Where Does the Arsenic in Chicken Come From?

Where Does the Arsenic in Chicken Come From?
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What was the National Chicken Council’s response to public health authorities calling for the industry to stop feeding arsenic-based drugs to poultry?

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

“Dietary practices influence [our] exposure to pesticides, [toxic heavy] metals,…and industrial pollutants… A diet high in fish and [other] animal products, for example, results in greater exposure to [these pollutants] than does a [more] plant-based diet, because these compounds [may] …accumulate up the food chain.” Researchers at UC Davis analyzed the diets of children and adults in California to see just how bad things have gotten.

“Cancer benchmark levels were exceeded by all children (100% [of children tested]) for arsenic, [the banned pesticides] dieldrin [and DDT metabolite] DDE, [as well as] dioxins”—and not just by a little. More than a hundred times the acceptable daily exposure for arsenic in preschoolers, school-age children, parents, and older adults. About ten times the acceptable levels for these various pesticides, and up to a thousand times the daily dose for dioxins. Where are all these toxins coming from?

The #1 source of dioxins in the diets of Californian preschoolers, kids, parents, and grandparents appears to be dairy, dairy, dairy, dairy; followed by meat, then white potatoes, refined grains, mushrooms, poultry, fish.

Our DDT legacy these days is also mostly from dairy. Dieldrin was created as a safer alternative to DDT, but was banned two years later, in 1974, though it’s still found in our bodies—mostly thanks to dairy, meat, and, evidently, cucumbers.

Chlordane made it into the 80s before being banned, though we’re still exposed through dairy (and cukes). Lead is also, foodwise, mostly from dairy and mercury—not surprisingly, mostly from tuna and other seafood. But arsenic in children was surprising—mostly from chicken, in children. Why?

Let me tell you “a tale of” arsenic in chicken. Arsenic “is well known as a poison by anyone who reads mysteries or the history of the Borgias.” “[W]ith its long and colorful history, arsenic is not something that people want in their food.” So, when a biostats student went to the USDA 17 years ago “in search of a project” for his master’s degree, he decided to look into it. What he found was this “startling difference…” Arsenic levels in chicken were like three times that of other meats. His veterinary colleagues were like, “Duh,” though. I mean, don’t you know we feed four different types of arsenic-containing antibiotic drugs to poultry? Since, you know, like 1944.

So, “[w]hile arsenic-based drugs have been fed to poultry since the…40s, recognition of this source of exposure for humans only occurred after [this student churned through] the data.” It was published in 2004, expanded upon in 2006. The National Chicken Council was none too pleased, saying lots of foods are contaminated with arsenic. “By focusing specifically on chicken, the [Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy] makes it clear that” their true objective is to force chicken “producers to stop using these safe and effective products”—by which they mean these arsenic-containing drugs, which they admit to using, but say, don’t worry they use organic arsenic, “not the inorganic form made infamous in ‘Arsenic and Old Lace'”—that is, apparently, until you cook it. When you cook chicken, it appears some of the arsenic drug in the meat turns into the Arsenic and Old Lace variety.

So, the ‘‘Poison-Free Poultry Act of 2009’’ was introduced into Congress. You can tell how well that did, based on the subsequent introduction of the ‘‘Poison-Free Poultry Act of 2011,” to which they said poison-poor poultry? Pish posh. And so, in 2013, a coalition of nine groups got together and sued the FDA, and by December 31, 2015, all arsenic-containing poultry drugs were withdrawn. So, as of 2016, arsenic will no longer be fed to chickens. The bad news is that without the arsenic-containing drug roxarsone, chicken may lose some of its “appealing pink color.”

In the end, the poultry industry only got away with exposing the American public to arsenic for 72 years. “It should be noted that the European Union [had] never approved [such] drugs” in the first place, saying hmm, feed our animals arsenic? No thanks; nein danke; no grazie; non merci.

