How Risky is the Arsenic in Rice?

How Risky is the Arsenic in Rice?
4.66 (93.13%) 64 votes

Getting rice down to the so-called safe water limit for arsenic would still allow for roughly 500 times greater cancer risk than is normally considered acceptable.

Discuss
Republish

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Given the level of arsenic in rice, how could we figure out how much rice is too much? “There are no [U.S.] standards for arsenic in [rice, even though that’s our] main source of exposure. But, look, there’s limits on arsenic in apple juice and tap water. So, to calculate those, they must have sat down and figured out how much arsenic a day was too much—too risky—and then figured people drink, what, four to eight cups of water a day, and set the limit that way, right? Okay, well can’t we just use their how-much-arsenic-a-day-is-too-much-arsenic-a-day number, and based on the average arsenic content in rice, figure out how-much-rice-a-day-is-too-much-rice?

Well, “[t]he allowable level established by the FDA for arsenic in bottled water [for example] is 10 [parts per billion].” Assuming people might drink a liter a day, okay. So, based on that 10-a-day limit, how much rice is that?

Well, “[e]ach 1 g increase in rice intake was associated with a 1% increase in…total arsenic [in the urine], such that eating [a little over a half a cup] of cooked rice [could be] comparable [to] drinking [a liter of that maximally contaminated water].” Well, if you can eat a half-cup a day, why does Consumer Reports suggest just a few servings a week? You could eat nearly a serving every day, and still stay within the daily arsenic limits set for drinking water.

Well, Consumer Reports felt the 10 parts per billion water standard was too lax, and so, went with “the most protective standard” in the world—found in New Jersey. Isn’t that cool? Good for New Jersey! Okay. So, if you use 5 instead of 10, you can see how they got down to their only-a-few-servings-of-rice-a-week recommendation. Presumably, that’s based on average arsenic levels in rice.

So, if you choose a lower-arsenic rice, with only half the level, can you have four servings a week, instead of two? And, if you boil rice like pasta, doesn’t that cut levels in half, too?  So, then you’re up to like eight servings a week. So, based on the water standard, you could still apparently safely eat a serving of rice a day, if you choose the right rice, and cooked it right.  And, I would assume the water limit is ultra-conservative, right? I mean, since people are expected to drink water every day of their lives, whereas most people don’t eat rice every day, seven days a week. I assumed that, but I was wrong. It turns out the opposite is true.

See, all this time I was assuming the current drinking guideline exposure would be safe, which in carcinogen terms, is usually “1 in a million,” as I mentioned before. That’s how we typically regulate cancer-causing substances. Some chemical company wants to release some new chemical; we want them to show us that it doesn’t cause more than “1 in a million” excess cancer cases. Of course, we have 300 million people in this country, and so, that doesn’t make the 300 extra families who have to deal with cancer feel any better, but that’s just the kind of agreed-upon acceptable risk.

The problem is, according to the National Research Council, with “the current [federal] drinking water standard for arsenic of 10,” we’re not talking an “excess cancer risk” of one in a million people, but as high as “1 case in 300 people.” What? My 300 extra cases of cancer just turned into a million more cases? A million more families dealing with a cancer diagnosis? “This is 3000 times higher than a commonly accepted cancer risk for an environmental carcinogen of 1 in [a million].” “[I]f we were to use the normally accepted” 1 in a million odds of cancer risk, the water standard would have to be like 500 times lower—.02 instead of 10. Even the New Jersey standard is 250 times too high. That’s a “rather drastic” difference, but “underlines how little precaution is instilled in the current guidelines.”

Okay; so, wait. Why isn’t the water standard .02 instead? Because that “would be nearly impossible.” We just don’t have the technology to really get arsenic levels in the water that low. The technologically feasible level has been estimated at 3. Okay. So, why is the limit 10, and not 3? The decision to use a threshold of “10 instead of 3 is…mainly a budgetary decision.” Otherwise, it would cost a lot of money.

