Ginger for Nausea, Menstrual Cramps, & Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Ginger for Nausea, Menstrual Cramps, & Irritable Bowel Syndrome
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Powdered ginger can be a highly effective, cheap, easy-to-use, safer treatment for nausea, migraine headaches, and menstrual blood loss and pain. Does it also work for IBS intestinal cramping?

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Ginger is most famous for its role in preventing and alleviating nausea and vomiting, with so many studies now that there are reviews of reviews. And not just in morning sickness, where just a half teaspoon of powdered ginger is associated with a five-fold likelihood of improvement in nausea and vomiting in early pregnancy; but also for motion sickness; and, also for postoperative nausea and vomiting after surgery; and preventing antiretroviral-induced nausea and vomiting during HIV treatment; and, as a miracle against chemotherapy-induced vomiting.

In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, clinical trial of ginger for breast cancer chemo, chemo-induced vomiting was relieved in all phases. Meaning, in the acute phase—within 24 hours of the chemo—ginger relieved delayed vomiting two to three days later. And, even in what’s known as anticipatory vomiting, which occurs before chemotherapy sessions. After a few times, the body knows what’s coming, and starts throwing up even at the thought of it approaching. This anticipatory nausea is something drugs can’t seem to control; even the fancy new anti-nausea drugs that can cost 10,000 times more than ginger, which comes in at about 2 pennies per dose. And, in certain ways, may work even better.

I’ve also talked about ginger and pain. An eighth teaspoon of powdered ginger—one penny—found to work as well as the migraine headache drug, Imitrex, without the side effects.

And, speaking of pain, ginger may also be as effective as ibuprofen for alleviating menstrual cramps. Painful periods are exceedingly common, and can sometimes cause severe suffering; yet, have been virtually ignored by pain management researchers and practitioners. But four randomized controlled trials have been published on ginger for menstrual pain, and all four showed significant benefit when taken just the first few days of your period. Effective doses ranged from a third of a teaspoon a day, to a full teaspoon a day. But since they all seemed to work about the same, might as well start with the penny-a-day dose.

And, as a side benefit, ginger can dramatically reduce heavy flow, which is actually one of the most common gynecological problems for young women. We know that there are pro-inflammatory foods that may contribute to heavy menstrual bleeding. So, how about try an anti-inflammatory food, like ginger? Heavy menstrual bleeding is defined as more than a third of a cup, or 80 milliliters. All the study subjects started out much higher than that, but just an eighth teaspoon of powdered ginger, three times a day, starting the day before their period, cut their flow in half. And it seemed to work better each month they tried it, providing a highly effective, cheap, easy-to-use, safer treatment for menstrual blood loss and pain.

So, works for migraines and menstrual cramps. But just because it’s effective for many types of pain, doesn’t mean it’s necessarily efficacious for all pain. For example, how about intestinal cramps? Is ginger effective for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome? And the answer is, yes, dropping IBS severity by over 25%. But so did the placebo.

And so, the real answer is, no, ginger is not effective for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome. Yet, ginger is one of the most commonly used herbal medicines for irritable bowel syndrome. Silly people, don’t they know it doesn’t work any better than a sugar pill?

Or, from another perspective: smart people, using something that offers relief 53% of the time, and doesn’t risk the adverse effects of some of the drugs—with which doctors may harm one person for every three they help.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Katie Schloer.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to Basti93 via Pixabay.

Ginger is most famous for its role in preventing and alleviating nausea and vomiting, with so many studies now that there are reviews of reviews. And not just in morning sickness, where just a half teaspoon of powdered ginger is associated with a five-fold likelihood of improvement in nausea and vomiting in early pregnancy; but also for motion sickness; and, also for postoperative nausea and vomiting after surgery; and preventing antiretroviral-induced nausea and vomiting during HIV treatment; and, as a miracle against chemotherapy-induced vomiting.

In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, clinical trial of ginger for breast cancer chemo, chemo-induced vomiting was relieved in all phases. Meaning, in the acute phase—within 24 hours of the chemo—ginger relieved delayed vomiting two to three days later. And, even in what’s known as anticipatory vomiting, which occurs before chemotherapy sessions. After a few times, the body knows what’s coming, and starts throwing up even at the thought of it approaching. This anticipatory nausea is something drugs can’t seem to control; even the fancy new anti-nausea drugs that can cost 10,000 times more than ginger, which comes in at about 2 pennies per dose. And, in certain ways, may work even better.

I’ve also talked about ginger and pain. An eighth teaspoon of powdered ginger—one penny—found to work as well as the migraine headache drug, Imitrex, without the side effects.

And, speaking of pain, ginger may also be as effective as ibuprofen for alleviating menstrual cramps. Painful periods are exceedingly common, and can sometimes cause severe suffering; yet, have been virtually ignored by pain management researchers and practitioners. But four randomized controlled trials have been published on ginger for menstrual pain, and all four showed significant benefit when taken just the first few days of your period. Effective doses ranged from a third of a teaspoon a day, to a full teaspoon a day. But since they all seemed to work about the same, might as well start with the penny-a-day dose.

And, as a side benefit, ginger can dramatically reduce heavy flow, which is actually one of the most common gynecological problems for young women. We know that there are pro-inflammatory foods that may contribute to heavy menstrual bleeding. So, how about try an anti-inflammatory food, like ginger? Heavy menstrual bleeding is defined as more than a third of a cup, or 80 milliliters. All the study subjects started out much higher than that, but just an eighth teaspoon of powdered ginger, three times a day, starting the day before their period, cut their flow in half. And it seemed to work better each month they tried it, providing a highly effective, cheap, easy-to-use, safer treatment for menstrual blood loss and pain.

So, works for migraines and menstrual cramps. But just because it’s effective for many types of pain, doesn’t mean it’s necessarily efficacious for all pain. For example, how about intestinal cramps? Is ginger effective for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome? And the answer is, yes, dropping IBS severity by over 25%. But so did the placebo.

And so, the real answer is, no, ginger is not effective for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome. Yet, ginger is one of the most commonly used herbal medicines for irritable bowel syndrome. Silly people, don’t they know it doesn’t work any better than a sugar pill?