Europe also long since banned the “urgent threat to human health” posed by feeding farm animals millions of pounds of human antibiotics—a problem that gets worse every year, instead of better, feeding chickens en masse literally tons of drugs like tetracyclines and penicillins to fatten them faster, dating back to 1951, when drug companies whipped out the ALL CAPS to promise big PROFITS—a dangerous practice the poultry industry has gotten away with for 66 years, and counting.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Pixabay. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

“Dietary practices influence [our] exposure to pesticides, [toxic heavy] metals,…and industrial pollutants… A diet high in fish and [other] animal products, for example, results in greater exposure to [these pollutants] than does a [more] plant-based diet, because these compounds [may] …accumulate up the food chain.” Researchers at UC Davis analyzed the diets of children and adults in California to see just how bad things have gotten.

“Cancer benchmark levels were exceeded by all children (100% [of children tested]) for arsenic, [the banned pesticides] dieldrin [and DDT metabolite] DDE, [as well as] dioxins”—and not just by a little. More than a hundred times the acceptable daily exposure for arsenic in preschoolers, school-age children, parents, and older adults. About ten times the acceptable levels for these various pesticides, and up to a thousand times the daily dose for dioxins. Where are all these toxins coming from?

The #1 source of dioxins in the diets of Californian preschoolers, kids, parents, and grandparents appears to be dairy, dairy, dairy, dairy; followed by meat, then white potatoes, refined grains, mushrooms, poultry, fish.

Our DDT legacy these days is also mostly from dairy. Dieldrin was created as a safer alternative to DDT, but was banned two years later, in 1974, though it’s still found in our bodies—mostly thanks to dairy, meat, and, evidently, cucumbers.

Chlordane made it into the 80s before being banned, though we’re still exposed through dairy (and cukes). Lead is also, foodwise, mostly from dairy and mercury—not surprisingly, mostly from tuna and other seafood. But arsenic in children was surprising—mostly from chicken, in children. Why?

Let me tell you “a tale of” arsenic in chicken. Arsenic “is well known as a poison by anyone who reads mysteries or the history of the Borgias.” “[W]ith its long and colorful history, arsenic is not something that people want in their food.” So, when a biostats student went to the USDA 17 years ago “in search of a project” for his master’s degree, he decided to look into it. What he found was this “startling difference…” Arsenic levels in chicken were like three times that of other meats. His veterinary colleagues were like, “Duh,” though. I mean, don’t you know we feed four different types of arsenic-containing antibiotic drugs to poultry? Since, you know, like 1944.

So, “[w]hile arsenic-based drugs have been fed to poultry since the…40s, recognition of this source of exposure for humans only occurred after [this student churned through] the data.” It was published in 2004, expanded upon in 2006. The National Chicken Council was none too pleased, saying lots of foods are contaminated with arsenic. “By focusing specifically on chicken, the [Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy] makes it clear that” their true objective is to force chicken “producers to stop using these safe and effective products”—by which they mean these arsenic-containing drugs, which they admit to using, but say, don’t worry they use organic arsenic, “not the inorganic form made infamous in ‘Arsenic and Old Lace'”—that is, apparently, until you cook it. When you cook chicken, it appears some of the arsenic drug in the meat turns into the Arsenic and Old Lace variety.

So, the ‘‘Poison-Free Poultry Act of 2009’’ was introduced into Congress. You can tell how well that did, based on the subsequent introduction of the ‘‘Poison-Free Poultry Act of 2011,” to which they said poison-poor poultry? Pish posh. And so, in 2013, a coalition of nine groups got together and sued the FDA, and by December 31, 2015, all arsenic-containing poultry drugs were withdrawn. So, as of 2016, arsenic will no longer be fed to chickens. The bad news is that without the arsenic-containing drug roxarsone, chicken may lose some of its “appealing pink color.”

In the end, the poultry industry only got away with exposing the American public to arsenic for 72 years. “It should be noted that the European Union [had] never approved [such] drugs” in the first place, saying hmm, feed our animals arsenic? No thanks; nein danke; no grazie; non merci.

Europe also long since banned the “urgent threat to human health” posed by feeding farm animals millions of pounds of human antibiotics—a problem that gets worse every year, instead of better, feeding chickens en masse literally tons of drugs like tetracyclines and penicillins to fatten them faster, dating back to 1951, when drug companies whipped out the ALL CAPS to promise big PROFITS—a dangerous practice the poultry industry has gotten away with for 66 years, and counting.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Pixabay. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

85 responses to “Where Does the Arsenic in Chicken Come From?

