Benefits of Ginger for Obesity and Fatty Liver Disease

Benefits of Ginger for Obesity and Fatty Liver Disease
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Ground ginger powder is put to the test for weight loss and NAFLD, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Ginger has been used in India and China to treat illnesses for thousands of years. But, they also used mercury, so that doesn’t really tell you much. That’s what we have science for. But, when you see titles like this in the medical literature on the “beneficial effects of ginger…on obesity,” for example, you may not be aware they’re talking about the beneficial effects of ginger on fat rats. Wait; why don’t they just do human clinical studies? The “lack of clinical studies may be attributed to [for example] ethical issues [and] limited commercial support.” Limited commercial support I can see. Ginger is dirt cheap; who’s going to pay for the study. But ethical issues? We’re just talking about feeding people some ginger!

Studies like this are relatively cheap and easy to do: cross-sectional studies where you take a snapshot in time of ginger consumption and body weight. And, you do see that people who are obese tend to eat significantly less ginger. And so, they suggest this “demonstrate[s] that the use of ginger could have relevance for weight management.” But maybe ginger consumption is just a marker of more traditional, less Westernized, junk food diets. You don’t know…until you put it to the test.

A randomized, controlled trial to assess “the effects of a hot ginger beverage”—by which they just meant two grams of ginger powder in a cup of hot water. So, about one teaspoon of ground ginger stirred into a teacup of hot water. That’s about five cents worth of ginger. And…after the ginger, the participants reported feeling significantly less hungry. And, in response to the question, “How much do you think you could eat?” described “lower prospective food intake.”

Now the control was just “hot water alone,” so the participants knew when they were getting the ginger. So, there could be a placebo effect. They considered just stuffing the ginger into capsules to do a double-blinded study, but they think part of the effect of ginger may actually be through taste receptors on the tongue. So, they didn’t want to interfere with that.

Not all the effects were just subjective, though. Four hours after drinking, the metabolic rate in the ginger group was elevated compared to control—though in a previous study, when fresh ginger was added to a meal, there was no bump in metabolic rate. The researchers suggest this may be “due to the different method of ginger administration”—giving fresh instead of dried. And, there are dehydration products that form when you dry ginger that may have unique properties.

Now although satiety and fullness were greater with ginger compared to control, the researchers didn’t then follow the participants out to see if they like actually ate less for lunch. The problem is, there’s never been a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of that much ginger and weight loss…until now.

Twelve weeks of that same teaspoon of ginger powder a day, but this time hidden in capsules. And, consumption of ginger for 12 weeks significantly reduced body mass index. Check it out. No change in the placebo group, but a drop in the ginger group—though body fat estimates didn’t really change, which is kind of the whole point.

What about using ginger to pull fat out of specific organs, like the liver? Evidently, “[t]reatment with ginger ameliorates fructose-induced fatty liver…in rats.” You know what else would have worked? Not feeding them so much sugar in the first place. But there’s never been a human…you know where this is going…until now. “Ginger supplementation in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled…study”—a teaspoon of ginger a day or placebo for 12 weeks.

They were all told “to limit their dietary cholesterol intake”—I’ve got a video on why that’s important—and get more fiber and exercise. So, even the placebo group should improve.  But did the ginger group do any better? Yes, “daily consumption” of just that teaspoon of ground ginger a day “resulted in a significant decrease in inflammatory marker levels,” and improvements in liver function tests, and a drop in liver fat. All for five cents worth of ginger powder a day.

And, what are the side effects? A few gingery burps? I searched for downsides, and didn’t find any other than, of course, “ginger paralysis.” What?! “In 1930, thousands of Americans were poisoned” by a ginger extract. First of all, who drinks ginger extract? Oh, 1930, it was Prohibition, so they bought ginger extract as a legal way to get their hands on alcohol. “Little did he realize that the bootleggers had [been taking] advantage of the demand,” swapped in a cheaper ginger substitute, a varnish compound, in order to make greater profits. The moral of the story being…don’t drink varnish.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Adobe via Adobe Stock images. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Ginger has been used in India and China to treat illnesses for thousands of years. But, they also used mercury, so that doesn’t really tell you much. That’s what we have science for. But, when you see titles like this in the medical literature on the “beneficial effects of ginger…on obesity,” for example, you may not be aware they’re talking about the beneficial effects of ginger on fat rats. Wait; why don’t they just do human clinical studies? The “lack of clinical studies may be attributed to [for example] ethical issues [and] limited commercial support.” Limited commercial support I can see. Ginger is dirt cheap; who’s going to pay for the study. But ethical issues? We’re just talking about feeding people some ginger!

