Best Food for Hay Fever (Seasonal Allergies)

Best Food for Hay Fever (Seasonal Allergies)
4.71 (94.25%) 73 votes

A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study of a 5-cents-a-day food for ragweed allergy sufferers.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

“[A] great deal is asked of [our] immune system. On one hand, it has “to respond rapidly and violently to invaders, but at the same time limits both the…response and the collateral damage to the host.” Anaphylactic shock, like when someone with a peanut allergy drops dead after eating a peanut, is an example of an overactive immune response. The flipside is an underactive immune response, which can put you at risk for infection.

If you suffer some severe trauma, for example, it’s not enough to get to a level 1 trauma center. Death related to sepsis, blood infection, is still a major problem. And, a major factor is the depression of our immune system caused by the stress of the trauma. So, what these researchers did was try to stimulate immune function in trauma victims by injecting them with beta glucan, a type of fiber found in yeast—mostly car crash victims, but also gunshots and stab wounds. And, not only did the beta-glucan group suffer less sepsis overall, they had five times fewer complications, and no deaths—compared to nearly one in three dying in the control group.

I’ve talked about the role of oral beta glucans in the form of nutritional yeast to boost immune function in adults and children. But if it’s so immunostimulatory, then might it increase inflammation, worsen allergies? Actually, dietary yeast may offer the best of both worlds, possessing both anti-inflammatory as well as antimicrobial activities. On one hand, activating the immune system to prevent infections; “on the other hand,…capable of reducing…inflammatory reaction…” Given their best-of-both-worlds nature, enhancing immune defense while “simultaneously down-regulat[ing] inflammations, beta…glucan[s are suggested as a replacement] for immunosuppres[ant] drugs to treat inflammatory diseases,” like inflammatory bowel disease. Turns out that’s a bad idea for Crohn’s disease, since it can make things worse. Same with another disease called hidradenitis suppurativa. But what about allergies, like hay fever?

They did a “nasal provocation test” with tree pollen, and then siphoned off some mucus, and those that had been taking beta glucans had lower levels of some inflammatory compounds (or should I say inphlegmatory compounds). And, based just on that, they suggested it might help people with hay fever. But you don’t know—until you put it to the test.

A “randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study compared the effects of daily supplementation” for a month with about a teaspoon of nutritional yeast worth of beta glucans versus placebo on the “physical and psychological health…of self-described ‘moderate’ ragweed allergy sufferers.” The ragweed family is one of the leading causes of hay fever. Give people a placebo and nothing much happens. But, in the beta-glucan group, a significant drop in symptoms and symptom severity. Fewer runny noses, fewer itchy eyes, and fewer sleep problems. So, no wonder: less tension, depression, anger, fatigue, and confusion, and more vigor. So, improved allergy symptoms, overall physical health, and emotional well-being with the beta glucans found in a single teaspoon of nutritional yeast, which would cost about five cents a day.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: meineresterampe via Pixabay. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

“[A] great deal is asked of [our] immune system. On one hand, it has “to respond rapidly and violently to invaders, but at the same time limits both the…response and the collateral damage to the host.” Anaphylactic shock, like when someone with a peanut allergy drops dead after eating a peanut, is an example of an overactive immune response. The flipside is an underactive immune response, which can put you at risk for infection.

If you suffer some severe trauma, for example, it’s not enough to get to a level 1 trauma center. Death related to sepsis, blood infection, is still a major problem. And, a major factor is the depression of our immune system caused by the stress of the trauma. So, what these researchers did was try to stimulate immune function in trauma victims by injecting them with beta glucan, a type of fiber found in yeast—mostly car crash victims, but also gunshots and stab wounds. And, not only did the beta-glucan group suffer less sepsis overall, they had five times fewer complications, and no deaths—compared to nearly one in three dying in the control group.

I’ve talked about the role of oral beta glucans in the form of nutritional yeast to boost immune function in adults and children. But if it’s so immunostimulatory, then might it increase inflammation, worsen allergies? Actually, dietary yeast may offer the best of both worlds, possessing both anti-inflammatory as well as antimicrobial activities. On one hand, activating the immune system to prevent infections; “on the other hand,…capable of reducing…inflammatory reaction…” Given their best-of-both-worlds nature, enhancing immune defense while “simultaneously down-regulat[ing] inflammations, beta…glucan[s are suggested as a replacement] for immunosuppres[ant] drugs to treat inflammatory diseases,” like inflammatory bowel disease. Turns out that’s a bad idea for Crohn’s disease, since it can make things worse. Same with another disease called hidradenitis suppurativa. But what about allergies, like hay fever?