Or, from another perspective: smart people, using something that offers relief 53% of the time, and doesn’t risk the adverse effects of some of the drugs—with which doctors may harm one person for every three they help.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Katie Schloer.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to Basti93 via Pixabay.

Doctor's Note

If placebos are so safe and effective, should doctors prescribe them? I discuss the pros and cons in The Lie That Heals: Should Doctors Give Placebos?

What does work for IBS? See:

What else can women to do make their periods more tolerable? See:

For more on ginger, check out:

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

160 responses to “Ginger for Nausea, Menstrual Cramps, & Irritable Bowel Syndrome

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  1. I listened to a lecture by Dr. Greger where he talked about chicken having more fat than some beef due to the raising practices of the chickens. Is this the case with organic chicken as well?




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    1. Organic chicken breast seems to be the same as conventional, but organic chicken thigh with skin has 22% less fat.
      I say skip the chicken and have a pita pocket , with hummus or baba ganoush , no cheese and lots of vegetables and I’ll have that with a ginger kombucha .




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        1. I got my info from Ontario Organic assc. , Stanford did a study and found no difference in the meat , only when the skin was included was there a difference of about 13%.




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    2. I would skip the chicken as well. However, to answer your question, true free range chickens that run around free all day, are leaner than those cooped up inside (or even worse in cages) 24/7. Scrutinize your source though, as most “free range” labels are meaningless.




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      1. There is also a difference between free range and cage free. Just like you said, they mislabel it all the time similarly to organic produce. But you can tell when a chicken is lean.




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          1. This discussion will never end like talking about religion so I stop here. Before I stop, ask yourself about your consideration for the little mosquitoes and slugs in your backyard.




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            1. Food for thought – Asking a chicken if it wants to die is not religion, it’s a question. The active principles in man are earth, water, fire, air, and ether. Only earth, water, fire, air, are the active principles in the animal kingdom. Egg born creatures have just water, fire and air, and insects have just fire and air. Vegetables have only water as it’s active principle, so why not sustain life from the life form with the least amount of killing on your hands.




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                    1. Aww. Good for you. Above you said you were not going to get into a discussion with easyout about killing chickens–and then you did!




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                    2. I don’t eat chicken regularly like I have to. But I eat some at social gathering.

                      The discussion with easyout started with someone asking about fat in chicken and we are merely talking about free range and happy chicken until all in a sudden the discussion about the moral of eating chicken came about. Apple and orange discussions but some people like to mix the 2 whenever they can.




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                    3. Now I don’t want to be accused of telling you what to talk about but I would venture to guess that most people hear kinda get what Easyout is saying so why not just ignore? To talk about snails and insects is just being contrary. How about a discussion about how bad chicken is for you whether it is free range or not. Wouldn’t that be more informative for someone new to this site? Just saying….
                      http://nutritionfacts.org/topics/chicken/




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                    4. Why don’t you ask Easyout why he/she started it first?

                      And you know who, why didn’t you delete posts from other people who talk about the forbidden food?




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                    5. And if you watch the interview that Dr Mercola, a meat eater, gave to Dr Greger and the 2 seem to enjoy each others. During the interview, Dr Greger even talked about the risks of eating contaminated meat and Dr Mercola didn’t say anything. See they all peaceful coexist unlike some righteous vegan people who insist that they hold the absolute truth. Like I speculate, I think they need some fish oil to calm them down.




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                    6. Jimmy. can you explain how bees busy pollinating flowers are upset or hurt by either veggies (pre-flowering) or fruit (which usually need bees or others to come into being)?




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                  1. “Don’t eat mushrooms because they’re more like animals than like plants.”

                    Curious to why you say this? Are you joking or are you serious?

                    I eat a lot of mushrooms regularly.




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                    1. I eat a lot of mushrooms too, but everyone was talking about what you shouldn’t eat. I was amused at how excited people get about telling other people what not to eat. Nutritional yeast is also fungi, so closer to animals. Shouldn’t eat that either. Nor miso. Nor tempeh. All the microorganisms are also alive, so we can tell people not to eat them either. And remember, plants have feelings, too. Spinach doesn’t want to be eaten. Neither does lettuce. They want to grow up and make seed. It is an act of violence against those plants.




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                    2. That’s exactly what I have been saying but easyout said above that insects are water and air (???). I myself have some hypocrisy of my own like I eat fish but can’t never go fishing. Or go hunting but like I told the story of people at my workplace who go hunting or otherwise there is an overpopulation of some animals. I don’t do it but certainly I don’t condemn the moral of someone who does it. Feasting on meat all the time for enjoyment is obviously wrong. Or go hunting endangered animals or just for killing for enjoyment all the time is wrong. But I don’t pass judgement on the guys who go hunting a couple of times a year or people who enjoy outdoor or fishing with their friends and family.

                      Cancer cells do have intelligence because they know how to evade the immune system and chemo.




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                    3. Plantstrong doc, my guess is, Jimmy thinks differently from most, making connections that can be fruitful (as with cancers showing intelligence or motivation) or off the wall, as with pollinating bees suffering.




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              1. Interesting– but most Greeks got along with 4 elements till that mystic Plato added a fifth.
                I wonder how you integrate the Chinese five elements, which drop ether and air, and add metal and wood?




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    3. Since this discussion went all sorts of haywire down below-I’ll throw out my nickel’s worth of ideas on it, compressed into a single statement: When one embraces the WFPB lifestyle as I have, his animal product intake (IF ANY) falls to such a tiny percentage of his/her caloric intake such that there is no need to consider the possible health differences between the various methods of producing such products. Explained in other words: IF I’m only going to have ONE soda per year, it’s highly unlikely that it matters if it is genuine Coca-cola, Diet Pepsi, or Fanta Grape. My body is perfectly capable of handling such threats at that rate. Note I’m not discussing life and morality, just health.




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      1. Or most directly on point to Abby’s inquiry: Making animals “happier/healthier/oranic-ier” doesn’t make eating them enough _healthier_ to recommend it from a purely nutritional standpoint.




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  2. Since the topic keeps coming up, I’m wondering who funded all these studies on ginger? It seems to me, that whoever funded these studies should be encouraged to study other foods as well. (Unless, of course, it was the “Big Ginger” growers themselves.)




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    1. Well ginger has been used for thousand of years for medicinal purpose with good results. It’s only now that the scientific world is catching up and you can either wait until they prove it or you just consume it based on intuition and the effects and benefits that you see on yourself.