Studies like this are relatively cheap and easy to do: cross-sectional studies where you take a snapshot in time of ginger consumption and body weight. And, you do see that people who are obese tend to eat significantly less ginger. And so, they suggest this “demonstrate[s] that the use of ginger could have relevance for weight management.” But maybe ginger consumption is just a marker of more traditional, less Westernized, junk food diets. You don’t know…until you put it to the test.

A randomized, controlled trial to assess “the effects of a hot ginger beverage”—by which they just meant two grams of ginger powder in a cup of hot water. So, about one teaspoon of ground ginger stirred into a teacup of hot water. That’s about five cents worth of ginger. And…after the ginger, the participants reported feeling significantly less hungry. And, in response to the question, “How much do you think you could eat?” described “lower prospective food intake.”

Now the control was just “hot water alone,” so the participants knew when they were getting the ginger. So, there could be a placebo effect. They considered just stuffing the ginger into capsules to do a double-blinded study, but they think part of the effect of ginger may actually be through taste receptors on the tongue. So, they didn’t want to interfere with that.

Not all the effects were just subjective, though. Four hours after drinking, the metabolic rate in the ginger group was elevated compared to control—though in a previous study, when fresh ginger was added to a meal, there was no bump in metabolic rate. The researchers suggest this may be “due to the different method of ginger administration”—giving fresh instead of dried. And, there are dehydration products that form when you dry ginger that may have unique properties.

Now although satiety and fullness were greater with ginger compared to control, the researchers didn’t then follow the participants out to see if they like actually ate less for lunch. The problem is, there’s never been a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of that much ginger and weight loss…until now.

Twelve weeks of that same teaspoon of ginger powder a day, but this time hidden in capsules. And, consumption of ginger for 12 weeks significantly reduced body mass index. Check it out. No change in the placebo group, but a drop in the ginger group—though body fat estimates didn’t really change, which is kind of the whole point.

What about using ginger to pull fat out of specific organs, like the liver? Evidently, “[t]reatment with ginger ameliorates fructose-induced fatty liver…in rats.” You know what else would have worked? Not feeding them so much sugar in the first place. But there’s never been a human…you know where this is going…until now. “Ginger supplementation in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled…study”—a teaspoon of ginger a day or placebo for 12 weeks.

They were all told “to limit their dietary cholesterol intake”—I’ve got a video on why that’s important—and get more fiber and exercise. So, even the placebo group should improve.  But did the ginger group do any better? Yes, “daily consumption” of just that teaspoon of ground ginger a day “resulted in a significant decrease in inflammatory marker levels,” and improvements in liver function tests, and a drop in liver fat. All for five cents worth of ginger powder a day.

And, what are the side effects? A few gingery burps? I searched for downsides, and didn’t find any other than, of course, “ginger paralysis.” What?! “In 1930, thousands of Americans were poisoned” by a ginger extract. First of all, who drinks ginger extract? Oh, 1930, it was Prohibition, so they bought ginger extract as a legal way to get their hands on alcohol. “Little did he realize that the bootleggers had [been taking] advantage of the demand,” swapped in a cheaper ginger substitute, a varnish compound, in order to make greater profits. The moral of the story being…don’t drink varnish.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Adobe via Adobe Stock images. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video.

82 responses to “Benefits of Ginger for Obesity and Fatty Liver Disease

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  1. What has happened to the play on YouTube option that used to be located in the bottom right hand corner of the screen?

    NF videos play fine on YouTube unlikre playing directly from NutritionFacts where they haven’t fitted the screen on any of my computers since the site was ‘upgraded’ a couple of years ago

  2. For some time now I’ve been fixing a warm “turmeric milk” drink in our household that includes a few small slices of raw ginger (the whole drink is run through the Vitamix to liquify it). My assumption is that raw is better than powdered. I’m wondering if that’s true.