They did a “nasal provocation test” with tree pollen, and then siphoned off some mucus, and those that had been taking beta glucans had lower levels of some inflammatory compounds (or should I say inphlegmatory compounds). And, based just on that, they suggested it might help people with hay fever. But you don’t know—until you put it to the test.

A “randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study compared the effects of daily supplementation” for a month with about a teaspoon of nutritional yeast worth of beta glucans versus placebo on the “physical and psychological health…of self-described ‘moderate’ ragweed allergy sufferers.” The ragweed family is one of the leading causes of hay fever. Give people a placebo and nothing much happens. But, in the beta-glucan group, a significant drop in symptoms and symptom severity. Fewer runny noses, fewer itchy eyes, and fewer sleep problems. So, no wonder: less tension, depression, anger, fatigue, and confusion, and more vigor. So, improved allergy symptoms, overall physical health, and emotional well-being with the beta glucans found in a single teaspoon of nutritional yeast, which would cost about five cents a day.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: meineresterampe via Pixabay. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video.

103 responses to “Best Food for Hay Fever (Seasonal Allergies)

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  1. Very good to know. I don’t have any allergies but I have several friends who might benefit. I wonder if they went on a whole food plant-based diet would that relieve their symptoms?




    10
    1. On the extremely limited basis of my own experience, the answer is no. I have tree-pollen allergies, I’ve followed the McDougall starch-based diet for the last 2 years, but have noticed no change in my allergic reaction.

      That said, Dr. McDougall himself says a good diet *may* help:

      “Even allergic problems that on first impression seem to be due to agents other than those present in foods (pollens, for instance) can often be helped by a change in diet. The immune system has a limited capacity to handle allergens from many sources. If your immune system is overwhelmed and you can lighten its burden in any way (for example, by eliminating all dairy products), then you will be helped to tolerate the pollen grains swirling about you from the tree outside your bedroom window.”
      https://www.drmcdougall.com/health/education/health-science/common-health-problems/allergic-reactions-to-food/




      1
      1. I’ve had severe tree-pollen allergies all my life until I switched to WFPB diet. After one year, my allergies were completely gone!




        14
    2. Many plants have been found to have qualities that lessen allergy symptoms, so I would say that most likely yes, they would probably see improvements. I was constantly congested prior to going vegan and even just going vegan before adapting to a WFPB diet, my congestion disappeared! I’m not sure why I was always congested, it may have been due to allergies I’m honestly not sure, but I haven’t had that perpetual congestion since.




      2
      1. I have been on wfpb diet for nearly 5 yrs and have not experienced any lessening in seasonal allergies. I seem to be aquiring more allergies, but I do not attribute this to diet.. more to age and circumstance maybe. Overall health improved greatly.. just not the allergies.




        5
    3. I think it is your-mileage-may-vary scenario. we came to a WFPB diet because my husband and I developed allergies to eggs and dairy. Its been a year: both our spring allergies gretly diminished ( just the occasional sneeze, mild eye itch when windy) and my asthma completely gone. I think for me cutting out diary made a huge difference.




      1
      1. That’s great to hear! Agree that allergy results with this dietary change may vary. But to paraphrase Dr Greger: with a safe, inexpensive, dietary change to eating whole fruits, whole grains, whole vegetables, and beans, that is proven to regress atherosclerosis/heart disease, the number one killer of Americans, why not eat a plant-based diet and see what other health benefits occur? Dairy and eggs contain prominent allergens, so ditching them in those with asthma and allergies makes sense as a first-line intervention.

        -Dr Anderson, Health Support Volunteer




        1
  2. Also, in the past I believe you’ve mentioned seaweed and miso as being effective. Have there been studies on these two as well? Thank you!




    3
  3. Meh. I’ve eaten nutritional yeast (3 Tbs/day approximately) for years and it did nothing at all for my pollen allergies. Overall diet change helped tremendously. When there’s a big “bloom” I use NasalCrom




    5
  4. I did a search on Wellmune WFP and saw wide variety of supplements. Is that what you’re talking about or is my nutrional yeast I put in some of my food dishes just as good?




