicator of Terms, Checker of Types, β-Reducer of β-Redexes

        Your user name is so entertaining that I already forgot the question.

    2. Oh, the humanity! ! !
      Much better taste: “What are you doing with that celery stick?”

      Faux outrage aside here’s a serious question:
      Wouldn’t cooking chicken longer and at high temps kill all the present pathogens?
      (theoretical for me since I quit eating chicken years ago. Still succumb to the occasional well cooked hotdog though).

    3. “. If I see any such language, innuendos or poor taste, I will stop recommending your materials to family, friends and colleagues.”

      I guess no place is safe from the hypersensitive, SJW perma-victim, offended by the tiniest things type of person.

      Keep learning, Alan Ando, but don’t tell people how to deliver their message. How about you just listen to the message.

      Also consider how much harm you will cause if you stopped sharing these videos because you can’t stomach a tiny bit of humor now and then that you don’t appreciate.

      These videos can encourage people to change their health or even get them on a path to saving their life, but oh no. They might not find out about them because you can’t handle a little off-color joke now and again.

      Well that and who didn’t ask themselves, “What is happening with that drum stick that then gives some people bladder infections and UTIs?!?”

      How can you not think that the question is not legitimate to ask? If someone told you that eating meat can give you a bladder infection wouldn’t that peak your interest as to how or why?

    4. Alan,

      I understand that you are upset and Having standards isn’t a bad thing, but it is a genuine question, which I can guarantee was asked by scientists as they tried to figure out the answer of how it worked.

      Dr Greger doesn’t swear or use profanity or nudity or anything overt. The example you gave was one of his walked up to the line, but he was using it because he had to link food to what is happening in the urinary track and bladder. His joke is illustrating that most people can’t mentally conceive that food would be linked to either of those.

      He chose humor to make the link. Honestly, I would be wondering if it was from wiping with chicken hands after going to the bathroom.

      Mentally I did not have a concept that UTI could be linked with food.

    5. “. If I see any such language, innuendos or poor taste, I will stop recommending your materials to family, friends and colleagues.”

      If you don’t like it you could always go and read every bit of nutrition research published and start your own educational website. No? That’s way too much work? Dr. Greger and the rest of us who aren’t Victorian era prudes actually enjoy a bit of levity along with their science.

      Don’t ever stop Dr. Greger and team! For every one person who finds the humor distasteful, there are fifty who keep coming to the website because the presentations are so fun, pithy, and witty!

      1. LOL Chris and I agree adios Alan– Dr. Greger is funny and thank God for that and

        P.S. Our Creator loves humor… especially to get your attention

        A little girl less than 2 years old just got out of the hospital after 3 days with a urinary tract infection.

        Use all the humor you want just keep the info coming Dr Greger you are doing a great job just be yourself.

        You cannot please everyone so just be authentic.

    6. I actually thought the drum stick thing was hilarious, it caught me off guard and I had to rewind the video because my amusement and shock had distracted me. I love Dr. Greger’s innuendoes and jokes. This was not in poor taste and wasn’t vulgar or anything, it was just vague joke. Maybe it wasn’t for you as not everyone appreciates the same humor, but just because something isn’t for you doesn’t mean that it’s bad or wrong and it should be altered according to YOUR preferences… Come on people.

      1. Oh, and btw, thanks for boosting my immune system with your jokes, Dr. Greger and Team! In case anyone missed THAT video, laughter (as well as being moved emotionally) does so :)

  5. Thanks for making the videos that you do. I don’t agree with going vegan, but I do agree to not eat as much processed foods and eat mostly fruit and veg.

    Can I just state one pet peeve? You try to sound conversational and kind of flabbergasted and emphatic in your videos… it just sounds irritating. It’s overacted. Sorry, I’d have to think I’m not the only one. Anyway, thanks for your hard work!

    1. 4lph4b3t, we find Dr. Greger extremely amusing and entertaining. We now chant in our household: “until….they put it to the test!” or “until now!” This information can be extremely dry and dusty. I used to read scientific articles aloud to my infant daughter — they put us both right to sleep!! Even though I found the subject matter deeply interesting.