    1. Chuck R., in paragraph 5 of the written transcripts of today’s video Dr Greger explains that dried powdered ginger worked, but not fresh – at least in this application. At this moment I am trying powdered ginger to treat migraine (after seeing the video moments ago -thanks Dr Greger!) and I know Fresh does not work in that case. My husband and I enjoy fresh ginger daily in stir frys or curry, but have not noticed therapeutic effects.

      1. Barb, I drink ginger coffee. I first tasted it as iced coffee this past June, and liked it so much that I made it at home. I now drink hot ginger coffee: I add hot water to powdered ginger (1/2 t), then use it to dilute a coffee concentrate I make in my AeroPress. I’m guessing that powdered ginger could be added directly to brewed coffee. I like using the powdered ginger better than adding ginger tea made with a tea bag to my coffee concentrate, which is how I started.

        Also, because I’m lazy, I almost always use powdered ginger instead of fresh in recipes that call for ginger. Easier to store, easier to use.

        1. Great ideas Dr J! I will try it. I did try fresh ginger ‘tea’ but I suffered searing pain … my already inflammed stomach at the time was made much worse. Now that I have healed up some, the powdered ginger causes no issues. Btw, my migraine feels as though it has been derailed, and I was very skeptical in trying it, though it could still be placebo effect . We’ll see over the course of the next few weeks. I agree, powdered ginger is easy to use and store. Here is a ginger video with an explanation of why powdered ginger works vs using fresh.

          https://nutritionfacts.org/video/Ground-Ginger-to-Reduce-Muscle-Pain/

          1. Barb, I have had the same reaction to fresh ginger! I could not believe that people ate it to “settle” their stomachs. Mine would feel as though it was being ripped apart. Surprisingly, I can “stomach” the ginger coffee. Though I have only used 1/2 teaspoon of ground ginger per 16 ounce mug of coffee. One side effect: I can now eat crystallized ginger (without the pain), though I do so sparingly — it’s really candy. Tasty candy, though.

  3. Barb:
    Both ginger and turmeric can hurt the stomach and even cause acid reflux when taken to empty stomach. I’d try ginger tea after a full meal.

    1. Thanks George and Dr J, glad to know Im not the only one. I also get that reaction from organic aloe vera juice .. it must be the citric acid they use as a preservative. Pain worse than an ulcer.. I’d never give it to a child.

  4. I have a comment about the chart at 5:35. BMI dropped for the ginger group, as opposed to the placebo group, but ginger also had a lower initial value, almost a point lower. This is not unreasonable; I suppose the ginger group had an average BMI about a point below the placebo group at the start of the study. But I wish the two plots had a common starting point. It makes me wonder if the ginger group were more physically “fit” than the placebo group in the first place.

    I get it that the ginger group dropped BMI and Fat Mass over the duration, and that’s ultimately what they were investigating.

    If someone has a thought about this, I’d like to hear. Maybe I have too much fat in my brain and am making something out of nothing… =]

    1. Dr. Cobalt,

      I agree that I wish that it had started at the same point.

      Dietary and exercise habits and people-pleasing habits could confound the study. For instance, the thinner person might be more conscious of what people think of them and might be more likely to have a higher level of eating better for the study effect. (Where the fatter person might not be as vigilant in their diet because they are “used to” being judged and already didn’t have the self-control in eating.)

      My two cents.

      However, when you are discussing a change in body composition, I am not sure that being more physically fit would have an advantage.

      It might work that way for fat, but thinking of things like the Biggest Loser, generally for weight loss, having someone with more weight and fat to lose would seem to be more likely to have bigger results.

      Also, neither group had an actual fat mass loss. They both had small increases in that category. There was slightly more of an increase in fat mass in the placebo group.

      1. I mentally brought it outside of food and thought of an analogy.

        I had a pastor who was so organized that his suits and socks were color coordinated within his closet and he had a place for everything and a schedule for everything and would not buy extra of anything so that his pantry and refrigerator would always be in order. Within that church, there were a handful of hoarders.