So, the current water quote-unquote “safety” limit is “more motivated by politics than by technology.” Nobody wants to be told they have toxic tap water. If so, they might demand better water treatment, and that could get expensive. “As a result, many people drink water at levels very close to the current [legal] guideline,…not aware that they are exposed to an increased risk of cancer.” “Even worse,” millions of Americans drink water exceeding the legal limit: all these little red triangles. But, even the people living in areas that meet the legal limit must understand that the “current arsenic guidelines are only marginally protective.”

Maybe we should tell people that drink water, i.e., everyone, that the “current arsenic regulations are [really just] a cost-benefit compromise, and that, based on usual health risk [models], the standards should be much lower.” People must be made aware that the “targets…should really be as close to zero as possible,” and that when it comes to water, at least, we should aim for the reachable 3 limit. Okay, but bottom line: what does this mean for rice?

Well, first of all, so much for just trying to get rice down to the so-called safe water limit, since that already way exceeds standard carcinogen risks, and is more based on feasibility and cost-benefit compromises, allowing “for roughly a 500 times higher risk of cancer than is normally considered acceptable.” So, “while authorities ponder when and how they will regulate arsenic concentration[s] in rice,” maybe we “should…curtail or strongly limit our consumption of rice.”

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Icons created by Made by Made and Linseed Studio from The Noun Project.

Image credit: Wenchieh Yang via Flickr. Image has been modified.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Given the level of arsenic in rice, how could we figure out how much rice is too much? “There are no [U.S.] standards for arsenic in [rice, even though that’s our] main source of exposure. But, look, there’s limits on arsenic in apple juice and tap water. So, to calculate those, they must have sat down and figured out how much arsenic a day was too much—too risky—and then figured people drink, what, four to eight cups of water a day, and set the limit that way, right? Okay, well can’t we just use their how-much-arsenic-a-day-is-too-much-arsenic-a-day number, and based on the average arsenic content in rice, figure out how-much-rice-a-day-is-too-much-rice?

Well, “[t]he allowable level established by the FDA for arsenic in bottled water [for example] is 10 [parts per billion].” Assuming people might drink a liter a day, okay. So, based on that 10-a-day limit, how much rice is that?

Well, “[e]ach 1 g increase in rice intake was associated with a 1% increase in…total arsenic [in the urine], such that eating [a little over a half a cup] of cooked rice [could be] comparable [to] drinking [a liter of that maximally contaminated water].” Well, if you can eat a half-cup a day, why does Consumer Reports suggest just a few servings a week? You could eat nearly a serving every day, and still stay within the daily arsenic limits set for drinking water.

Well, Consumer Reports felt the 10 parts per billion water standard was too lax, and so, went with “the most protective standard” in the world—found in New Jersey. Isn’t that cool? Good for New Jersey! Okay. So, if you use 5 instead of 10, you can see how they got down to their only-a-few-servings-of-rice-a-week recommendation. Presumably, that’s based on average arsenic levels in rice.

So, if you choose a lower-arsenic rice, with only half the level, can you have four servings a week, instead of two? And, if you boil rice like pasta, doesn’t that cut levels in half, too?  So, then you’re up to like eight servings a week. So, based on the water standard, you could still apparently safely eat a serving of rice a day, if you choose the right rice, and cooked it right.  And, I would assume the water limit is ultra-conservative, right? I mean, since people are expected to drink water every day of their lives, whereas most people don’t eat rice every day, seven days a week. I assumed that, but I was wrong. It turns out the opposite is true.

See, all this time I was assuming the current drinking guideline exposure would be safe, which in carcinogen terms, is usually “1 in a million,” as I mentioned before. That’s how we typically regulate cancer-causing substances. Some chemical company wants to release some new chemical; we want them to show us that it doesn’t cause more than “1 in a million” excess cancer cases. Of course, we have 300 million people in this country, and so, that doesn’t make the 300 extra families who have to deal with cancer feel any better, but that’s just the kind of agreed-upon acceptable risk.