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  1. This video states that chicken was the #1 cause of increased levels dioxin levels in the the California children in adults, even more
    so than fish. Is this because they eat way more chicken then fish, or is it because there are far more dioxins in chicken than fish?

    Thank you for clarifying this.




    7
    1. Yes. I’m guessing this would apply to even organic…perhaps even my homegrown in a pot with potting soil…cucumbers? Is it in the seeds and passed down each generation from the 1970’s & 80’s? Does anyone know if these banned toxins are coming from the soil or water or passed down in the seeds?




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      1. –Just looked at the whatsonmyplate site and it indicates that organic cucumbers are safe. Interesting. So do we conclude that conventional growers are spraying banned chemicals? Thanks for that link Susan.




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    1. https://nutritionfacts.org/video/arsenic-in-rice/ and https://nutritionfacts.org/2015/06/23/reducing-arsenic-in-chicken-and-rice/ may help in the meantime Doug. I remember reading that keeping portions small (1/4 to 1/2 cup or so ) no more than 2 x week was suggested. (might have been on world health org website)
      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/brown-rice-vs-black-rice/ and https://nutritionfacts.org/video/brown-black-purple-red-unlike-white-rice/ might interest you too. I look forward to Dr Greger’s deep dive into the rice topic for questions that remain – thanks Dr G !




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    2. Doug, sorry I don’t have a proper citation, but last time I checked into this, California organic brown rice had no detectable level of arsenic in it. Two local brands of such rice are Lundberg and Maasa Organics. Both can be ordered online; just add dot com after the names, with no space between Maasa and Organics. Good luck!




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      1. No detectable level of rice huh? That’s impressive considering that arsenic is usually found in all foods at some level, including all whole grains. They must actively remove it or something.




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        1. hi Doug, I responded to your question below, and included links from Lundberg showing the levels of arsenic in their rice. Its one of the companies that makes real effort to test and to disclose test results so that we can know what we’re eating. Another company was mentioned below too. There is arsenic in their rice, but according to their graph, its within limits. Also, Consumer Reports did a major report on arsenic in food, and in rice products in particular. It is linked in this article http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/magazine/2015/01/how-much-arsenic-is-in-your-rice/index.htm hope that helps




          1
      2. Also, you do have to be careful with Lundberg. If the package says, “Grown in California, it is indeed grown in Cali, but if it says “Grown in the USA, it’s been grown in the south due to drought requiring the leasing of other properties. This is in their website.




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  2. I too would like to know if the reason the children’s dioxin levels due to the chicken. What if they had been eating the
    same amount of ounces of fish or dairy? Would this have resulted in the same level, less, or more dioxin in blood?




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  3. I find the photo accompanying today’s video repellent. Even back when I ate chicken, I always found raw chicken to be disgusting.




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    1. I actually looked into this. Interestingly, if on the bag it says “Grown in California” then yes it is from Cali, but if it says “Grown in the U.S.A.” then it is grown in the South (with all the arsenic).




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    2. hi Harvey, those links you posted are for the upcoming video series yet to be shown on NF.. the links will work on the date the video is shown. In my reply to Doug above you will find other rice links from this site that do work.

      re arsenic in Lundberg rice.. not true. lundberg rice does contain arsenic but does test and publish the results annually http://www.lundberg.com/info/arsenic-in-food/arsenic-testing-results/ There is a question and answer page there also that may help. Brown rice has much more arsenic than white.




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    3. Arsenic in rice is primarily the result of rice being grown on land that was formerly used for cotton. Some decades back, large quantities of arsenic was applied to to farmland growing cotton to kill the boll weevils. Rice grown in the SE United States is often on land formerly used for cotton production. I don’t think much of the land in the Sacramento Valley in California was used for cotton production. Therefore, it is like that arsenic is not a problem in California grown rice.