      1. Dr. J.

        I am with you.

        Dr. Greger is so entertaining that I come here every single day.

        I enjoy the other doctors, and use them when I research topics, but I am here for the silly jokes and laugh even harder when it is over-acting.

        1. Dr. Greger,

          You are the only doctor I visit every single day.

          My dog is alive because of this process and I am counting on figuring out how to keep my brother alive.

      2. “I used to read scientific articles aloud to my infant daughter”

        Hahah, Dr. J I am the same way. I will be reading something on pubmed and I’ll be fascinated by the information but after a while I get sleepy because the language is just SO dry…

    2. 4lph… or whatever your name is, Dr. Greger is being himself. Most of us enjoy it. Maybe don’t nitpick people’s PERSONALITIES… I mean, what might we think of yours?

    1. david king, and Irene,

      you were both asking similar questions. Having seen Dr Greger’s previous videos on chicken (WARNING !! there is humor in this one !) https://nutritionfacts.org/video/how-to-shop-for-handle-and-store-chicken/ I will no longer allow chicken in the house. During one of the experiments, the scientists could not effectivelyclean the kitchen after handling chicken. For similar reasons, I use the wipes at the store to clean the shopping cart handle, and bag produce (wish I didnt have to do that) so that it doesnt sit on the cashier’s conveyor. There are more links under Doctor’s notes.

      1. thanks
        But my question was about cooking / baking (not handling and storage)
        Does this heat kill all bacteria, viruses, antibiotics, etc.?

        1. david king, cooking to the correct internal temperatures will kill bacteria but Dr Greger has mentioned the problems with relying on cooking to make poultry safe. First, over 70% of consumers failed to cook the meat to safe internal temps, and in fact didn’t use a thermometer to make sure. Secondly, freezing does not kill bacteria/viruses so frozen meat has to be handled as carefully as raw. And lastly, while you may sit down to a relatively pathogen-free chicken dinner, research teams has discovered how almost impossible it is to clean the kitchen prep area, fridge, sink etc from the chicken raw juices and cross contamination.

        2. Fecal bacteria like E coli is killed by proper cooking. Most but not all viruses are killed by proper cooking. The kitchen environment is easily contaminated by fecal bacteria and viruses. Most of these pathogens are killed by cleaning with bleach, but some viruses survive even bleach.

          The problem with antibiotic use is that when they are routinely fed to animals, the animals’ bacteria develop means to resist the antibiotics. The bacteria that have become resistant continue to infect the animal, and these resistant organisms can then be ingested by humans who eat the animals. Antibiotic resistant infections are difficult to treat. Cooking the meat to high temperatures will generally kill most of these bacteria as well, but again the kitchen can become contaminated and this can be difficult to address completely.

          Dr Anderson, Health Support Volunteer

  6. Let’s face it, many doctors are arrogant and greedy and look down on their patients as ignorant and helpless. They delight in using Latin terms for simple concepts just to exercise their arrogance. What is the old joke again: What is the difference between God and a doctor? God doesn’t think he’s a doctor!

    Dr. Greger breaks that stereotype. His humor and sincerity are more than refreshing, they are real. He’s an actual human (I met him at a talk, shook his hand, he’s the real thing) and he really is trying to make the world a better place by empowering people to help themselves with this information. He’s certainly doesn’t appear to be for the money or the fame, he’s all heart. Isn’t that what doctors should be? He’s a breath of fresh air in a field full of government officials and arrogant academics/practitioners!

    Besides, I find his humor makes the dietary information he provides us to be more digestible – pun intended!

    Thank you Dr. Greger and team nutritionfacts.org. I love you all and deeply appreciate your good work.

    1. Somewhat agree… except my GP and (most of) the specialists he has recommended over the years have all been wonderful. Competent, compassionnate, honest doctors still exist. What’s criminal is that they seem to get “misled” by Big Pharma, double-crossed by regulators, and hamstrung by corporate beaurocrats. I’ve trusted my GP for more than 30 years – since he first began practice after med school! – and I dread the day he decides it’s time to retire.