The problem is, according to the National Research Council, with “the current [federal] drinking water standard for arsenic of 10,” we’re not talking an “excess cancer risk” of one in a million people, but as high as “1 case in 300 people.” What? My 300 extra cases of cancer just turned into a million more cases? A million more families dealing with a cancer diagnosis? “This is 3000 times higher than a commonly accepted cancer risk for an environmental carcinogen of 1 in [a million].” “[I]f we were to use the normally accepted” 1 in a million odds of cancer risk, the water standard would have to be like 500 times lower—.02 instead of 10. Even the New Jersey standard is 250 times too high. That’s a “rather drastic” difference, but “underlines how little precaution is instilled in the current guidelines.”

Okay; so, wait. Why isn’t the water standard .02 instead? Because that “would be nearly impossible.” We just don’t have the technology to really get arsenic levels in the water that low. The technologically feasible level has been estimated at 3. Okay. So, why is the limit 10, and not 3? The decision to use a threshold of “10 instead of 3 is…mainly a budgetary decision.” Otherwise, it would cost a lot of money.

So, the current water quote-unquote “safety” limit is “more motivated by politics than by technology.” Nobody wants to be told they have toxic tap water. If so, they might demand better water treatment, and that could get expensive. “As a result, many people drink water at levels very close to the current [legal] guideline,…not aware that they are exposed to an increased risk of cancer.” “Even worse,” millions of Americans drink water exceeding the legal limit: all these little red triangles. But, even the people living in areas that meet the legal limit must understand that the “current arsenic guidelines are only marginally protective.”

Maybe we should tell people that drink water, i.e., everyone, that the “current arsenic regulations are [really just] a cost-benefit compromise, and that, based on usual health risk [models], the standards should be much lower.” People must be made aware that the “targets…should really be as close to zero as possible,” and that when it comes to water, at least, we should aim for the reachable 3 limit. Okay, but bottom line: what does this mean for rice?

Well, first of all, so much for just trying to get rice down to the so-called safe water limit, since that already way exceeds standard carcinogen risks, and is more based on feasibility and cost-benefit compromises, allowing “for roughly a 500 times higher risk of cancer than is normally considered acceptable.” So, “while authorities ponder when and how they will regulate arsenic concentration[s] in rice,” maybe we “should…curtail or strongly limit our consumption of rice.”

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Icons created by Made by Made and Linseed Studio from The Noun Project.

Image credit: Wenchieh Yang via Flickr. Image has been modified.

Doctor's Note

This is really the pivotal video in this 13-part series on arsenic in the food supply. The last three are really just about how to deal practically with the repercussions:

 If you missed the first nine, watch them here:

Do you like these deeper dives, or would you rather me address a greater variety of topics? This series reminds me of the long video series I did on lead. I figure if I’m going to pull all the research together, I might as well cover all the aspects, though then there are weeks on NutritionFacts.org where it’s a one-trick pony. Like I can imagine someone who doesn’t eat rice at all thinking: enough already! What do you think?

Here’s the corresponding lead series if you’re into the deep dives:

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

173 responses to “How Risky is the Arsenic in Rice?

Commenting Etiquette

The intention of the comment section under each video and blog post is to allow all members to share their stories, questions, and feedback with others in a welcoming, engaging, and respectful environment. Off-topic comments are permitted, in hopes more experienced users may be able to point them to more relevant videos that may answer their questions. Vigorous debate of science is welcome so long as participants can disagree respectfully. Advertising products or services is not permitted.

To make NutritionFacts.org a place where people feel comfortable posting without feeling attacked, we have no tolerance for ad hominem attacks or comments that are racist, misogynist, homophobic, vulgar, or otherwise inappropriate. Please help us to foster a community of mutual respect. Enforcement of these rules is done to the best of our ability on a case-by-case basis.

  1. Hello, I checked the contact page but it said to post under a video :)

    I am not sure where I could ask this or find it.
    I’m looking for a more or less, comprehensive list or/and graphics, listing as many of the potential health risk/benefits of a given food/component of a major food group.
    Let me clear it up!

    A list of page or sheet of paper, listing for example, items like this, with graphics or without:

    Meat, red, e.g.