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    4. This is another rice producer. http://www.lotusfoods.com/
      Compared with the results for the 1300 rices tested by FDA and with the results for rice tested by Consumer Reports in their independent investigation, Lotus Foods rices have among the lowest levels of total arsenic of any rice on the market, and in some cases the lowest levels.




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    1. Although some contaminants might be reduced by home-produced or “organic” labeled chicken, there is no form of poultry that has human health benefits that outweigh the risks and drawbacks/dangers also present when consuming such. All animal products are inflammatory. Most of them are contaminated, intentionally or not, by the feeding, drugging, and processing in production facilities.

      I eat a piece or two per year because humans are not perfect and I won’t pretend to be. Lucky to have survived my SAD days and will never go back.




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  4. Is it just me, or does anyone else think the FDA is as culpable as the chicken industry in this arsenic business? Does the FDA ever do anything to protect consumers, or do they merely represent the interests of the agriculture, chemical, and the food manufacturing industries?

    Somebody please tell me there’s someone out there who will protect us from all the greed and treachery of the food industry!

    Oh, yes… that would be Dr. Greger. =]




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  5. So, should we avoid potatoes, cucumbers, spinach, mushrooms, cantaloupe, lettuce, popcorn along with refined grains? I understand that even organic foods are contaminated with pesticides. Are they really that bad? Wouldn’t people be dropping like flies? Aren’t the good things in fruits and vegetables protective of the very slight poisons in our foods? Since it’s impossible to avoid contaminants, why would we want to drive ourselves crazy by worrying?




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    1. According to T. Colin Campbell, the benefits of eating the whole plant food so heavily trumps any possible risks from pesticide exposure as to make them a non issue.




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    2. Ruth T: Here’s a quote from one of the NutritionFacts posts which I think puts your concern into perspective:

      “A new study calculated that if half the U.S. population ate just one more serving of conventional fruits and vegetables, 20,000 cases of cancer could be prevented. At the same time the added pesticide consumption could cause up to 10 extra cancer cases. So by eating conventional produce we may get a tiny bump in cancer risk, but that’s more than compensated by the dramatic drop in risk that accompanies whole food plant consumption. Even if all we had to eat was the most contaminated produce the benefits would far outweigh any risks.”
      from: http://nutritionfacts.org/2013/06/25/apple-peels-turn-on-anticancer-genes/

      I translate this bit of info into: Eat organic when you can, but don’t stress about it when you can’t.




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        1. WFPB-Hal: That’s just awesome! Thanks for doing that. I’m touched. That must have taken you some effort.

          Everyone: (WFPBRunner and Paul and everyone else) Thanks for your nice comments today. I’m not back like before. Just popped in for a bit. :-) So nice to see you all here.




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          1. My pleasure, Thea. You’re one of the main moderators who helped attract me to the Nutritionfacts website, which in turn, convinced me to change my diet for the better, which in turn, has made me more healthy! Hope to see you visiting here more often. I still visit everyday, but don’t post much. Hal




            4
  6. Thanks for the fantastic work Dr Greger.
    This is one if those areas that brings to mind the big differences that often exist between different countries because of their different laws and policies.
    On this occasion it seems I am luckier than most in the US as an ex pat Brit now living in BC Canada.
    It seems as an Ex Brit I received little exposure to Arsenic in Chicken during my earlier life in Europe and I suspect ( though I’m not sure) Canada likely doesn’t allow Arsenic containing drugs to be given to Chickens either?.
    In any event I went Vegan a few years ago anyway so like one of the other comments left, I’m more worried about the cucumbers!
    I wonder though ? Is it time for a nutritionfacts.ca website and maybe a nutritionfacts.eu website too?