        If someone did a “Does eating ginger powder increase organization ability” study with them, the pastor would always win because he would get even better and the hoarders have shut down even when the fire marshalls have come and threatened them, so I already know that there would be no “study effect” on them. If someone helped the hoarders they would have the biggest change because they had the most room for change, but if they were just given ginger, they might have a change that increased their brain power, but they still might not know what to actually do to change. (Some of us have had our brain shut down where we started having bags of groceries every day out of disorderly thinking, so that is an example that doesn’t sound odd to me.)

  5. I eyeballed one of those fresh, gnarled ginger entities at Stop&Shop today, but decided no, I’d stick with the powdered ginger (and cinnamon) that I shake on my trusty morning gruel. The fresh seems so….high maintenance, somehow.

    1. Varnish is not drinkable. Varnish used in nail polish often contains beeswax derivitive so it is generally not vegan. Shellac is hardly ever, as it is often in part made from a bug, but put on many things like apples to enhance shelf life.

      Vegan is the best that can be done….. not strictly not harming animals. All grains fruits and such, require killing in harvest and likely protection from harm of bugs which causes their death at times, even the organic stuff.
      Nail polish is really some pretty toxic stuff. Some places require their workers who use that every day to wear mask,s though I doubt if they protect from fumes. Having those who put on nail polish wear self contained breathing apparatus would probably be a step to far, and discourage business.

      1. Industry is reluctant to accept things that would harm a business. I worked at time in nursing homes back in the day. If I came upon a elderly male who was suffering dementia the first question I always asked them was…were you a welder. Back then it was not so widespread dementia. The answer I got about half of the time was yes. A component of the welding rods which are burnt and produce fumes, are thought to produce that effect directly. Though the industry is still fighting lawsuit subsequent to that to this day, to my knowledge.

        It is a clearly present effect and welders even now often just wear hoods not SCBA’s.

          1. To whit a study on organic produce and cancer risk as opposed to non in the news today….. https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/2707948
            The study however is not bulletproof and has some structural difficulties. It does corroborate some prior study. This is where the news stories are coming from so you can use your own judgement
            Shellac is not a pesticide but personally if avoidable I prefer not to.

  6. Ginger extract? I wonder if ginger essential oil would be considered an extract? I have seen recipes using it. It is not varnished though. And the better food grade ones are closer to raw. So, it may not have the same benefits. More and more health professionals are using essential oils internally for treatments now. This fresh vs powdered benefits puts a whole new twist on my thinking.

  7. As an MD with a degree in biochemistry, I have always worked to determine the nutrients in food. I was for a few years a consultant in allergology, so, it was really the way to practice. Ginger powder and fresh ginger have a different biochemistry. Turmeric and Cardamom are also from the ginger family and the 3 are anti-inflammatory “nutraceuticals”. Inflammation is part of changes in metabolism that increases the risk of obesity, this video may be relating to this fact.

    1. Ashok,

      That sounds good, but I wonder if the added sugar would undo some of the fatty liver benefits.

      I am trying to stay away from sweeteners because of the microbiome effects.

      I wonder if honey might work.

      1. Laughing, because I have to go rewatch that “sweeteners and the microbiome” video or read the blog again, whichever it was. Was honey covered in it? Boy, I have a mental block. I just remember that 2 weeks off the sweeteners improved the microbiome. Some of us had a major sweet tooth. Or sweet teeth might be a way to pluralize it enough to get the concept across. Honey, instead of sugar might not hurt my gums. But the fact I am looking for sweet things means I need to get some bananas and put them in the freezer.

          1. Thanks Tom,

            Yes I went back to the Molasses and Date sugar video and those are the two “health promoting” sweeteners, but recently, during the primitive diet video, I looked up honey and gums and honey improves gums a little and may fix the oral / gut microbiome. Not sure about that but it wasn’t listed in the sweeteners which hurt the gut microbiome blog and the Greenmed guy says that it has a lot of range of good bacteria. (But less nutrition than Date sugar and Molasses. Yes, we had a comment that honey is a bio-accumulator of environmental toxins, so we have to find out which country has the healthiest environment.