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    2. Research departments in developing nations often self-fund trials on their traditional medical practices, and one can imagine all sorts of motivations from the cost of imported drugs to cultural pride behind this. This is the case for the five Iranian studies at the core of this video (1, 2, 3, 4, 5), and in the last of these an Iranian manufacturer of ginger powder capsules provided them for the study. The other two research studies (rather than reviews) cited above were funded out of NIH grants (6, 7).




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      1. Darryl, Thanks for your reply. Interesting how the research world is so interrelated and driven by different motives and interests. Almost as complex as the nutrition that is being studied :-) I guess I was naively hoping that some altruistic organization would fund some nutrition studies purely for the benefit of mankind. I’m getting too accustomed to the generosity of Dr Greger and all the other knowledgeable commenters here!




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        1. Hal, keep getting accustomed to others’ contributions, and the result may be a deeper understanding that at least we among species have survived this long, approaching a quarter-million years, by cooperating and sharing more than by conflict and competing.
          Putting that realization into effect will do the world wonders in the coming year…




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      1. Lida Krieger: I have some experience with this. I don’t think hot water is a good idea since the ginger not only will not evaporate, but the strength could become to much too quickly. I say that because of my experiments with mixing powdered ginger with some cool water and just letting it sit for a few minutes. I don’t remember how long I waited, but it wasn’t hours. And the mixture was so strong it almost burned drinking it. It was definitely unpleasant.

        For myself, I found the best way to do it if I’m going to consume powdered ginger is to put in about 1/3 cup (I’m guessing) water in a cup. Add the powdered ginger and mix with a spoon. Drink quickly without breathing through my nose. Keep stirring or swishing so that too much of the powdered ginger does not stick to the sides of the cup or sink to the bottom.

        If you don’t mind a little grit in your liquid, this method works fairly well. Since it’s only a small amount of water, it doesn’t take too long. But for myself, I’m still hoping to find a better/more pleasant way to try getting ginger-sourced relief.

        If you try it, let us know how it goes. I’d be curious what your experiences are, whether it is with water or some other method.




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          1. Benjamin Dowell: If you are talking ginger root as opposed to powdered ginger, I would think you could make a ginger cold brew work great. Other people on this tread are reporting making ginger tea and enjoying it.

            (Note: My comment was only about powdered ginger, which is about all I have experimented with so far. Why did I try so hard with the powdered ginger? My thinking was that the studies are on whole ginger – powered or otherwise as opposed to ginger flavored water. So, I wanted to try to get all the goodness out of the ginger that I could/replicate the studies as best I could. But maybe ginger tea is the way to go. If it works for someone, why not. And a tea would have to be a lot more pleasant than what I was trying I would thing.)




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        1. Hi, I tried to do an experiment with half cold water and half hot water, mixing 1 table spoon ginger powder with some lemon juice. Either drink it gradually or I would then set that cup aside and add a few spoon of it to a cup of a drink hot or cold throughout the day? gingerol which is one of the ingredients that contributes to its health properties in the root will be slightly less in ginger powder
          , but it also appears to increase levels of other compounds, such as shogaols, which appear to have impressive medicinal benefits and may be even more potent than gingerol. Plus, ground ginger is more convenient to cook with, so you’ll probably use more of it. I make ginger tea with some mint and lemon and fresh ginger and that is very refereshing.




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          1. Foroogh: How did your experiment go? Did you find it worked well for you?

            Interesting info about gingerol vs shogaols in powdered vs fresh ginger. Thanks!




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            1. It went well! I must admit I like the fresh ginger in food. However I got inspired to use more powder ginger in my baking like scones ! and I shall share the recipe if it turns out nice!




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        2. I LOVE the tea I drink every day. I mince a small handful of fresh ginger root (I scrub it but only peel it if it isn’t organic), add that to a one quart thermal carafe. Add 1/2 teaspoon powdered turmeric (or another small handful minced fresh turmeric), 1/8 teaspoon black pepper, stevia to taste, then add one tea bag Earl Grey and one green tea and pour boiled water over. Steep a few minutes before removing the tea bags. I’ve been drinking this daily for several years and recently found that any of these ingredients help prevent cancer. I knew that many were antioxidants.

          I don’t suppose you get every bit of goodness out of the ginger and turmeric, since you don’t actually eat them, but it’s an easy way to get lots of their bennies. And I suppose you could strain out the ginger and eat it after steeping the tea.




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    1. I try to put ginger in my veggie but it gives me an unpleasant burning sensation in my throat and my veggie becomes unpleasant to drink. But I do the same thing by blending ginger and garlic and some cabbage to make a brine for my sauerkraut and I can eat the sauerkraut without feeling the burning on ginger. Same thing with putting ginger in my hot tea. It all depends on how you consume it and ginger will give a different sensation. But as long as it all goes into your stomach then it doesn’t matter.




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  3. I drink ginger root tea daily. A piece of ginger root in hot water makes a great tea and it has helped my cranky digestion. I also put a piece of ginger root in my lemon water. I cook with ginger so I consume a lot of ginger with no side effects only improvements!




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      1. My digestion was stressed due to years of diagnosed celiac disease. I have less cramping and abdominal tension when I consume ginger. I cut some slits into the chunk of ginger to release juice and just use it like a tea bag with boiling water. Great for motion sickness when traveling.




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  4. As a former migraine sufferer, it’s been decades since I’ve have a headache. I suspect going vegan, especially no cheese helped. Although I still get ocular migraines, which affect vision for about 20 mins, but are painless. I also had strobe light effects in my peripheral vision almost 24/7. Then I heard that bananas can cause migraines. When I cut then out of my morning breakfast routine the problems stopped except a few random events. I mentioned this to an allergist and she said, right, and ripe avocado can trigger migraines too. When I keep both our if my diet I have no problem, and occasional consumption send to be ok. So a great way to deal with migraines is to avoid getting them through diet. ;-)
    Mark G.