    Fats
    • Kinds of Fats and reason why and or how they affect health (short and sweet, no long explanations)
    Proteins
    • Kinds of Fats and reason why and or how they affect health (short and sweet, no long explanations)
    Carbohydrates
    • Not present
    Cholesterol
    • Average amount, reason…
    Fiber
    • Not present

    Something like a cheat sheet for when you have a discussion or simply want to provide information.

    I ask for this because I recently had a long discussion and was not able to make my point properly due to the lack of quick access to relevant information.
    You can tell people to watch a video but that would be the next step, people I meet need a little kickstart to spark the interest in the first place.
    This just flared up again as I had a forums discussion and posting a birds view on the topic would have made it easier I think :)

    Now, I do not ask for anyone to create this, I think it’s a lot of work, but if you have anything the like, please share!

    Thank you in advance!
    Greetings, Denis




    12



    0
    1. Unfortunately I do not have the time to do this but it certainly has occurred to me that this would be great. One problem though might be in e.g. this; red meat contains branched chain amino acids, which in tandem with saturated fats lead to insulin resistance. It also contains large amounts of methionine. Contains sulfur which is acidifying and therefore, among other things, promotes kidney disease. Oh and don’t forget the cancer promotion, IBS promotion et al. But then fish and chicken have even more than red meat

      OK, my point is that it gets extremely complex. But,,, I think it could be done. (It’ll be my first project when I win the lottery) I also think I could spend 8 hrs per day on it and when complete it would still be incomplete. So ideally it would be done with the developing results on say a web page with, of course, getting input from viewers.

      I have T1 diabetes and am frequently confronted by people “authoritatively” telling me that eating carbs causes T2 diabetes. Showing the complex relationship of dietary factors in an effective way, (i.e. accurately and understandably) that will put that nonsense to rest is something that I struggle with.

      I have worked on these things but only to the point of a one page diagram. Then factors become incredibly complex and I do have another job but the idea is still very stimulating. Perhaps many different people could contribute one single aspect of your cheat sheet, with constant review and input, . Actually this would be a tome but has the potential to be very effective pedagogically.




      13



      0
      1. One problem though might be in e.g. this; red meat contains branched chain amino acids, which in tandem with saturated fats lead to insulin resistance. It also contains large amounts of methionine. Contains sulfur which is acidifying and therefore, among other things, promotes kidney disease. Oh and don’t forget the cancer promotion, IBS promotion et al.

        Or if you want to simplify, red meat contains a sugar molecule that humans do not have. Thus, eating red meat causes us to create anti-bodies for that sugar molecule as a foreign invader, leading to constant inflammation. See the link explaining the process.




        3



        1
    2. Hi Denis
      Actually this wouldn’t be that difficult to put together. Go down your list and look under the appropriate topic above. Watch the video or read the transcript. Double check the posted articles. Absolutely great way to learn the topic well enough to have that discussion. Bravo for getting in the trenches.




      3



      0
    3. Hello Denis,
      belife me such a list is not as helpful as you are thinking at the moment… let me explain it a bit.
      On one hand I understand your longing to have some quick arguments for discussions with some one. But such a list can’t be in no way complete and so is there always issues left over. Despite such a list would not be very helpful.
      Why? In my one experiences as a registered german naturopath and a WFPBLF eater for nearly 10 years no there are two main groups of people – one, they like only to discuss about a plant based diet to find a lots of arguments not to change there omnivore habit, in this case you can rol out the whole science they still will find something not proven… so even a list would’t help you. The other group need only a little bit to change there diet, because they have already realized that there is a relation between there misscomfort (maybe they have watched or listen to some cruelty to animals or have developed a chronic disease) but they don’t know where to start and who (mostly by replacements eggs for what, milk for what, how to prepare a dish with out animal stuff) So you need also no list only tell them how you do it. ;-)
      If somebody like to know more why some food may is better then others then I recoment the sites of Mr. Greger after (!) reading the books “China Study” and (!) “Whole: Rethinking the Science of Nutrition” (both from T.Colin Champell) for a better understanding of Mr. Gregers articles. Of course there are a lots of other good books too, including “How not to die” but Mr. Champell has a good attitude to explain complicated thinks easy but correct to have some basic for understanding the rules behind the rules. ;-)
      Together with the wisdom from a lots of other books I read, it is a good basic for me to advise my patients. But still, if my patients have no interest to change there diet, not even for a periode of 4 – 6 weeks I have no chance.
      Last idea: My wife works at (or “in”?) a office and she has nearly every day such kind of discussens. Why do you eat vegan? Why do you eat no meat anymore? And so on… first she tried, like you, to tell the people why she changed here diet but she have had no success and often she came home frustrated. Now she changed her habit, if someone now she ask “why do you eat vegan?” she answer quick: “Why do you eat still meat?” In 99 % of all cases people change immediately the topic, because they have not really any interest to explain there diet (we think that 80 % of all people instinctively knows that somethink is not right with their diet…)…
      I wish you all the best on your way, stay plant based, low fat… ;-)