            I wonder if Maple might have a wide range of good bacteria, too? Comes from trees, the trees may grow in some places where there was less RoundUp? That is just my internal question mark, but they might have tested it.

          2. And MY personal choice is either raw (preferably still in the honeycomb) honey or blackstrap molasses.

            “Honey has been used in Ayurvedic medicine in India for at least 4,000 years and is considered to affect all three of the body’s primitive material imbalances positively. It is also said to be useful in improving eyesight, weight loss, curing impotence and premature ejaculation, urinary tract disorders, bronchial asthma, diarrhea and nausea.”

            https://www.care2.com/greenliving/10-health-benefits-of-honey.html

            1. Mercury.lead and arsenic have also been used in Ayurvedic medicine for thousand of years. They are said to be effective remedies for various ailments.

              Just because sometnig has been used in Ayurvedi medicine for thousands of years, it isn’t necessarily either health promoting or even safe.

              We are better off sticking wth what the science tells us rather than what thousands-of-years-old bs tells us. I mean that literally. In the Rasa Shastra arm of Ayurvedic medicine, these metals are ‘purified’ ny being baked in cow dung so they can be used mediconally.

              1. The quote was merely to show that honey has been around, like, forever! The bees having been fulfilling their purpose for a very long time. We need them, bless their buzzing little hearts!

                http://www.onegreenplanet.org/animalsandnature/why-bees-are-important-to-our-planet/

                We can find things “harmful” in just about anything, of that’s our intention. I say, put the White Light Protection around a little 1/2 teaspoon of honey and it won’t killya. I’m still kicking, with no health problems whatsoever!

                (People worry too much…especially vegan types. :-)

                    1. Possibly. I’ll have to look for a sage stick to swirl around me. Need to find a match to light it with, first.

  8. “Don’t drink varnish!” Right up there with, “You’ll shoot your eye out, kid.”

    It’s cutting edge advice like this that keeps me coming back to NF.org! ;^) JK!

    Actually, though I’ve been whole-food, plant-based (WF-PB) vegan for coming on five years now, I’ve seriously plateaued and have concerns that I might have a non-alcoholic fatty-liver as well. I’ll definitely give this a go. Thanks Doc-G for all the great work you deliver to the world!

  9. Recently, I saw on an alt. news program (maybe RT) whereby prohibition was mentioned; and the fact that it was uninforcible; so some authority (maybe the gov.) poisoned alcoholic beverages so that drinkers would get sick—and thereby stop drinking? Sick and dead would do it.

    1. Tend to think not. The reason they started the FDA back in the day was things occurring like this. Most conspicuously they had a cough syrup with antifreeze component in it killing bunches, the inventor killed himself but really there was not legal recourse back then..mistakes were mistakes. OSHA fire regulations all of these were created by governments to confront tragedies, not caused by government.

      On thing connected to alcohol was another drink trying to get around prohibitions in the south…caused what they called the jake shakes I think it was. Caused permenant neurological damage.
      RT is not a conspiracy site generally perhaps, you are confusing with Alex Jones or some others. Some of the most honest reporting is coming out of there if you are left leaning. Redacted tonight being most conspicuous in that.

      1. The first overt intentional poisioning that I know of was the Tylenol scare around 1970 in Chicago.
        Caused government to require all the packageing safety we now take for granted. Before that some unintentional things but almost always just a murder attempt not a widespread thing. Like school shootings at one time they did not exist. By my take it speaks of a collective degrading of societal norms but that is a personal view.

  10. I’m kind of disappointed in hearing about ginger powder. I use both during many days. I put ginger powder with blueberries and fresh pear on my morning oatmeal (pear “muesli,”) and I LOVE fresh ginger in soups at this time of year. I recently had Thai curry at an authentic restaurant, and saw within the curry 2-1/2 inch long thin things that looked like potato with the skin on, only to be delighted to find that they were fresh ginger “spikes” in my curry!!!

    1. What are you disappointed with? I am confused.

      I re-read the transcript again and didn’t see any anti-ginger-powder sentiment.

      Stay away from the extract though.