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    1. Mark, Wow! Thanks for that. My husband gets the aura type migraines (not the really nasty full-blown, nausea and vomiting ones), so I’m excited about the prospects for him to maybe get off drugs…




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      1. My allergist said it was because both contained “x” and I can’t remember what x is. It occurs in ripe bananas and ripe avocados. The more ripe the more there is of this substance. But there are other things that are triggers for other people, like the sulfates in wine or something in chocolate (which never seemed to bother me). I think you should be able to search “migraine triggers” or “migraine foods” and you’ll get back lists of the most common things. I remember there being a top 5 list of migraine foods. So, you might want to explore those against your husband’s diet. Food diaries also come in handy, even if you just list what you have within the past 24 hours after an event. After enough events you might start to see patterns. Good luck.




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  5. I, too, consume a lot of ginger. So I always keep a bunch of it in the freezer (fresh root) cut into manageable sized chunks an inch or two long. Then when I need some I just pop it into the microwave to defrost. The freezing process breaks down some of the fiber in the root making it easier to cut/mince/pound/whatever. The root becomes juicer.
    I also love to put minced ginger root in my beans. It’s especially good and interesting in split pea soup where you get a little blast of ginger every so often. Very fun! But I wonder, now, if the ginger doesn’t also ease the intestinal discomfort that beans can cause.




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        1. If you use it fast enough (within a couple of weeks) you can just keep it in the crisper. Just don’t wrap it in plastic or anything else. If the cut end gets too dry, shave off a tiny slice before cutting what you want. The Cook’s Illustrated people tested various ways of keeping ginger and they discovered what I had. Don’t wrap it and it keeps better. If you don’t use it quickly enough, do as Guest says, cut into manageable sizes and freeze it.




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    1. “But I wonder, now, if the ginger doesn’t also ease the intestinal discomfort that beans can cause.”

      From what I read, the gas from consuming beans is actually healthy and it comes from the bacteria that breaks down the beans. So since ginger is supposed to help the beneficial bacteria and not suppress it then it won’t help. But there is “technique” to prevent gas from beans :)

      http://www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/2012/05/why-beans-give-you-gas/

      You might have resigned yourself to the fact you can never eat beans before going on a first date, but fret not! There are some methods to prevent your noxious abdominal expulsions. For instance, there is a type of mold called Aspergillus niger that contains an enzyme (Alpha-Galactosidase) that will break down Oligosaccharides, preventing your large intestinal bacteria from creating gas. You can buy it at stores everywhere under the auspicious name “Beano“. If you don’t want to be seen sprinkling your beans with this product, you can always try soaking your beans in water for several hours before you make your food. This softens the beans and allows them to ferment. The yeast produced can consume the offending Oligosaccharides and help leave your dinner date vapor-free!




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    2. I freeze mine, too! Then I defrost it and cut it into small pieces (actually I use kitchen shears). I refreeze the chunks for tea and smoothies




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  6. So great that it has been demonstrated that a natural, harmless compound is effective against nausea. The drugs we have, can have really nasty side effects – dyskinesias, dystonia, hallucinations, gynecomastia (enlargement of a man’s breasts) and rarely cardiac arrest….just to name a few….




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  7. I buy the whole ginger root, slice it thin, and ferment it. THen I put it on my green salad. If it’s good for anti-inflammation, I want to try it during or after my most intense workouts, which for me is baseball. Also ginger, radish, onion, garlic, horseradish, all spicy vegies seem to cut down parasites/excess fungi in our systems, from what I’ve read.




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      1. Exactly, sugar can pull water into the digestive tract and make diarrhoea worse! The ‘old remedy’ of lemonade is a BAD idea!




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    1. I am not an expert on IBS but I see people fixing it by taking fiber pill. They cannot eat a lot of fiber from plant foods and have to rely on pill. IBS is caused by something that irritates the lining of the stomach and causes people to want to go to the bathroom constantly when they don’t need to. So I think that ginger will irritate the stomach while it also brings benefits. So in order for you to consume ginger, you may need to consume it while you are consuming fiber, pill or real plant foods.




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  8. I switched from coffee to ginger tea a couple of years ago – and then from the bagged ginger tea to 1/4 tsp organic ground ginger from my spice drawer. After several months I added an additional scant 1/4 tsp of ground turmeric to the tea. I drink several cups a day maybe from three to six. Listening to this I began to wonder if I might be actually getting too much of these spices. Has anyone heard of this being a problem with long-term use?




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    1. Jackie Jardine: I don’t have an answer to your last question, but I thought you would be interested to know that the pukka brand of teas makes a flavor called “three ginger”. The ingredients are ginger root, galangal root, licorice root, turmeric root, and ginger essential oil flavour. When you mentioned making tea with ginger and turmeric, it reminded me of the pukka tea.




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    2. In an otherwise ‘normal’ healthy adult, I have read an upper limit of 4g per day of ginger suggested as safe, down to 1g per day if pregnant.
      http://umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/herb/ginger

      With care taken in gallstones, bleeding disorders, diabetes, if on Warfarin and/or other blood-thinners, diabetes medications or anti-hypertensive agents. For example-
      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4338259/

      Too much usually manifests as diarrhoea, nausea, skin irritation.

      This study has an interesting discussion on safety and mineral content, it was based on 5g fresh/1g dry ginger daily-
      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4356677/




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  9. Is there any data to suggest that the methylcobalamin form of B12 is completely safe?

    I have seen the B12 videos on this website, but I’d be grateful to know if anyone here has had success using methylcobalamin instead of cyanocobalamin. I am aware of the cyanide issue (non-issue for some) but I do have concerns about there being no long-term data or even short-term data regarding safety of methylcobalamin, and by data I mean some real hard science, clear and unbiased. Thanks if anyone has any info. on this. I do have my concerns with the methylcobalmin form. SO many people (and companies) pump and promote this form over others. That alone raises red-flag for me.

    The other side of this is that the cyano form of B12 never led to a raised B12 level in me, nor a lowering of MMA and Homocysteine, yet the hydroxocobalmin and methyl forms did achieve this, a bit. Just not sure of the safety, with lack of credible (it seems) safety data.




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    1. I don’t know the difference between the 2. Somewhere I read (and it could come from Dr Greger) that Vit B12 is one of the Vit that is so easily absorbed by most people and so you don’t have to be picky about the brand and type that you use. Personally I use a cheap Costco brand and it works on my leg cramp. But if the methylcobalamin form works for you then use it. I would not concern about the cyanide because it’s tny. A lot of fruit seeds, in particular peach seed, contain cyanide as well but it’s tiny and it won’t hurt you if you eat it.