    2. Jonareno, Your description of Dr Greger and his mission is very well stated. I also agree with Edie Postiglione that there are some well-meaning, humble MD’s, but from my experience, they are definitely in the minority.

      What I do find puzzling is how some commenters (eg. Alan Ando), who show up on this website every once in a while, have the audacity to criticize Dr Greger for his presentation style, when he works so hard to give everyone valid, life-saving, information for free, no less!!! Dr G has always welcomed constructive criticism. But to threaten to deny good information to one’s friends and family because of a presentation “style” issue, makes me seriously question the person’s value system.

  7. I just sent this video to my best friend since 1970, begging her for the umpteenth time to please STOP eating chicken! She has been getting antibiotic-resistant UTIs about once a month for the last TWO YEARS! A while back, she was hospitalized for 10 days, given the strongest antibiotics available, and nearly died. She is now waiting for a CT, fearing ovarian cancer is the cause of her UTIs and other issues. However, I am still holding out hope that it is, indeed, the chicken, which she has yet to give up, that is the source of her problems.

    Thank you, Dr. Greger, for this EXCELLENT video. I hope this does the trick.

    And people, get a grip! Dr. Greger’s humor always brings a smile to my face, and often true laughter, as this last one did. How wonderful to laugh, when I’ve been so very worried for so long about my friend. (For the record, I’m 71).

  8. As an MD, I carefully examined all the data determining if an infection was bacterial and when not life threatening trying to use cultures identifying bacteria and the simplest antibiotics to use. In life threatening infections that information suggested were bacterial, we cultured first then started the most likely broad spectrum antibiotics deemed appropriate. There are physicians who do not take these precautions but for years the pharmaceutical industry and their shills led the public to believe that most antibiotic resistance was soley due to careless physicians before we learned that most antibiotics(more than 86%) were being fed to animals, not for infection, but for growth and appearance purposes. It’s all about the dollar not human health and safety.

  9. Good grief, some of you are so uptight. This is the single best website for researched based nutrition ever and it’s FREE! Thank you to all of the staff at NF! I love all of your work, it’s not only informative but fun to watch and listen to. DO NOT change a thing!

    1. From my experience, eggs seem to be ok. I used to get UTIs, but not a single one in the last 12 years that I’ve been absolutely, never giving-in-except-for-an-occasional-salmon-caught-by-my-neighbor, vegetarin. I have an egg for breakfast most mornings.

      1. Dick 40, — more than a hundred thousand Americans are salmonella-poisoned every year from eggs. — https://nutritionfacts.org/video/flashback-friday-who-says-eggs-arent-healthy-or-safe/

        Ok, that sounds sickening to me!!

        btw, Salmonella poisoning is a GI disease, not a UTI, as far as I know. And, as Barb wrote above: “I have to say I am shocked that there is no such thing as 24 hr flu. I guess I was poisoned as a child many many times lol. “

  10. What does Dr. Greger mean that it goes against the whole idea of kosher? A kosher chicken has been slaughtered in a distinct manner and the chicken is then checked for any flaws internally- this is all according to laws passed down from Sinai. With all due respect, does Dr. Greger know anything about the laws of Kashrus?

    1. Yael,

      Those are someone else’s words, not Dr. Greger’s, even though he is reading them and comes from a Jewish background and may well understand the religious verses regarding the laws of Kashrus.

      The person who wrote the sentences specified “historic” rather than “religious” and having the meat be twice as unsafe certainly does violate the safety practices which the industry selling Kosher foods was seen as standing for.

      1. I always thought of Kosher food as safer and used to buy it for the word “Kosher” not being Jewish or a Christian back then.

        My Jewish friends eat Kosher and I just trusted spiritual communities more than secular to try to do the right thing.

        I understand that Yael is right that Kosher spiritually is part of a religious debate within the Jewish and Christian communities of whether God cared whether the food was safe or not versus whether He just wanted obedience. Some groups within the communities see it as for safety. Others for moral reasons and others believe that we cannot know what He meant and that it is just about obedience by faith.

        Either way, I always thought that the Kosher food handling practices were better than standard food handling practices and respected that.

        Strange to hear that it isn’t true.