        1. Dr. Greger,

          The information, which you give goes back and forth in ways where it can be like trying to follow a magic trick. Fresh versus ground ginger versus extract in water or in capsules or with varnish would be the types of things where people can have trouble holding onto things. You have done some, like the Jet Lag one where I have needed to rewind more than once and I still may have gotten the information wrong because you said if you do it wrong you can make your sleep cycle worse and I was falling asleep at 4 am and now I am falling asleep at 7 am and I may have mixed up something.

          I used to watch Brain Games and they had several episodes on how many things people can focus on at the same time and on drawing attention away from one thing and toward another thing. They had a few episodes where they had people watch a stage performance and one people missed a penguin walking across the stage and one they missed a chicken and they might have missed a double dutch team and a chicken in that one or something like that. It was about 5 ridiculously big things which they put on stage when there was too much going on and 80% of people didn’t catch any of it.

          I am not saying that you need to leave things out, but if you are going to throw an extract curveball at the end, point people back to the powder.

          1. I am not saying that it happens often.

            I think for some things, like cell phones and pot, people are coming to hear “Is it safe?” and with things like ginger, it is “Does it work?” and we are following with that question in the back of our focus and we follow and the real answer to the first one was “it did this, but not that” and we are still trying to answer the question we brought in. With conditions like Cancer or Diabetes we have an internal “Does it work” and if not we are going to be disappointed and want an arrow pointing toward some other answer.

            In this one, the cholesterol photo pulled me out of the sentence that both sides were told to lower their cholesterol and yet that was an entertaining part of the video and I know those are the choices, which have to be made, but if I hadn’t read the transcript after, I wouldn’t have been able to evaluate whether lowering the cholesterol would affect the control group – and the information is coming so fast in the video that it is hard to evaluate the studies within the videos unless we go to the physical studies and look at them, so that is when the people who get frustrated when you use a less than gold standard study come in and pester you. I don’t mind that you use other studies at all and I don’t mind that you use older studies, but that is a pet peeve, so mentioning that there are no newer studies might be a good idea.

            No complaints. You are still doing an excellent job. Those are just things to have in the back of your mind.

              1. Knowing that you are too busy to watch those:

                My 8-year-old pal still can’t tell the difference between real and fake and imaginary and doesn’t know when videos are entertainment. She gets fooled by the family skit videos even when they use tiny plastic hands and fake beards and fake accents. Santa doesn’t even have to have a beard. Just a red coat.

                The tweens might be harder to fool, but they seriously can’t figure out whether something is dangerous or safe at all, at all, at all.

                Older people can’t follow too much information, but they are better at figuring things out.

                You have young people in your creative process, but you need to run it by at least one or two older people and find a balance.

                You also have older people who are experienced such as doctors who are a million miles ahead in understanding and you have older people with zero experience and zero understanding and you have young people who will be able to take in lots more information because they are studying science in school right now.

                1. Mic The Vegan did a video on carbs and he showed 2 tweens who followed some old guy’s advice and did a sugar diet and they gained 50 pounds. Tweens need special instructions.

              2. The Battle of the Sexes had one, which explained everything.

                Men are like Microwaves and Women like Crockpots might have been demonstrated. The men were just about finishing the competition while the women were finishing reading the instructions.

      1. Oh, Deb–I was reading through the comments about powder vs. fresh…. I *love *fresh ginger and use it just about every day in soups or stir-fries. If it boils down to the powder working better, which it appears that the comments were leaning from folks reading the literature, I’m disappointed.

  11. I make a decoction by boiling water, fresh ginger, turmeric, cinnamon sticks and some cayenne. Keep the concentrate in the fridge and add to green tea. If the ginger is cooked in this way, is it effective?

  12. Study or not powdered ginger will never taste as good or have the same bite as fresh. In fact juicing ginger and drying the heavy white sediment it throws off also results in a much stronger powder than any I have found sold anywhere.

    1. The book is fraught with misconceptions and misreads on study statement and data. From RD vegan site…
      “Keith makes a big point about the fact that humans now eat foods—grains—that our Paleolithic ancestors rarely ate. But she never discusses the fact that dairy, a food she heartily endorses, falls into the same category. In fact, while grains could be gathered, ground and consumed by our ancestors, dairy is 100% dependent on agriculture. The fact that normal human development—throughout most of the world, at least—results in a decreased ability to digest dairy foods, should provide a major clue that humans did not evolve to consume them. None of this gets even a mention in the book.”