    0
    1. Dr. Greger recommends using nutritional yeast, he generally advocates food over supplements. There is also very poor regulation in the supplement industry and often times supplements don’t contain what they’re selling at all or very small amounts or even much higher amounts than labeled.




      10
  5. Beta glucan is also found in oats, is it not? How much oatmeal would give the same effect? I found that my allergies have improved somewhat since I’ve added oats to my daily regimen. Of course I’m also a big fan of nutritional yeast, but I don’t eat it every day.




    8
    1. Based on what I briefly remember in conversations under other yeast beta glucan videos here, the beta hlucans studied are specific to yeast. Oat beta glucans may not have the same effect.




      2
    1. Carl, I can’t answer your question, but can tell you that you definitely want to deactivate the yeast through heat. We should not consume live and active yeast. Nutritional yeast is an inactive yeast.




      5
      1. According to https://www.livestrong.com/article/418496-what-is-the-difference-between-brewers-yeast-bakers-yeast/

        “brewer’s yeast and baker’s yeast both turn sugars into alcohol and carbon dioxide. Both of these yeasts are made from strains of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae fungus, but each from different strains of this species.”

        So they are very closely related, so closely that the can interbreed. It is like the difference between a German shepard dog and a French Poodle, or the difference between a boxer dog and a collie. As a child i had a boxer/collie mix. A delightful dog. The strains are different, their human provided food is different and their death is different: in the oven for bakers yeast, in the factory for nutritional yeast. My guess is that the nutritional aspects are quite close although the taste is more palatable to the normal human taste because of their food and that the main difference is if they are alive or not when they are eaten. But i would like to hear from an expert or someone who has researched this, So i don’t have to.




        1
  6. Aren’t mushrooms a good source of beta glucans? I don’t like the artificial folic acid added to all the brands of nutritional yeast available at local health food stores, so I stopped using it.




    4
    1. Dr. Greger doesn’t recommend specific brands in his talks, because his work is entirely non-commercial, but I can tell you that you can purchase nutritional yeast online with no added vitamins, and have it shipped to your house. For example, Foods Alive brand nutritional yeast flakes, and Sari brand nutritional yeast–no additives at all. Good luck!




      6
      1. Yes,
        I was going to mention the same, I could not tolerate nor did I like fortified Nutritional Yeast. I recently bought and tried Foods Alive and thought it was great ! I can’t take synthetic B vitamins, they make me ill, only in whole food form vitamins or from diet.




        1
    2. Yes, and Dr. Greger has made many videos about the benefits of mushrooms over the years. He is definitely in the “eat mushrooms” camp. Remember to eat outside your kingdom. Joel Fuhrman and many, many others also really value mushrooms for anti-cancer, health , and longevity benefits. Besides, they taste good.
      John S
      PDX OR




      3
    3. I have a friend in the commercial popcorn business and one of their flavors contains nutritional yeast. She is aware of the downsides of synthetic folic acid and asked the manufacturer about the folic acid content and was told, they do not add folic acid to the yeast culture, it was naturally occuring folates. so just a sloppy labeling job, but not sure if I trust that explanation.




      0
  7. In other videos and writings regarding nutritional yeast, Dr. G has said that bread yeast is pretty much the same thing. The question is, if a person regularly eats a significant amount of bread made with yeast, does that provide the benefits attributed to nutritional yeast so that eating nutritional yeast in addition is not worth the effort? Does anyone know how much yeast is in bread, seeing as it grows during the rising stage and presumably becomes more than the amount in the recipe?




    1
    1. You might check out Vitacost.com for Foods Alive Nutritional Yeast, it’s only $8.99. They ship for free when you spend $49. I just save up things I need to make the free shipping.




      1
  8. Just curious, I didn’t understand : how much beta glucan is there in nutritional yeast ? It’s completely new to me, I always thought that only oats and barley were reliable sources of beta glucan fiber…and for instance, how can I get the 3 grams per day of beta glucan suggested by the US FDA (for example, with a mix of yeast, barley or oat meal) ?




    2
    1. It’s my understanding that while the beta glucan in oats, for example, is very beneficial, it differs from the beta glucan in yeast so it may not or likely does not do the same things as studies find from yeast beta glucans.