    2
    1. Hi Jerry Lewis. Since our planet is polluted with dioxin, this toxin contaminates all foods. However, plant foods contain MUCH LOWER levels of dioxins than animal foods, since dioxin accumulates up the food chain. Here’s an awesome graph (1/3 of the way down the page) “LEVELS OF DIOXIN IN US FOOD SUPPLY” — notice the vegan diet contains by far the least amount of dioxin. :) http://www.ejnet.org/dioxin/




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    2. After reading the overwhelming evidence presented by this site, and Drs McDougall, Colin Campbell, Esselstyn, Kim Williams , Furhman, Heather Shenkman, and so many others, I would find it incomprehensible to even consider consuming animal products. (though the ethical reasons are reasons enough for me. )




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    3. Jerry Lewis: There’s no bias here. You can’t escape dioxins completely, but you can figure out which foods have the most dioxins and avoid those. As show in in the following paper, animals foods have the highest concentrations by far. Plant foods have the lowest. This makes sense. You may want to do some research on the topic of bioaccumulation (as explained in this video) to understand what is going on.

      What are the major sources of dioxin and related compounds in the human diet?
      Dioxins are lipophilic compounds which accumulate in the fat of animals. The types of foods which tend to have the highest dioxin concentrations are dairy products, meat and poultry, eggs, fish, and animal fats (Eduljee and Gair, 1996). Green vegetables, fruits and grains are the types of foods with the lowest dioxin concentrations. Schecter et al. (1997) measured dioxins in pooled food samples that were collected in 1995 at supermarkets across the U.S. The pooled sample of fresh water fish had the highest level of dioxins (1.43 TEQ 1), followed by butter (1.07 TEQ), hotdog/bologna (0.54 TEQ), ocean fish (0.47 TEQ), cheese (0.40 TEQ), beef (0.38 TEQ), eggs (0.34 TEQ), ice cream (0.33 TEQ), chicken (0.32 TEQ), pork (0.32 TEQ), milk (0.12 TEQ), and vegetables, fruits, grains and legumes (0.07 TEQ). A person’ intake of dioxins through the diet therefore, depends on the relative intake of foods with high or low levels of contamination and the quantity consumed. For example, Patandin et al. (1999) investigated the dietary intake of a group of preschool children in The Netherlands and found that dairy products contributed about 50% of their intake of dioxins and related compounds, while meat/meat products and processed foods contributed about 20% and 25%, respectively (Patandin et al. 1999)

      .
      From: https://www.aphis.usda.gov/animal_health/emergingissues/downloads/dioxins.pdf

      Because there is such a significant difference between contaminants in animal foods vs plant foods, it is important to share this information with people so that they understand one of the dangers of consuming animal products. That’s not bias. That’s the science. Dr. Greger has given us several studies. I gave you more. The link you provided does not address this point.

      Also note that Dr. Greger did nothing to hide the plant foods that were shown in the study. And we are about to start a series of videos on rice. No bias here. Just the science. Ignore at your own risk.




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  7. What seems concerning is that fruits and vegetables were responsible for the greatest exposure to pesticides overall.

    From the study abstract:
    “Based on self-reported dietary data, the greatest exposure to pesticides from foods included in this analysis were tomatoes, peaches, apples, peppers, grapes, lettuce, broccoli, strawberries, spinach, dairy, pears, green beans, and celery.” According to the study, fruits and vegetables were the main source of dietary exposure to lead, chlorpyrifos, permethrin, endosulfan, and dieldrin.

    While the participants consumed higher amounts of fruits and vegetables than the national average, they were not considered to be primarily plant-based eaters. One has to wonder how high the exposure to these chemicals would be among people whose diets are mainly or totally plant-based.




    4
  8. Thanks for a great video! I was disappointed to see mushrooms high on the list of arsenic culprits in adults! I have mushrooms every day. Should I be worried? Would organic varieties have less?

    Also, what about Brussels Sprouts? Prevention Magazine online says they’re a big source, yet they’re one of the super foods!
    How concerned should we be about mushrooms and Brussels Sprouts?
    Thanks!




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    1. Mushrooms suck up whatever they are grown in, that’s why they use mushrooms to detoxify soil. It’s important to eat organic mushrooms.




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  9. Not looking to justify eating meat as I’ve pretty much (not completely) moved past that. But I would like to see these studies break meats, like chicken for instance, into different segments, i.e., fed animals vs. free range animals.