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    2. Belinda H.: That’s a really great, well informed question, along with some good personal data.
      .
      Dr. Greger’s book just came out less than a year ago, and he was still saying that the methyl and hydro versions have, “insufficient evidence to support [their] efficacy…” I’m sure Dr. Greger would have mentioned if there were studies showing long problems with those forms. So, I’m guessing the information you are looking for, either positive or negative, just does not exist right now.
      .
      That seems like a real shame to me since people like you who seems to see a benefit from the methyl or hydro varieties really need a clear answer.
      .
      Good luck. I hope you can come up with a solution that you are comfortable with.




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    3. Belinda H, you may have a genetic polymorphism called MethylTetraHydroFolateReductase (MTHFR). It is actually quite common for people to have one or two genes (from one parent or both). This prevents or makes difficult, effective methylation, an essential function which your body does zillions of times a second. The methylcobalamin is already methylated, so it works much better for those of us who have this anomaly. Like you, the cyano type didn’t raise by B12 levels, but the methyl form did, quite effectively. I also take a methylated form of folate, which has probably helped as well.




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      1. Yeah, but the concern is that there is no data showing safety with using the methylated form of B12. For all we know this could be triggering abnormal growth/cell growth in body. I am highly suspect of the safety of the methyl form of B12, and would not be surprised if long-term use of it ends up doing people in a way that can not be foreseen now. Something so unnatural about these forms of vitamins. And not one of the companies seems able to provide any safety data showing that it “does not cause harm.”




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        1. Agreed, can be frustrating! I have found safety data on high doses, or up to one-year follow up but not much more :( Apparently there was a trial started in Japan, that was large-scale randomized and double blinded in order to evaluate the long-term efficacy and the safety of ultra-high-dose methylcobalamin for sporadic or familial cases of ALS, but I haven’t seen the results.

          Some safety discussion here too- http://www.efsa.europa.eu/sites/default/files/scientific_output/files/main_documents/815.pdf




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          1. NFmoderatorRenae: I imagine even knowing about the 1 year is helpful. If someone could use it confidently for a year, they could then see where they are at and assess the situation. Good to know!




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            1. Thea completely different topic but I just purchased this massive Jackfruit yesterday. Amazing. I have never tackled it before. First off it tastes amazing! Supposedly you can boil the seeds and they resemble mashed potatoes? The fruit flesh reminds me of a cross between cantaloupe and banana. And I took some of the stringy flesh and made BBQ sandwiches for dinner last night.

              Of course I had to watch Raw Christina to figure out what to do with the massive thing. Real cool. 25 pounds!




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              1. WFPBRunner: Wow! That’s a great picture. And a massive fruit.
                .
                I’ve actually seen one of those things at a veggie conference a couple of years ago. It was part of a commercial booth that was selling a jackfruit line of products. I would never have been brave enough to buy one. Good for you! I am truly impressed.
                .
                I have a friend who gets cans of water-packed jackfruit from a local Asian market. She dumps it in her slow cooker along with barbeque sauce and some chopped bell peppers to make something that is probably close to what you made.
                .
                I had heard about the flesh, but I hadn’t hear about boiling the seeds before. So, you not only gave me an entertaining post, but an educational one as well. :-) Enjoy your jackfruit!




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                1. The seeds have a tough outer skin that I am currently soaking in an attempt to remove. I’ll let you know what I figure out.

                  Very fun.




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                  1. “The seeds have a tough outer skin that I am currently soaking in an attempt to remove. I’ll let you know what I figure out.”

                    You don’t have to. Just boil it. I have eaten it previously.




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                2. Also I have tried the canned jackfruit. Completely different thing. Maybe when they can it they process it earlier–less ripe? This is a pretty light salmon color.




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                  1. WFPBRunner: That makes sense to me. Canned peaches and fresh peaches have a different texture. I can totally believe that canned jackfruit is different too. Now that makes me want to try the fresh stuff. Hmmmm.




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                  2. Canned fruit has sugar and I am not sure if the nutrients are retained. Now Dr Greger has an upcoming video on canned fruit and I am looking forward to see it.




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              2. You can eat the whole jackfruit except for the needle outside. You eat primarily the flesh but you can eat the fiber surrounding it and people in Asia stir fry it. And you can boil the seeds and eat like walnut. Basically this is a fruit that you can consume entirely. The skin is probably eatable too except that you need to grind the needle.




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                    1. Jimmy: This is another warning: Time to stop with the snide comments. Please review the posting rules. You can find the posting rules on the FAQ page which is linked to at the bottom of any NutritionFacts page.




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            2. Better than nothing! But follow-up of one year doesn’t rule out cancer and other slow growing mutations/changes etc .. unfortunately!




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          2. Thanks. So many vegans take this issue a bit too lightly, in my opinion. Fact of the matter is…..we’re taking an isolated nutrient and ingesting in a large dose, regardless of the form or absorption rate, and who knows, even if not all absorbed….who knows what possible long-term effects this could be having on immune system, DNA, offspring….future generations. Simply said, an experiment that many assume is completely harmless. I know of people who have had horrific experiences with B12 pills.




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            1. Exactly. Like most it ends up being a pro/con analysis… B12 deficiency causes terrible and often permanent neurological damage… But I too am cautious of the ‘take regardless’ approach if one has high B12 serum, active B12, and low MMA/homocysteine levels and NO symptoms or any deficiencies..




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    4. Another issue with supplements is the long term consequences of consuming the fillers etc used in manufacturing tablets and capsules. Adulteration risks are always a concern too.




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    5. Here Belinda, I have found an answer for your question from the expert. In a nutshell, the 2 types are the same.

      https://www.consumerlab.com/reviews/_/bvitamins/

      ConsumerLab.com Answers

      Question:
      Being over 50 years old, I’m looking to take a vitamin B-12 supplement. I see that many contain a form of vitamin B-12 called cyanocobalamin, yet I read on the Internet that this form is toxic. Should I be concerned?

      Answer:
      The most common form of vitamin B-12 (cobalamin) in supplements is cyanocobalamin and although this form includes a cyanide molecule, it is very safe. Why? Even at a very high dose, it would provide about a thousand times less cyanide than is toxic, and the cyanide is excreted in the urine.