      3



      0
    4. Hi Denis,

      Good question. We do not have something like this, but I think you may be able to find something like what you’re looking for. PCRM.org has some resources, and there is a great list of resources on this site – http://plantbaseddietitian.com/resources – where you might find something. You could also try making your own by going to the USDA database and searching for a few comparison foods: https://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/search/list.




      0



      0
  2. I am in the middle about the deep dive series. I like the focus on complicated topics that allows us to really “dive in” to get the best information we can. On the other hand, observing the “one trick pony” for weeks at a time can get old. Thus, I am looking forward to the next topic after arsenic. Although, I feel that this topic is extremely important and I appreciate your covering it in-depth.




    4



    0
    1. When you feel that deep-dive series is taking too long, and you’d rather watch somethign else, it is a good time to review or view fresh some of the old videos:
      you can always google “dr greger whatever-your-topic-of-interest”

      Dr greger cholesterol
      Dr greger chicken
      Dr greger testosterone

      You get the idea




      4



      0
    2. The REAL ISSUE is the additive effect of all the toxics…heavy metals and otherwise…that people are exposed to on a regular basis.

      Arsenic…lead…cadmium…herbicides/pesticides/GMOs and so forth in water plus food and air….plus toys and other objects used or handled on a daily basis.

      All the other chemicals in and on various products you use…EMF exposure….air pollution.

      IF you are afraid to get out of bed in the morning…you’d better think twice…your bedding might be poisoning you. LOL.

      I’m not really being alarmist or facetious here. People also need to realize that in the US a fair % of people don’t get enough to eat and some live on the streets.

      My conclusion…don’t be like some I know and laugh the issue off…reduce exposure to various toxics where you can…use water/shower filters…try to eat “clean” food…use “natural” products when possible.

      And remember…constant stress kills……but so do the uninformed….and those interested mostly in corporate profits.




      1



      0
  3. I am a fairly new plant based eater and I must admit this video series has been pretty discouraging. Rice has been one of the ways I get my belly very full and keep myself from falling off the plant based wagon. I guess I’m feeling a little bit of the typical american reaction of what are they gonna say is gonna kill me now? I have two questions- weighed against the SAD diet is rice an acceptable risk to take till I can find other things that make me as “happy”? What other tummy filling foods would you recommend ? ( whoever answers this personal opinion is fine – I have great respect for the staff at nutrition facts and the work you do)




    31



    4
    1. Amy your point is spot on and many will have the same reaction. I would just add though that the arsenic in rice is exogenous, that is, it comes from its environment rather than part of its own chemistry. So rice grown in low arsenic areas are not going to be a problem. The problem with animal based food is endogenous, in that it comes from the inherent biochemistry of its many components. Hence pasture grown or organic might make it less bad but it is still deadly.
      I would suggest just looking for sources of rice other than southern grown on old cotton fields. Then use the pasta method of cooking.
      Best of luck.