    Just saying “chicken” contains arsenic without breaking it down by the way the chicken was raised (or even the breed and gender) may result in a bias against all chicken meat while some (free range, Rhode Island Red, pullet etc.) may have little or none of the offending chemical.

    Science, like any news article, has a varying amount of bias it seems.




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    1. Just to follow up… this may be an argument for taking supplements to get the nutrients our bodies need. Many if not most supplements are tested at some point for adulterating chemicals, metals, etc.




      1
    2. Exactly. Clean sources of meat vs. contaminated meat is the same as clean vegetables and contaminated vegetables. The vegan crowd likes to think that meat is the only source of contamination.




      0
      1. Heh, Jerry… while I appreciate agreement with my position, I for one do not see Veganism as the opposition. Rather, I think we are all striving for the same goal and that is our personal good health.

        I guess I understand your comments toward some vegans who are militant like in their opposition to meat, like the group that sort of attacked a family in Florida who were fishing for their supper.

        The vegan group intruded on their outing and grabbed a talapia fish they had caught and threw it back into the water saying “fish have feelings too!”

        The victims stated that the Talapia is a rough fish that is not native and is crowding out the bass. Many restaurants serve the things and I personally would prefer to eat stewed leather than Talapia.

        My personal thinking is that a bitten apple is conscious of pain to the same extent a fish is to a hook, but the fish just reacts differently from the apple.

        I think the people who are on this forum are a bit more sensible than the vegan group in Florida and I respect and understand their position even though I am not as dedicated to veganism as some are.

        Just sayin’ it doesn’t have to just be a black and white either or… more like shades of grey with room for debate.




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  10. Arsenic are loaded in cruciferous vegetables. Should we eat them?

    We should always eat organic chicken and other organic meat and vegetables.

    1. Brussels sprouts Despite the fact that these vegetables are among the healthiest you can eat, Dr. Cottingham’s research, along with others studies, note that inorganic arsenic that exists in soil is highly attracted to sulfur compounds in brussels sprouts, along with other cruciferous vegetables, including kale, broccoli, and cauliflower. Arsenic levels in regular sprout eaters were 10.4% higher than in people who never ate them or ate them less than once a month.




    3
    1. You write that “We should always eat organic chicken and other organic meat ……”

      They are probably less unhealthy than the non organic meat alternatives but where is the evidence that they are actually “healthy”? In Uruguay, for example, where all the cattle are pasture/grass fed and the beef is therefore effectively organic, cancer rates rise with increased meat/beef consumption.
      http://journal.waocp.org/?sid=Entrez:PubMed&id=pmid:19640186&key=2009.10.3.429

      This is not unexpected – organic meats also contain cholesterol, saturated fat, animal protein, arachidonic acid, Neu5Cg sialic acid etc (in red meat) which are problematic for human health. Until there is some credible evidence that that consuming organic meat is healthy, or at least harmless, its advocacy appears more like wishful thinking than a soundly-reasoned argument.




      1
    2. I’d also like to know more about this and what it means for us. Would organic Kayle, Broccoli, Cabbage etc. be less contaminated? What about the form of arsenic in it? If it’s the organic variety, that’s less of a problem.




      0
      1. Hi, Alex. Arsenic has been widely covered here on NF. I would recommend these videos for more information:
        https://nutritionfacts.org/?fwp_search=arsenic&fwp_content_type=video
        Generally speaking, plants have lower concentrations of contaminants such as arsenic than animals, because it accumulates in animals as they take it in over and over again from water, feed, and pharmaceuticals. An exception to this is rice, which is usually grown in rice, and takes in a lot of it. The exact amount depends on the soil and water in a particular area where crops are grown. I hope that helps!




        0
  11. Just wanted to say THANK YOU to whoever made this particular video. The method of text highlighting (darkening the rest, highlighting the appropriate portion) is WAY BETTER than the silly green text videos that explode outward and push everything on the screen around. I wish that person would stop making videos and adopt this video’s method.