        1. I wonder if Kosher used to be safer or if it is just impossible to keep things like meat safe enough?

          I say that because I remember hearing that the contemporary scholars theorized that the Jewish community was distrusted during the Black Death because they had better hygiene and didn’t get sick from the Black Death as often as part of the reason there was persecution.

          Their theory, not mine, but it was part of my having a respect for the Jewish community in that area.

          The Jewish friends and relatives who I interact with are genuinely some of the most disciplined people I have met in my life and they would be who I would think of if I read the sentence “Cleanliness is next to godliness.”

  11. I am happy that a significant health threat has not yet been stated for eating dry red kidney beans after they have been properly boiled. God Bless

  12. It doesn’t feel like Christmas to me. Having my brother be sick and not having him understand the importance of diet is such a weight on my soul.

    Also, I found a broken part of my brain or maybe just narrowed to it. Both Thanksgiving and Christmas, I failed at the meals I spend weeks preparing for. I pondered it today. I succeeded at finding recipes and at buying ingredients and in chopping the ingredients and so many steps of the process, but I failed to pull things together and ended up doing alternative dishes at the last minute each holiday. I have serious brain problems at implementation and I don’t even understand it. I can cognitively understand all of it, except for why I can’t pull things together.

    1. I gave myself 5 hours to do something which the book would call a 45-minute process and I failed and I did the same thing on Thanksgiving. I am going to be working on it, but my brain really is still so seriously broken and I am so broken hearted about my brother.

      Can cancer be healed without changing the diet at all? Can it?

      1. of course cancer can be healed without changing diet. BUT if one wanted the best chances you take all possible approaches – traditional therapy,  diet, exercise, relaxation & meditation, anything else that lowers stress.
        You do it all but diet is for sure the simplest and quickest change that one can make. It starts with the very next meal.
        Look around at lots of nutrition facts videos on cancers and you will find lots of great information on foods, spices, herbs, and other compounds and nutrients in various things that appear to fight cancer, slow the spread of, etc.
        To start now, think herbs and spices (turmeric, ginger, garlic, onions), all colors of fruits (berries especially), and lots of calciferous vegetables. But, continue to do research and whomever you need to share videos with, do. Hammer the message.

  13. This is NFO’s scariest video to date.

    Historically deadly pathogens have always been around. Today’s human-made superbugs are particularly frightening for humanity.

    Even followers (I’m age 70 male) of Dr.G’s advice risk daily contact. Shopping carts, restaurants, doctor’s offices, home cross-contamination etc. are unavoidable. Knowledge & diligence are indispensable to attenuate some of the risks.

    I remain hopeful in being proactive while following Dr.G’s WFPB & lifestyle management advice. He consistently & lucidly delivers.

    P.S. Dr.G keep up the humor, Your fails are often funniest.

  14. Anton, . . that’s an interesting question. I would also like to know if other countries have the same challenges with bacteria in chickens as we do in this country. Although I don’t partake any longer, the fact is that the bacteria is in our world and can be transmitted easily. Consider this scenario: One who doesn’t disinfect their own kitchen and then goes to the grocery store can transmit these bacteria to the cart or anything else that they touch in the grocery store. Or anywhere else they choose to go that day. So this is definitely a public health issue. It makes hand washing more important than ever.

    I’d like to also point out that Dr. Greger’s video states that the worrisome bacteriophage is not killed with 70% alcohol or sodium hypochlorite used in the food industry. But if one stops the video at 2:30 and reads the next line, one sees that peracetic acid does kill bacteriophage. I’m going to guess that most food industry doesn’t use that product, I don’t know. I think it’s important to know that one can use this product in their home to insure your own best chance at killing bacteriophage that you don’t want hanging around. Here is what I found about peracetic acid:

    Peracetic acid is a much weaker acid than the parent acetic acid, with a pKa of 8. 2. Peracetic acid is an ideal antimicrobial agent due to its high oxidizing potential. It is broadly effective against microorganisms and is not deactivated by catalase and peroxidase, the enzymes that break down hydrogen peroxide.