      13



      1
      1. I don’t understand how California rice can be OK when the map shows the Central Valley covered in red – arsenic laced water. I don’t think it rains enough there for them not to irrigate.




        2



        0
        1. Wegan, interesting question. I would be interested to see how calif wines do in comparison to other parts of the country with respect to arsenic. You can download the US Food and Drug Administration Inorganic Arsenic in Rice and Rice Products analysis September 2013 report that compares calif products to other countries. https://www.fda.gov/Food/FoodborneIllnessContaminants/Metals/ucm319870.htm
          I did notice that white basmati from calif had approx half the arsenic of organic white basmati … whether due to regional differences or farming practices I do not know. http://www.cnn.com/2015/03/27/living/arsenic-wine-california-lawsuit-feat/index.html




          0



          0
    2. Hi Amy. If you like whole grains, instead of rice, I would suggest barley. I find 10 minute barley at Trader Joe’s and also 10 minute bulgur there as well. For a completely different flavor, try quinoa. It’s quick-cooking, about 15 minutes. And what about whole wheat pasta? I assume that since you were already eating rice, you’re not gluten-sensitive. One delicious food that I urge you to try with whole wheat or other whole grain pasta (though I guess not brown rice pasta at this point) is lentils. They are absolutely delicious with pasta and marinara sauce. It sort of looks like a meat sauce and the taste is phenomenal. I have found precooked lentils at Trader Joe’s though I guess you could find them elsewhere. I only buy brands where there is one ingredient: lentils. They’re precooked so all you have to do is add them to the pasta after a few minutes. They only need 4-5 minutes in boiling water to be ready to eat. I hope this helps you.




      12



      0
      1. I wonder where to buy hulled barley not pearl barley. I understand that pearl barley, which I see everywhere, is not a whole grain.




        0



        0
        1. pearl barley still is very low glycemic index. farro is a kind of hulled barley and tastes great. old red mill is a good brand. I got a box of various less common grains from jet.com but I see even Walmart has some recently




          0



          0
          1. Kevin, farro’s not a barley, though the term’s often applied to barley, but a cover term for 3 wheat species: farro medio (emmer, most commonly called farro), grande (spelt or epeautre), and piccolo (einkorn, the oldest wheat).
            I don’t think a low glycemic index (or load) is enough to make me use pearled barley if I can get unhulled or hull-less barley.




            0



            0
    3. I find beans to be considerably more filling than rice. Quinoa is my go-to “grain” -cooks in 20 minutes or less. -Best of luck to you.




      8



      0
    4. I guess I’m slow/dense, but I don’t understand what led to the thumbs-down reactions to Amy’s comment… she stated her concern (legitimate in my view) respectfully.

      Amy, to answer your question about alternatives… being raised in Louisiana, I’m experiencing a similar grieving process about needing to cut back/out my rice consumption. My first likely alternative is to eat more barley. Barley isn’t the same, but I find it a bit lighter than wheat berries and I’ve always just liked barley. Bulgur wheat is even less like rice, but I recently discovered that #1-sized bulgur is indistinguishable from cous-cous and goes wonderfully under tagines and cous-cous stews and would make a great morning cereal with my oatmilk.

      And your question about trading of risk against pleasure is entirely reasonable. I’m running the same calculation in my mind… I’m not one who thinks it’s necessary (not even possible) to eliminate all risks from my life. In this case, I’m likely to reduce further the amount of rice that I eat, just called the Clif Bar makers Fri to tell them I’m going to stop buying their bars since the first ingredient is brown rice syrup, but will likely continue eating some Calif rice on a regular basis.

      So, Amy, stay on the WF-PB wagon… it’s worth it for what it does for your health, for the animules you won’t be eating, and for the environment.




      24



      0
        1. I dunno… the thumbs down are probably from the militant types that allow no dissension about the gospel of Greger. But look at the results… Amy has received a boatload of thumbs up to counterbalance.

          OBTW, I gave you a thumbs down just to be mischievous. ‘-)




          4



          4
          1. To be honest – I accidentally hit thumbs down trying to figure it out too *blush* and I couldn’t unclick it. Thank you all for the support – it’s just a day to day learning to eat a different way.