      The vast majority of peoples are lactose intolerent and anthropological study attests it being a recent addition to diet within 10.000 years or so and then only in specific groups of peoples. Natives in america for instance are all lactose intolerant and cattle were not a native specie until Europeans introduced them.
      Our teeth our musculature nothing suggest humans in our evolutionary history were meat eaters in any primary fashion. If we were we would have digestive systems which reflect that as well as teeth and musculature which would allow us to kill and eat animals. Chimps for instance are much stronger than us and they do indeed cannibalize other specie close to theirs but not them, in a natural environment. Up to 10% of their total food intake is meat by recent study.
      But only in a month or so when other foods are scarce.Take a look perhaps at their teeth and then ours and ask who is most suited to hunt and kill animals….

      Our muscles are endurance sort. Which provides great advantage in ability to forage at great distance. The idea we would travel for miles to hunt in ancient times and simply wear out our prey seems unrealistic. Put any carnivore in our place a cage, or such of our approximate size and see who comes out alive it will not be human. Prey hunted in such a fashion, a long walk perhaps, would not magically loose their tusks horns teeth or claws when we eventually did run them down….they would likely kill us as result and then eat us…little recommends us to be carnivores. With tools came some or that but also agriculture which again reemphasized grains.

      We evolved as groups but certainly if it advantaged us,and we were primarily carnivore some of us eventually would have adapted to form large teeth and muscles to kill animals…but we did not.
      Little tiny teeth like we have are good in the main for veggies and such not animals. Try to eat a dead animal with just your teeth….impossible unless very small.
      Likely we did eat very small animals. Larger came only with tools fire and such which was far along our evolutionary path. What influence the last 100,000 years compared to the prior 1.2 million or so…a bit but not much.

      Another failed vegan wrote it. If she was so smart on diet why then the failure? Many do it perfectly healthy for years or their whole life if done correctly.

      1. Locally here at least, I am quite familiar with anthropological study of local natives before identification with tribes currently. Their prehistory. It is clear and always a known they consumed much in the way of grains as tools in these place attest to that. Hunter gatherers always consumed large amounts of grains. Navajo were probably the most recent addition to the Americas and they were hunter gatherer prior to 400 or so years ago. We know they consumed grains as they utilize tools to prepare it, some until very recently, still in use. Places of habitation were different winter and summer. Depending on food source.

        1. Ron

          I am watching a program on Fentanyl. They said that 80% of the drugs are laced with it now and that 2 grains of salt worth kills people. That surprised me.

          The man who watches the deaths in the country said that the deaths spread in real time like a communicable disease.

          They think that the 12 step programs fail 80% that they are unworkable but that Methadone and Suboxone works up to 90%.

          The drugs change the DNA in the brain switching some parts off and turning others on and change glutamate.

          It isn’t the first time I heard this information but the medical model doesn’t just go straight to a better model.

          1. I was reading and one rehab site said:

            “Detoxifications and drug free modalities, although appealing to an understandable desire for recovery without medications, produces only 5-10% success rate. Methadone maintenance is associated with success rates ranging from 60 – 90%.”

            People are dying at such a high level now and so many drugs are tainted and they aren’t just getting them on the stuff that can work more effectively. A family talked about spending hundreds of thousands of dollars to get their son off of drugs and he got his ambition back and went to college, but three days later he was dead because of the laced drugs. We don’t care about this part of our population, but what I am hearing is that they got their brain back and personality back and ambition back, but needed something to help them get rid of the cravings. Where are the doctors demanding a new way of doing that process? Or do the rehabs make so much money that the processes won’t be changed?

            1. My friend who died this past year used to spend his days tracking homeless people. He would drive around finding out where they live and what their needs were.

              The addicts can’t find rehabs or shelters to live in full-time. They could have a place where they go and get Methadone every single day and a cup of golden milk and anti-inflammatory food. It breaks my heart that 80% of the drugs are laced with something, which will kill people and it could take us decades to figure it out when we already have something so much more effective than what we are doing.