      2
    2. Here are some articles on how much beta glucans is in certain foods, including nutritional yeast. http://healthyeating.sfgate.com/foods-rich-beta-glucan-10426.html Foods Rich in Beta Glucan
      http://healthyeating.sfgate.com/foods-rich-beta-glucan-10426.html Foods Rich in Beta Glucan http://www.todaysdietitian.com/newarchives/050114p16.shtml Bet
      https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/mnfr.201300338
      Effects of orally administered yeast-derived beta-glucans: a review.
      In the one study cited using beta glucans to treat cancer, the dose of nutritional yeast used was just 1/16 of a teaspoon.




      3
  9. Good timing Dr Gregor! I’m recovering from trauma and will add ( unfortified) nutritional yeast to my diet to aid in reducing inflammation.




    2
  10. So if the unfortified nutritional yeast is too expensive (big family- we eat a lot!) is it worth eating the fortified kind for the health benefits? Or does that negate any benefits because of the folic acid?




    1
    1. Dr. Greger doesn’t seem to have a problem with the fortified stuff. The B12 is actually beneficial I just wish they’d leave out the folic acid.
      Sari is the only truly unfortified one I know of, it’s only a couple bucks price difference (when it’s on sale but it always seems to be) from Bragg’s for example, but I know that a couple or few bucks can make a big difference… I wish they’d sell in bulk!
      Other “unfortified” that I know of is Kal’s but they’re blatant liars because they do add folic acid but add it in a way where they can claim it’s unfortified… I was super dissapointed to learn that.

      Anyways, it would be really cool to hear Dr. Greger’s exact thoughts on the folic acid in fortified versions.




      2
  11. If only it cost 5 cents a day to eat a couple tablespoons. Love this stuff… can’t go back to the fortified kinds though, Sari is just so much better. Maybe prices will lower if it becomes more common. Not that the unfortified is much more expensive but I can’t afford to eat s much as I want all the time.




    1
  12. Nutritional yeast is a common migrane trigger. Less than an 1/8th of a teaspoon will trigger a headache in me. In researching why, it looks like nutritional yeast has a similar chemical makeup to MSG, a well known migrane trigger.

    “For those of us that didn’t know, our beloved nutritional yeast has the same chemical compound as MSG, or monosodium glutamate. There is no chemical difference between the natural occurring glutamate ions in nutritional yeast and the glutamate ions present in MSG. They are both treated exactly the same by our bodies.” https://www.livekindly.co/nutritional-yeast-and-the-msg-myth/




    1
    1. Julie, it might trigger migraines in you but I’ve never heard of this being an issue for others. MSG the food additive is VERY different than foods that naturally contain glutamic acid which many healthy foods do such as tomatoes, mushrooms, and many other whole plant foods as well as animal “foods.”
      MSG is a synthetic food additive and doesn’t naturally occur in foods. It reacts very differently than naturally occurring glutamic acid.




      3
      1. Also, I was unable to find that quote in the article you linked… which is good because it’s inaccurate. The synthetic food additive MSG reacts very differently in the body than glutamic acid found in a large variety of many whole foods. Mercola had a good article on his website explaining the difference and why they react differently, not that I’m a fan of his in the least! But occasionally he does have something on his site that isn’t ridiculous… not enough to justify visiting his site though.




        1
        1. Hi S: The quote is in the red box (1/3 down the page) showing the chemical structure of glutamate and monosodium glutamate.
          Nutritional yeast does cause migranes in some people–just thought I’d put it out there for those who may be sensitive.

          “Commonly reported migraine triggers include alcohol (especially red wine and beer), chocolate, aged cheese, cured meats, smoked fish, yeast extract, food preservatives that contain nitrates and nitrites, artificial sweeteners, and monosodium glutamate (MSG).” https://americanmigrainefoundation.org/understanding-migraine/migraine-and-diet/




          1
          1. Interesting article BUT…. many years ago after eating a Chinese meal, my mother and I looked at each other and shared a common symptom–the feeling that our heads were being pressed inward from the sides. We always assumed it was the MSG. Yes, this is anecdotal, and yes, it could be something else we ate that caused it….




            0
  13. Interesting but far from conclusive…

    From the Text of the Study:

    “One limitation of our study is the small study population. Additional studies including more study participants should be conducted. Furthermore, ragweed pollen levels were not measured during the study. In addition, there was inadequate characterization of the ragweed allergy status of study participants. Our study involved participants who were self-described allergy sufferers and had not received a clinical diagnosis of ragweed allergy.”