      B-12 is also commonly available in supplements as methylcobalamin. Supplements with both types of B-12 are included in the B Vitamin Supplements Review and the Multivitamin Review.

      Some non-authoritative websites claim that methylcobalamin is better absorbed or more bioavailable than cyanocobalamin, but there is no clinical evidence supporting this claim. Other sites suggest that methylcobalamin supplements cannot yield one of the important, active metabolites of B-12, but this is not correct. More information about this, and another form of B-12, hydroxocobalamin, is found in the “Cobalamin (B-12)” section of the B Vitamin Supplements




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  10. Is there any research on ginger helping with the nausea from CVS – cyclic vomiting syndrome? My dear, sweet nephew suffers greatly from it.




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    1. There is no evidence that ginger will treat it. But it doesn’t hurt to try because ginger is harmless. If the symptom aggravates then simply stop consuming ginger. But just like in the video, Dr Greger said that ginger only treats IBS in 50% of the case, same as the placebo, but it does not hurt to try because there is no harm.

      https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/health-topics/digestive-diseases/cyclic-vomiting-syndrome/Pages/facts.aspx

      Now I wonder how they tried placebo of ginger because of its distinctive taste.




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      1. Probably similar to how they make ‘watermelon flavour gum’, or ‘orange flavour soda’… artificial flavours can be very convincing!




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        1. In the old days when I don’t know anything about real foods, I used to eat ginger candy made in Indonesia and you can tell that it is made of real ginger because it gives a warm sensation when it goes through my throat. Now I use real ginger because I know how to incorporate it in my diet but a couple of years ago. I took a ginger supplement and a couple of times I felt the burning when the outside gelatin broke prematurely in my throat. Plus I cough ginger dust through my nose. It is pretty hilarious!




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    2. Hi Mai! Sorry to hear about your nephew!

      Here is one study that incorporated ginger-
      https://www.google.com/patents/US20140271943

      There is a case report here-
      http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/abs/10.1089/act.2013.19206?journalCode=act

      Some discussion of dietary prevention here-
      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2886424/

      These may be helpful, but do have a pay-wall sorry!
      http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11938-007-0070-7
      http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11938-005-0041-9

      In addition I would recommend (if he hasn’t already!)- a WFPB diet, a full gastrointestinal medical work up and even an allergy test (especially dairy).

      Hope you find something that helps!




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      1. Wow! Thanks for all of the info! Yes, he has had all kinds of tests and scopes. I will definitely look into this new information.
        I really appreciate your thoughtful answer.




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  11. This is off topic. I found this statement under Dr. Greger’s name and wondered what the compatible connection would be between the Humane’s Society and animal agriculture and what is Dr. Gregory’s role would be. It stated ‘Currently Dr. Greger proudly serves as the Director of Public Health and Animal Agriculture at the Humane Society of the United States.”. Thank you for your clarification.




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      1. There are a lot of ironic situations that arise with the humane societies . I once looked after a farmers stall for a day at a very busy farmers market , across from where my table was , there was a pony ride set up. There were 4 ponies walking around in a circle with saddles on to give kids a ride . With each pony was a girl who walked with the pony , lifting kids on and off after their ride . What confused me was every 2 hours they would put all the ponies in a big trailer and bring out 4 new ponies . I asked the owner why he did that? Well he said it all had to do with the humane society , they required him to give each pony 2 hours of walking and two hours of hay ,water and a clean place to lay down to rest .Oh I said , well what about the girls , when do they get a break? Well he said I’ve been doing this for years and almost everyday somebody complains to the humane society about the ponies but never have I had a complaint about the girls.
        So you see it depends on what type of animal you are.
        Humane societies probably have a rating system and my guess it goes like this.
        Dogs 10
        Cats 9
        Horses 7
        Cows 4
        Chickens 2
        Girls 0




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        1. The “Girls” have this thing called “The Fair Labor Standards’Act” brought about by our labor activists and FDR in the 1930’s. Before that the “Girls” could be under the age of 15 and they could walk those ponies all day long without a lunch or rest break. They also did not have an 8 hour work day and a 40 hour work week. Before the FLSA child labor in the USA was the norm.




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          1. This is Canada and there is no minimum wage for farm workers . Which is what his horse operation falls under. There were no breaks for the girls at all , no lunch or breaks except for a couple minutes while he changed ponies.
            Anyways I only meant to point out the huge difference between lets say dogs and poultry standards of living conditions . In other words if I looked after my dogs like farmers grow poultry I would be jailed.




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  12. Does Ginger treat ADHD? It’s like there’s a red light going on and off in my house every 30 minutes. I guess it says “thanks.”




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    1. I don’t think so. But feeling/being healthier as a result of WFPB has indeed helped reduce my “frustration-blow-ups”. They still happen, but are not initiated or compounded by health issues any more.

      I feel that the best thing for us with ADHD is working with behavioral coaches to find our “successes” and systems that work for us and to have regular support in establishing/maintaining/repeating those behaviors that help us become most functional and productive.

      I’m not able to hire the coach I like right now, but am looking for a “body double” type person (some other person near my age with ADHD) that I can exchange support with on a daily basis. It might take a few tries, but this appears to be the best way for me to enhance my executive functioning AND to help another.

      Not easy to find such person. The coaches are making money (nothing wrong with that), the Groups are hours away in Big City (commuting makes me crazy(er)), and then others think taking a pill will fix it (small pool of prospects). I’m going to explore finding such in Social Media, but have to word it carefully or become even more of an outcast.




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      1. “frustration-blow-ups” or simply inability to stay calm can be fixed with good Omega-3 oil (fish oil or algae oil) and melatonin supplement. Magnesium too.




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    2. Ginger does not treat ADHD directly but it does indirectly because it contains zinc which is part of the cure for ADHD. Alternatively, you can take a zinc supplement or eat foods rich in zinc. Ginger will also reduce the side effect of ADHD drug if you are taking a drug. But I recommend you to strongly to take a look at zinc because zinc deficiency is the leading cause.

      Unless you eat oysters or shellfish in general, I recommend you to take a supplement (vegan if you want) because other foods don’t contain sufficient zinc unless you eat a lot.