    If anyone knows how to use this in the home kitchen, I would be interested in that information. Thanks!!

  15. Hi Dr. Greger, I wonder if you could do a video that covers the new antibiotics that are being developed and whether some of these are being designed to combat antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Thanks and Merry Christmas!

  16. Yikes! I’ve been inclined to eating organic chicken, hoping it was more or less safe. Need to cut back now.

    Seconding Anton Rohrer’s point, it would be great to get some info on imported chicken, especially in the light of Chinese imports now.
    Btw, I always enjoy Dr. Greger’s humor.

    Dmitriy P,
    Shilajit Secret

  17. What about the safety of chicken (or even other meats) that have been marinaded in vinegar? I did this with balsamic vinegar when I would open one of those cans of chicken breast, and a tin of tuna the same.

    Just wondering if there have been any studies that not only study any germ reduction but nutrition changes as well

    1. Shilajit and Lonie,

      Those are great questions!

      My brother having Cancer and not being Vegan, I appreciate learning these things.

      Having him not get infections will be important.

      I am going to want to tell him to water fast every weekend if he can’t do WFPB.

  18. How to ask questions on live q&as? I can’t watch the videos live because of time zone issues. Some questions to ask. Are there any foods that inhibit TMAO? Omega-6 oils cause atherosclerosis because they form AGEs with LDL cholesterol and make it oxidised. How about whole food sources? Roasted nuts and seeds? Nuts and seeds that have gone rancid? How about soy based products? Processing of soy requires boiling the beans for 4 hours normally. 20 minutes at 15lb pressure if pressure cooked.

  19. There’s a story in the Bible—the Old Testament I think—where God sent the people mana (a heavenly bread) to feed them. The mana could feed them, but the people were unsatisfied and demanded quail. So God sent them quail but they were plagued with pestilence as a consequence.
    After learning about the science behind our diets, I’ve thought about this story many times and this video in particular brings it to mind. I’m not going off on any religious tangents but just sharing the thoughts this video evokes.

  20. I need help! I have not only non-vegans jumping on me, but a vegan as well! I stated that chicken was where Americans are getting most of their fat due to the fact that Americans eat so much chicken and it is high in fat. I could swear that statement was made by Dr. Greger in a video. However, I cannot find that video again!
    First off, do I have that fact right? Second, can you point me to the video that says it?
    Thank you!

  21. Hi Barb,

    I am a volunteer for Dr. Greger. Thank you so much for your question.

    Chicken, to the best of my knowledge, is not where Americans are getting most of their fat. Dr. Greger has said things about chicken being one of the leading contributors to saturated fat and cholesterol intakes in the American diet. This video (https://nutritionfacts.org/video/trans-fat-saturated-fat-and-cholesterol-tolerable-upper-intake-of-zero/) shows that chicken is the 4th highest source of saturated fat and the 2nd highest source of cholesterol in the American diet.

    Overall, we should not be so concerned with eating fat, necessarily. We should be more concerned with the TYPES of fats that we consume, and what comes along with them. For example, nuts, seeds, and avocados have favorable fat profiles, while also having other beneficial nutrients. Beef and chicken have a less favorable fat profile, along with animal protein and potentially hormones, etc. Fish has a more favorable fat profile, but also contains animal protein and mercury. Olive or walnut oils may also have favorable fat profiles, but have little to no nutritional value otherwise. Therefore, nuts, seeds, and avocados are the most preferred sources of fat.

    I hope this helps answer your question. Best wishes!

  22. Thanks for the information, Cody and ADJ! I know I didn’t dream what I read, but perhaps it was from another source and they were just looking at the amounts of chicken Americans eat – much more than cheese for most people, and that way, perhaps, they surmised that most of Americans’ fat came from chicken. However, I will be satisfied with what is in these videos and charts. Thanks!

  23. ADJ’s chart seems to counter even that idea that I just posted, since the chart shows cumulative contribution percentages. I don’t know where I read it, but I will have to get it out of my head!
    Oh, with those nut sources, Jeff Nelson has some videos out saying the nut industry did a lot of faulty studies about nuts, so I am still going to eat those in smaller amounts.

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