    1
  14. I know I’m only a study of one and folks are tired of hearing this one, but the very short story is this: from a childhood through my teens to nearly 20, I was plagued by sinus problems and headaches had been to various doctors, had tests-including EEG, and prescription drugs. No real relief and I’d wind up treated with antibiotics for sinus infection at least once or twice per year. (Also had migraines, but is unrelated-and they went away with WFPB.)

    Then it all went away “magically” in my early twenties. Never knew why until I was reading The China Study some years ago and learned about human digestive/nutritional issues with moocow milk (MM). Then it came clear to me–I had stopped daily drinking of MM when I left home and all the MM ruined in the fridge before it was consumed, so I had quit buying/drinking it. NO doctor had ever even hinted at the idea that diet could be related to my issues (was the 70’s-80’s)

    And if I eat ice-cream even today, I’ll get stuffy. I have absolutely no desire to consume dairy in any form any more-but some cheese here and there in small amounts. Also cheese does not cause the same response. And yes I’ve drunk store and raw milk, it all stuffs me up and that’s fine, I don’t miss it.

    I share this all the time because so many suffer so much from “allergies” and “sinus” and they are consuming milk in one form or another. Hope that helps someone somewhere, or at least get them to thinking about the connection between food and health.

    I walked far enough through pollen-laden fields yesterday that my ankles were yellow (and my dog). But I never sneezed once. (nor did he). It’s just a non-issue anymore and my childhood could have been a good bit different had I not be raised on MM.




    7
    1. Wade, thanks for sharing your story. I had a list of problems – from dysmenorrhea to sinus issues – caused by my heavy consumption of dairy (MM) products over the years. They all cleared up when I finally eliminated dairy from my diet. Back when I had all the problems, I couldn’t imagine living without dairy products. Now I wouldn’t consume them again for anything. Just the other day, I was dishing out some ice cream for my mother & inadvertently licked a tiny bit off one of my fingers. Just that teeny tiny little dab coated enough of my mouth to make me want throw up. I had to rinse my mouth out with green tea to get rid of the taste. It was disgusting. I can’t believe I ever ate that stuff & would never go back to it for anything.




      1
  15. I had severe seasonal hay-fever which lead to asthma. I needed to take several medications, the strongest over the counter antihistamine I could buy, a nasal spray, eye drops and asthma spray and still the spring was a nightmare. I went on a gluten free diet and most of the symptoms resolved, with very rare use of medication required. Then I went plant based and all of the symptoms resolved, no drugs and no hay-fever symptoms and no asthma. Wish I knew this 50 years ago.




    2
  16. Hello

    I think the website and info and book are all great. But as a Brit, sometimes the American language can confuse me a bit. Can someone help me out please? Is the Nutritional / Dietery Yeast that is talked about in this article the same thing as Brewers Yeast? Brewers yeast I can find available easily, Nutritional yeast not so. Comments please.




    2
    1. Ted, you should hopefully be able to find nutritional yeast online. My favorite is Sari brand, I prefer the unfortified stuff. Hers’a link to their website but you can also get through Amazon: https://sarifoods.co/products/nutritional-yeast-flakes
      I used to use Bragg’s nutritional yeast. I’ve also used Kal’s, but note that their “unfortified” isn’t really unfortified. Red Star is another popular brand.




      0
    2. Nutritional yeast is available in some health food shops in the UK and some branches of Holland & Barrett, as well as online. It tends to be the Marigold Engevita brand. Hope that helps.




      0
        1. Marmite is not the nutritional yeast that Dr Gregory is talking about in this video. The thing you’re looking for will be called ‘nutritional yeast’ or ‘yeast flakes’. It has the appearance of small yellow flakes and looks a bit like fish food. It is available with added B12 (https://www.hollandandbarrett.com/shop/product/engevita-yeast-flakes-b12-60009142), or without (https://www.ethicalsuperstore.com/products/marigold/engevita—nutritional-yeast-flakes—125g/).




          0
  17. I have suffered from allergies almost my entire life. I’m 42 now…went vegan about 5 years ago then whole-foods, plant-based about 6 months ago. (it is amazing how our taste buds adapt to food without sugar, salt and oil!) My allergies are still SO BAD some days that I want to die! ha! I live with cats and dogs and most days I’m fine, but some days not. I don’t get it, but I love nutritional yeast and will start eating at least a teaspoon a day now to minimize the symptoms.
    The only time in my life where I went for months (maybe even a couple years) without allergies was after moving to another country. My allergies were horrible in San Diego, California and then moved to Costa Rica and was suddenly allergy free…but eventually came back.