      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20034331

      https://draxe.com/saying-no-to-the-fda%E2%80%99s-drug-pushing-agenda/

      Foods High In Zinc:
      Oysters, beef liver, lima beans, chickpeas, split peas, raw cashews, raw pecans, parmesan cheese, ginger root, sesame seeds, pumpkin seeds, calves liver, shellfish, shrimp, and venison.

      https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Zinc-HealthProfessional/




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        1. Glad to hear that zinc fixes your ADHD problem. You may want to add a few more foods for the brain also such as magnesium, selenium and melatonin. I don’t usually post what brands of supplement I used because it sounds like I am selling something but I am helping you with your medical issue so I take the liberty to post them but of course you can choose to buy any brand you want. Not all supplements are created equal and so I pick the brand very carefully and it does not cost much.

          Zinc:

          https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0098U0QC0/ref=sns_myd_detail_page

          Magnesium:

          https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000LLULUM/ref=sns_myd_detail_page

          Melatonin:

          https://www.amazon.com/Life-Extension-Melatonin-Released-Vegetarian/dp/B00CDABRUW/ref=sr_1_1_a_it?ie=UTF8&qid=1473492512&sr=8-1&keywords=life+extension+melatonin

          Selenium:

          https://www.amazon.com/Life-Extension-Selenium-Complex-Capsules/dp/B009EA6FZG/ref=sr_1_1_a_it?ie=UTF8&qid=1473492631&sr=8-1&keywords=life+extension+selenium

          I hope that this post will go to your e-mail because it will be deleted by the forum cop.

          And hope that you will get well.




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  13. I know this doesn’t have to do with the video but i wanted to get an opinion. I have been vegetarian for a year but recently decided to go plant based, Is it safe to continue eating this way while breastfeeding? (I have a 14 month old so she mainly eats solids at this point but still nurses a few times a day)




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  14. _OFF TOPIC_ I posted a pic of my supper the other night over there at “Social Media 1” (FB). It has drawn a lot of compliments/comments/likes from my pool of friends-many of whom are amateur athletic types, but then MOST of them are regular Westernized eaters and suffering from exactly that (whether they know it or not). The dish is mashed potatoes. I made the potatoes tasty, then dressed them up a bit with greens, peppers, and home-grown tomatoes. Lesson I learned is to really keep after presentation no matter how healthy or tasty a dish may be. Let the EYES feast before the mouth.

    details: fresh potatoes mashed with most of their skins, with onion, okra, garlic, sweet pepper added at end of boil/steeped and mashed into the mix-various seasonings. It’s just not difficult or expensive to eat well.

    https://scontent-atl3-1.xx.fbcdn.net/t31.0-8/13958043_10208329184559527_2095064948758451144_o.jpg




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  15. As a single case study sample (me) on the use of ginger to help with severe diverticulitis/intestinal pain. A year ago was my first diagnosis with it, and I found out before and after the diagnosis, eating ginger and putting it into recipes, helped significantly with the pain. Discovered this quite by accident, noticing it after consuming pickled ginger directly along with some veggie sushi. Tested it out with just the ginger several times on its own, and always had a reduction of intestinal pain. After resolving the diverticulitis over the winter via fasting and a few other therapies (including Allimax garlic pills), I had a recurrence of it several weeks ago. Seemed to be brought on by a binge of red wine, bread and dark chocolate over a few days. Again, the use of ginger eased the pain, and a very restricted diet for 1 week (mostly rice/beans, oatmeal, fresh kale/spinach/carrot juices, steamed veggies and a little bit of fresh greens), no coffee, sugar, wheat, nor artificial sweeteners of any kind, VSL #3 probiotics, and the following onion soup has seemingly resolved the latest bout of DV pain:

    It is an easy/lazy recipe that may help (aside from just eating raw ginger and/or pickled ginger) and I enjoy, is to take a McDougall Spring Onion soup (just add water, and sold at a number of stores) and punch it up with raw ginger – about 1 tsp diced, 1/4 tsp of tumeric,1/4 tsp smoked paprika, some dried garlic, chili peppers and a squeeze of lime juice. Fresh cilantro/extra spring onions as desired. The extra spices means a bit more water and more soup, if desired! It is very low calories, pretty filling and the sodium content is not horribly high. All of the spices all seem to help with infection and/or inflammation and makes it taste pretty darn good, too!




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  16. It’s odd to me when people say “placebo is as effective as treatment, therefore treatment doesn’t work”. That’s not really true. If the treatment helped the patient, irrespective of comparing it to placebo or other treatments, it still worked. It’s just that it’s not uniquely effective. If ginger helps xyz% patients with something, but so does placebo, ginger still works, keep treating with it!




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    1. Yes, I agree with the notion that “placebos that work, work”. Andrew Weil taught me that. Change your brain and the body follows. The brain can often find a way-once you get personality/beliefs out of the way. But of course “placebo” is a “dirty word” in our science and marketing of DRUGS not cures. When one is MOST interested in the healing powers of the body and mind-“placebo effect” becomes a non-threatening concept. It’s actually a quite wonderful one if you think about it.

      Think better, the mind is plastic. WE CAN “change our spots” even if the Leopard cannot.

      Brain researcher Lara Boyd: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LNHBMFCzznE




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  17. Any pearls of knowledge on whether to counsel patients on dried powdered ginger vs whole ginger?

    Looks like most of the studies use powdered ginger




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  18. _off topic_ amoxicillin for a week

    I’m taking antibiotics for a dental issue right now. Are there (extra) things I can do to shorten the impact this will have on my gut flora? I eat flaxseed and am 90-95% WFPB. I didn’t see anything on point in my search here and don’t care to wade through all the various junk I’ll pull up out on the WWW-when I can expect better answers from like-minded folks if I get any answers here.

    thanks!




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    1. You may want to take some probiotics supplement because antibiotics kill your gut (beneficial) bacteria. In fact, everybody need to take probiotics supplement all the time.




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  19. __please see my antibiotics post below/above (depending on your sort order)_ this post has naught to do with nutrition._ thanks

    Also, since my computer died, and I’m now on a different OS, and don’t have all the add-ons, plug-ins, and SCRIPT BLOCKERS just right yet. Also Also, because the second pages here won’t load for me right now-and I “allowed” another script–in hopes of making the second/third/fourth pages load up.