              1. There needs to be a concept of shelters as places of rehab. These poor people cannot afford rehab. The shelters might not be able to provide the professionals to walk them through, but they could provide the right types of meals and be a touch point connecting the addicts with methadone or other recovery drugs and somehow those shelters need to be longer than 30 to 90 days. They need months of stability to succeed and most of them will never be able to get jobs no matter how cleaned up their lives get or how hard they work. Computers screen for handcuffs keeping people out of the workforce. I actually have a worker with handcuffs but only small businesses do a compassion second chance process nowadays. We are in a different system than the rest of you.

          2. 12 step programs require people to make a decision… that’s something most folks are capable of, but are unwilling to do.. not unlike what we see with rejectong wfpb eating in the face of deadly disease. I don’t call methadone a cure by any stretch. A friend of mine has a son with a $300 per day methadone habit. He stopped caring for himself decades go. It’s not a ‘program’ that is about recovery… only addiction, sickness and death.

      1. “Scientific studies have shown that inflammatory signals in the brain play a key role in the growth of addictive behavior.

        A 2008 study published in Glia demonstrated that inflammation in the brain may not necessarily cause addiction but increases the risk of dependence on alcohol and other addictive substances.

        According to researchers from the University of Colorado Boulder, understanding the role of inflammation can be used in treating drug and alcohol addiction problems.

        The show was talking about 5 traumatic events in a childs life increases the chance of becoming an addict tenfold and there are studies of turmeric and ginger with PTSD and I started looking at the mechanisms and inflammation is one, so WFPB should be put to the test with addiction.

        “The researchers recommend that addiction treatment should not only focus on brain chemicals but target the body’s immune system and inflammation as well. Krisztina J. Kovacs, a leading researcher at Hungary’s Institute of Experimental Medicine in Budapest, states that neuroinflammation is a key component in the development of addictive behavior. She suggests that eliminating inflammatory triggers in an addict’s diet soothes inflammation in the brain and removes inflammatory pathways to reduce dependence on drugs or alcohol.”

  13. I request that Doctor Greger complete a report about the product TA65 and the reports of Michael Fossel MD PhD concerning human health. Thanks

    1. George,

      I looked up the supplement and it is about lengthening telomeres and I think Dr Greger has a video about WFPB and telomeres.

      Seems like it. I would guess Dr Ornish, but the video would have been a long time ago and I didn’t know any of the doctors names back then.
      Just that someone reversed damage. Boy, maybe just stopped it. Wow, that was a long time ago.

      1. Yup, it was there.

        Dr Ornish did a 3 month study on It.

        I can’t put the link because my cell phones copy and paste is glitchy.

        Anyway, the science is the same as the product you are pointing to but Dr Ornish accomplished it with a vegan whole food plant based diet.

        Foods to avoid were processed meal and fish.

        Processed meat shaved 14 years off the telomeres and fish shaved 6 years off.

        1. Fish and processed meat in the same sentence? Seems strange…there’s a load of difference nutrition-wise, isn’t there?

          Depends upon the fish, of course.

      2. Deb, yes Dr. Greger does have a video on here somewhere talking about how a plant based diet was shown to regrow telomeres and also a video (I think it’s a separate video, it’s been a while since I watched them) on how 12 minutes of meditation a day was shown to regrow telomeres. He also talks about telomeres in the beginning of his book, “How Not To Die.” And I highly recommend checking out this speech by Elizabeth Blackburn who won a nobel prize over her discoveries regarding telomeres: https://www.ted.com/talks/elizabeth_blackburn_the_science_of_cells_that_never_get_old?language=en

  14. A teaspoon a day seems pretty extreme, I can’t imagine that simply incorporating ginger in your diet in more regular amounts here and there wouldn’t have a positive impact. I’m sure that’s the case but if you do have fatty liver disease, a teaspoon of ginger a day is easy and safe medicine. I’m not sure organic ginger is only 5 cents a day though. I only get organic and I only get from trusted companies due to adulteration, etc.

  15. I request that Doctor Greger provide his statement of the safety and efficacy of the TA65 product and if a pharmaceutical grade of the product should be sought by consumers. Also is the dosage correct? Thanks

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