    Thank you for this video!




    2
    1. I don’t want to sound facetious but have you tried wearing an N95 or surgical mask when you leave the house?

      There are many Koreans, Chinese and Japanese where I live and a small but significant proportion do wear masks outside. Whether this is for pollution/dust control, allergy relief or respiratory infection control I don’t know. However, a mask can apparently reduce allergy symptoms There are also nasal filters that you can buy which are more discreet than masks.




      2
      1. How much do these block air flow and hinder breathing? Does anyone know? I like to run outside and have to constantly blow my nose….




        0
    2. I have had the same experience…I’ve been vegan for about 10 years now but it does not help my allergies one bit, seems to be getting worse with age. One thing that might be worth into looking for anyone suffering, if you’re somewhere you can get them, is SLIT (allergy drops–same approach as allergy shots but you just get them every few months and take them at home). It’s natural and makes sense, small exposure over time to stop your body from reacting. I did it for about 1 year and it did help dramatically after just a few months–was great. But then I moved and wanted to continue but it is ridiculously hard to get those where I am now (New Zealand, land of the year-round allergies, I have discovered). Seems like a way to really fix the problem instead of just treating symptoms which for those of us who get bad allergies.




      1
    3. Your symptoms are similar to mine. I get temporary sinus relief from ginger tea, but it’s never enough. Good luck with the yeast.




      0
  18. I had the same experience. Suffered from sinus and blocked nose from all my life then went plant based at 68 eight years ago and it all went away very quickly.




    5
  19. Hello, I am confused on the amount of nutritional yeast one should take daily. I have read one teaspoon to a couple of tablespoons. I suppose either one tsp is not enough or 2 tbs is too much. Would someone clarify?




    0
  20. I’ve read online that nutritional yeast might be related to an increase in IGF-1 . Can someone comment? Is this true?




    0
    1. Oh Y oh YGG? I’ve worked hard to find actual scientific references to this internet rumor and cannot find a single study addressing it! I’ve looked in PubMed and Google Scholar, and the wider internet. All I can find are discussions about people who’ve heard this. If you have a site that mentions a published journal article on this and want to send it on, I’ll pull the article and review it for you. Sorry I couldn’t crack this one…. -Dr Anderson, Health Support Volunteer




      0
  21. I tried the WFPB diet for 4 months and it did nothing for my allergies and headaches/migraines. I actually felt sick and lethargic all the time. I have also suffered from IBS-D my whole life. I stopped eating meat and dairy for many years and still no change. I switched to the Paleo diet 2 months ago and I have not had any issues with any type of headache or IBS since. It was the gluten and the grains that were making my life miserable. Now I eat small amounts of red lean meat, fish, and chicken and more greens than fruits. I also have more energy and feel more positive about life. Paleo just seems to agree better with me than the strict WFPB diet. Age 54.




    0
    1. Because you probably ate a significant amount of gluten on your WFPB diet, after reading you mentioned IBS problems during your whole life, i instantly thought about gluten/dairy which everyone with any IBS digestive problems(crohn, colitis etc) should drastically limit or best stop them completely, gluten is possibly even far worse than dairy for peoples with any IBS problems but a paleo diet normally exclude boths(and refined grains) which is a great point.




      0
  22. Does anyone have recommendations for those who are seriously underweight on a whole foods, plant based diet? I need some ideas for calorically dense foods other that avocados and nuts that are easy to prepare for someone who is recovering from a serious illness.




    0
    1. I’d say extra virgin raw oilve oil even if thats not a whole food at all, it add easy extra calories and is not that bad~




      0
        1. Well from my understanding, this kind of oils are almost empy of nutrients/fibers/water/protein/carbs but kinda neutral on health as long as you dont drink tons of spoons of it but few extra hundreds of kilocalories should help with weight gain or not losing more, one tablespoon of oil contains about 130kcal, i guess extra virgin raw canola oil could be a decent option to get extra omega 3 and more neutral taste if prefered~




          0
    2. Hi, Donna! Besides avocados and nuts like you mentioned, seeds, starchy vegetables, and whole grains are great healthy calorically dense whole foods. Teff in particular is quite hearty. Including snacks in between meals can also help increase caloric intake and therefore can assist in weight gain as well.




      0
      1. Thank you! It’s unusual today to have people who need to gain weight, and of course we want to do that in the healthiest way possible.