    THEN I got hit with that pop-in-over-under-down bit of complete aggravation/distraction “subscribe to us” like you never been here before junk.

    I have isolated the source. It is OptinMonster. You’ll find the script named “optnmnstr.com” on this page if you look-along with a dozen others. (this is the web that ties the WWW together so they can sell you more stuff and track you to the edge of space).

    SO I killed that one for permanent. So terribly obnoxious.

    http://optinmonster.com/ for reference only, to be clear I despise what their products do to my brains-and how I have to struggle to get back to “not distracted/pissed”.




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  20. TURMERIC AS ANTI NAUSEA during chemotherapy…what dose, how is it taken (in water?), how often, (before or after chemo), and with or without food? Thanks so much for your answer!!




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  21. Hello! Interesting video. Would ginger also help with endometriosis? The research in the field seems scarce when it comes to pill/surgery-free alternatives to treat this disease. What quantity of fresh ginger should be used? Thank you,




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  22. The ginger root is only as good as the country of origin. The USA is awash with fraudulently, approved Chinese so called “organic” ginger root. Ask your shop or store or supermarket where the ginger is from. If you don’t want to consume ginger that is soaked in the run off from factories pouring out effluent onto Chinese farm land, best to get them to change their buyers who use a different source, Peru for example has quality ginger root.




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  23. I have had heartburn issues from Ginger tea, but not if it is cooked in food. My question is, if I took powered ginger in a capsule; will it be as effective if I take it with food? (and not give me heartburn!)

    I am thinking about it for migraines…if I get one again.




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    1. Thanks for your comment Lisa.

      I highly recommend you to watch the following video by Dr Greger.

      In the video mentioned, you will find a study that examined “100 patients who had acute migraine without aura were randomly allocated to receive either ginger powder or sumatriptan. Time of headache onset, its severity, time interval from headache beginning to taking drug and patient self-estimation about response for five subsequent migraine attacks were recorded by patients. Patients, satisfaction from treatment efficacy and their willingness to continue it was also evaluated after 1 month following intervention. Two hours after using either drug, mean headaches severity decreased significantly. Efficacy of ginger powder and sumatriptan was similar.”

      In here, “subjects were instructed to take only one capsulet upon headache onset. Each ginger capsulet contained 250 mg powder of ginger rhizome”.

      Therefore, it seems that taking these could be an effective strategy for helping migraines.




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  24. For the anticipatory vomiting did you have to take the ginger during the anticipatory window or the earlier Pavlovian response training window?




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  25. For women who get infrequent periods.. would it be best to avoid ginger? If ginger reduces blood loss, could it also worsen conditions such as amenorrhea?




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  26. Where does the blood go if the flow is halted like that? It can’t “un-make” the lining….so what is happening here just he rate or the amount?




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  27. What I found REALLY helpful about 3 months ago, was the omega 3 (EPA
    & DHA) supplementation. I’ve been a vegan for 12 years now (I’m 32)
    and after quitting oral contraception about 4 years ago, I started to
    feel heavy menstrual cramps, nausea and diarrhea (symptoms of
    dysmenorrhea ). Now, after 3 months, I only feel a small discomfort,
    nothing
    compared to the previous. I believe this fatty acids are helping to
    decrease the prostaglandins (associated with the inflammatory process).
    Every woman should try it. I take 2-3 vegan omega 3 capsules a
    day. Hope this helps! :D




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    1. Thanks for your comment Ashley.

      According to this review:

      “Clearly, further research is required to address the mechanisms of actions and the active principles of this plant. However, available data suggest that maca has several important biological properties, and scientific evidence of these properties could be important for farmers, dealers, and consumers. Furthermore, it is necessary to demonstrate the biological effects of specific secondary metabolites of maca and their actions when added as a mixture.

      Maca is a plant with great potential as an adaptogen and appears to be promising as a nutraceutical in the prevention of several diseases. Scientific evidence showed effects on sexual behavior, fertility, mood, memory, osteoporosis, metabolism, and the treatment of some tumor entities. However, the active principles behind each effect are still unknown. Macamides have been described as novel compounds of maca that have not been found in any other plant species so far [13]. It is suggested that this lipid fraction of maca may be responsible for the increase in sexual behavior [13, 23]. Studies on testicular function, spermatogenesis, fertility, mood, memory, and prostatic hyperplasia [16, 35, 42, 75] were performed with aqueous extracts that contain only trace amounts of macamides [17]. This suggests that compounds other than macamides are responsible for these activities.”

      Hope this answer helps.




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  28. Ok, so I tried it. I didn’t believe it. BUT WOW! I went from 7 day periods to just 3-4 days! The flow was drastically reduced also. I am amazed. I did find one month I got it again 2 weeks later…so I’m not sure how good this is really…..
    Just wanted to chime in on the yeah- this is legit. I’m not easily fooled by placebo- in fact, even legit medicines do not work for me. So this is huge!
    I take the powder in a chai drink i make up. I don’t measure or count. I have maybe 1-4 glasses. I probably use more than the 1/8t though. I just shake the jar into my mug along with other spices and fill with hot water, almond milk, and drink up!
    The whole, getting my period gain after 2 weeks is a bit of a bummer, I’m technically having my period twice as often so I may stop treatment if i find this time it comes again after 2 weeks.




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  29. Ok, so I tried it. I didn’t believe it. BUT WOW! I went from 7 day periods to just 3-4 days! The flow was drastically reduced also. I am amazed. I did find one month I got it again 2 weeks later…so I’m not sure how good this is really…..
    Just wanted to chime in on the yeah- this is legit. I’m not easily fooled by placebo- in fact, even legit medicines do not work for me. So this is huge!
    I take the powder in a chai drink i make up. I don’t measure or count. I have maybe 1-4 glasses. I probably use more than the 1/8t though. I just shake the jar into my mug along with other spices and fill with hot water, almond milk, and drink up!
    The whole, getting my period gain after 2 weeks is a bit of a bummer, I’m technically having my period twice as often so I may stop treatment if i find this time it comes again after 2 weeks.

    Now i read that it does increase gall bladder contractions- i have suspected gallstones and it explains my terrible pains I’m feeling right now….this can be dangerous if it lodges a stone in the duct so i better chill on it i think. Could be a godsend to other healthy women though!




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