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  12. Can you please do an article on osteoporosis?
    It if there is one how can one find it?
    I’ve been pro-active with my health & don’t understand how I could have osteoporosis.
    Looking for natural recommendations. What should one eat? How does one know what to take foe supplements




    2
    1. hi Barbara, to search on this site just click on the menu and type “osteoporosis” in the search box. To get you started with videos, here is a couple of links https://nutritionfacts.org/video/phytates-for-the-prevention-of-osteoporosis/ and https://nutritionfacts.org/video/alkaline-diets-animal-protein-and-calcium-loss/ Under Doctor’s Notes beneath each video you will find more links that might be of interest.
      Just as a side note, since adopting a whole food plant based diet with zero animal products or calcium supplements , my calcium levels have been ‘perfect’ in the words of the doctor for the first time in my life. Thank you NutritionFacts!




      1
      1. Thank you sooooo much Susan.
        I went plant based about 2 years ago & never felt better. Then this crazy osteoporosis diagnosis & im starting to question what happened/ where did I go wrong.
        Can you recommend a site/ book on information regarding nutritional balance.
        Want to ensure I’m getting the proper amounts at the same time get others to quit judging me for wanting to stick to plant based dispite osteoporosis.
        I so appreciate your feedback




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        1. Barbara: If I may recommend a book, check out: Building Bone Vitality. It’s awesome. It will help you feel a lot better about your diet choices. I don’t think people get osteoporosis in a year, two years, three years, etc. My understanding is that it is a condition condition one works up to over decades. I’m not a doctor, but I’d guess that your diet switch two years ago did not cause or progress your problem. The book is a quick read and like Dr. Greger’s stuff, highly referenced.

          Idea: You might look into what kinds of weight bearing exercises you can safely do in order to build back up your bones.

          If interested, the book I’m talking about is: https://www.amazon.com/Building-Bone-Vitality-Revolutionary-Osteoporosis-Without/dp/0071600191/ref=sr_1_1_twi_pap_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1500416381&sr=1-1&keywords=building+bone+vitality




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          1. Very true but I was looking for a nutritional plan. I’ve ordered a couple books so I hope to get some answers so that I’m providing my bones & overall health with proper nutrition.




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        2. Barbara – I had a bone scan before and after 6 years on a text-book plant based diet high in plant protein and veges and fruit and moderate in calcium and I lost about 35% of my spinal bone density – prior to commencing the plant based diet I had high bone density and I now have pronounced osteoporosis in the spine. The rate of loss has been absolutely staggering. I am 56 so menopause contributes for sure, but my husband also lost masses of bone in his spine at the same time, clearly implicating the diet. We both do lots of exercise. I was a great believer in the WFPB and I grieve giving it up, but I think that for exactly the same reasons it helps prevent cancer, it is bad for bone. I suspect this is true of soy as well – that it is primarily an estrogen antagonist and so helps prevent cancer but is not helpful for bone (there is one observational study among breast cancer survivors showing exactly that – decreased cancer risk + decreased bone density among the higher soy consumers). Good luck – be sure to get regular Dexa scans so you can track what is happening.




          0
  13. Does the information contained in your videos here and your book ‘How Not to Die’ apply to the UK? We have more regulations surrounding food production here – are we in the same danger?
    By the way, my husband and I have moved to a whole foods plant based diet. However, your recommendations for daily food intake appear to be a bit over the top. For example, 3 servings of beans per day! I would have to eat them for breakfast, lunch and dinner to fit them in and would not enjoy living like that. We do eat them but not that often – is that OK?
    We have lots of questions but one big one is regarding coffee. People mostly drink instant coffee here. Recently we switched to decaffeinated instant coffee. Is there anything wrong with decaffeinated coffee? Should we switch back to caffeine and/or use coffee beans instead of instant?




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  14. Arsenic is not the only risk you accept when eating poultry and fish, no use trying to weigh up just the arsenic to make a decision as to which is better for you. Zero arsenic is better for you. Other risks include: carcinogens, viruses, cholesterol/cardiovascular disease, weight gain, diabetes, parasites, bad bacteria, other heavy metals, kidney stones, atrial fibrillation, low IQ, cellular aging, low sperm counts, low testosterone, depression, anxiety, stress, early puberty etc. Zero of all of these is better for you. Try and eat something else.




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