        1
  23. Peoples with resistant similar allergies problems who are not doing much better on a WFPD diet should try removing completely gluten for at least a month and better all grains(various type of potatoes are much better,tastier and healthier anyways), if it still doesnt seems to help significantly, think about doing a total rest water fasting for at least a week to clean your body much deeper and then eat a WFPB diet with or without grains/gluten based on tolerance and symptoms which should help very much if it didnt reverse it completely~




    0
  24. I think my question was overlooked. I would like to know the recommended amount of nutritional yeast one should take daily. I have read people say they take half a teaspoon and others a couple of tablespoons. I would like to add nutritional yeast to our diet but have no idea how much to take. Would someone clarify? I am healthy but I think it is a good idea to boost the immune system. My husband has sinus allergy, which comes out of the blue. Sometimes, he takes Allegra but I would prefer a healthier option. Any suggestions for him besides nutritional yeast?




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    1. Hi Carolina, Hssi,

      I am a volunteer for Dr. Greger. Thank you so much for your question.

      In this video, Dr. Greger mentioned that in the study he’s looking at, which improves allergy symptoms from hay fever allergies, that you should consume 1 tsp per day. In another video (found here: https://nutritionfacts.org/?fwp_search=best+food+to+counter+stress-induced+&fwp_content_type=video) Dr. Greger suggests that an appropriate amount to prevent the common cold would be 2 tsp per day, as a 1/2 tsp didn’t seem to help. So somewhere between 1 to 2 tsp per day would probably be the recommended range.

      I hope that helps answer your question!




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  25. So should we cut back on nutritional wheat due to the possible increase in IGF-1? How much will increase IGF-1? I think Jeff Novack doesn’t eat nutritional yeast for this reason.




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  26. I think this is a useful video and have no issue with it, but I have a big issue with the headline, characteristic of many recent headlines.

    In this case the headline is “Best Food for Hay Fever.” The video refers to a test against a placebo. There is no comparison with any other foods.

    Don’t get me wrong. Nutritional yeast may very well be the best food to fight hay fever. It also may not. To steal a line, we can’t tell unless we put it to the test. A test against a placebo can show it beats a placebo, not that it beats every other food so that we can call it the best food against hay fever. That makes people that claim the paleo diet is the best diet in the world look credible by comparison-at least they compared the paleo diet against several other diets (not wfpb.) Here the “best food” is given no comparison with other food at all.

    Great video-but misleading headline.




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    1. Hi Tyhee, thanks for your comment. It is great that you follow Dr Greger videos with such details. Perhaps we can say one of the best food for Hay fever. But the reasoning I think goes to the fact that the richness of nutritional yeast in its B vitamin contents and Nutritional yeast provides the compounds beta-1,3 gluten, trehalose, mannan and glutathione, which are associated with enhanced immunity.




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  27. What is the best way to get the nutritional yeast in? I put it in my oatmeal with the flaxseed,chia seed, blueberries, raspberries strawberries blackberries, cranberries, banana and walnuts and it did not taste that good.




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    1. Nutritional yeast is great on salads, in salad dressing, on pasta, on a baked potato in soup or on anything that would go good with a slightly cheesy flavor.




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  28. I have had extreme problems with allergies all my life, the only thing that I have found makes a significant impact on them is the Wim Hof breathing Techinique, I have no empirical evidence but I personally have gone from getting extreme hayfever symptoms 2-3 days of the week sometimes, to never getting them and the odd very mildly runny nose, it only comes back when I forget to do my breathing exercises multiple days in a row. Such an improvement, allergies were such a pain in my ass, I think I saw some improvement changing to a plant based diet, but it wasn’t a magic fix the way the breathing exercises have been. I generally do them the moment after I wake up, and I find they have all kind of other benefits like decreasing muscle soreness and much more. Definitely worth trying for anyone who has struggled with them like I have.

    If your interested Wim Hof has feature multiple times on the Joe Rogan podcast, Rich roll podcast, Tim Ferriss and probably more.




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    1. Interesting, I struggle with bad allergies now so will gladly try this breathing technique. Also, I have been doing the nutritional yeast daily since this article came out–so probably 12 days now. I think it has reduced my symptoms maybe by half, which is definitely a start…wonder if it is cumulative? I am taking less than half the herbs I normally do to control symptoms (stinging nettle and butterbur). That’s definitely a good thing. Anyone else try this yet….any luck?




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