            4



            2
      1. There’s trolls everywhere on internet. Why not here? I think it’s interesting to look who is giving thumbs up and down, but it’s not possible here( like for ex. in Facebook)




        2



        1
        1. Try soaking them overnight, and then rinse them before cooking. If you make them “mushy,” I think they’re more digestible = less gas—at least that’s what I have found.

          I can’t give up my brown rice completely (my favourite grain), but I do have to cut way back. Since I’ve eaten tons of brown rice (from, it turns out, Arkansas) for years, I’m screwed. Doesn’t a fibrous plant-based diet help drag toxins out of the body though?




          1



          0
        2. Beans and lentils are a good source of vegan protein which we need. When you start with eating a little and work up, the gut gets good at digesting them. What kind of protein do you suggest?




          1



          0
    5. Amy – A while back I wanted to get away from rice for other reasons and, like you, needed things to fill my tummy and feel satisfied. Rather than switching to a different grain, I wanted to eat a whole complete vegetable. So I chose potatoes (mashed with mushroom gravy is heaven!), sweet potato, winter squash, corn and corn tortillas (no oil) although corn is technically a grain, rutabaga, etc. I chose to go vegetable as opposed to a different grain because I wanted to maximize the vitamins and minerals inherent in vegetables. If you want to stick with a grain there is always whole wheat, quinoa, barley, kasha (buckwheat groats which are lovely) millet, teff. So there are many options. Have fun!




      19



      0
      1. good idea Rachel,

        Rice and beans are a staple for me…love my beans..but I add rice, now and again..i like the squash idea…and I started eating more potatoes..




        9



        0
        1. Someone asked either Dr Esselstyn or Dr Campbell what they would choose if they had to live on only three foods. The answer: Corn, squash and beans. These three foods once comprised most of the diet of Native Americans from our southwestern desert – Arizona, New Mexico, etc., and they are still the diet of the healthy Tarahumara Indians in Mexico.

          Diet really doesn’t have to be that complicated. In fact, simpler is better when the foods are whole, as close to nature as possible, clean, and as unprocessed as possible. In our era of GMO foods and the poisons that are sprayed on them so heavily, I would only recommend organic corn, soy and other grains. This is true for wheat, because a huge percentage of the national wheat crop is sprayed with Roundup shortly before harvest, causing it to dry up and complete the maturing process quickly. This is done for the convenience of the grower, NOT the health of the consumer.




          3



          0
    6. I feel the same way. I have been eating US, non CA, brown rice, two or three times a day for over a year now. And I also feed it to my vegan dogs. (One of the dogs died at age ten. Suspicious, but she had other health problems.) I will continue to eat Thai brown rice but not as much. Potatoes are on EWG’s Dirty Dozen list so I’m going to buy them organic from now on. Sweet potatoes are clean and safe as far as I know. Any strain of wheat is excellent but it has to be soaked overnight and takes a long time to cook. The exception that I know of is farro. I’m trying to phase in a lot of corn. It’s very clean and very cheap and cooks fast. A small amount of sweet corn is GMO but according to Dr. G’s video, even GMO corn is very safe. Beans are also a good starch.




      5



      1
      1. hi Blair, my dog shows up to get the trimmings when I make a soup or salad – his repertoire of favorite fruit and vegies is constantly expanding! And he loves roasted potatoes ! I have enjoyed some potatoes (roasted or boiled, whatever) with a big spoon of beans (or curried lentils) over top of the spuds and some blanches spinach alongside. Sweet potatoes are particularly good and help make a satisfying meal. I find I have to have some form of starch in the meal or I get too hungry. Some melon pieces with a few berries added makes a nice finish.




        2



        0
        1. I made the one dog baked potatoes for breakfast every Sunday. This was before I knew they were on the Dirty Dozen list. Now I will buy organic potatoes. I must add that when I started making them WFPB dog food, both of my dogs health and activity levels improved measurably. Even with pesticides and arsenic. Up until now, (conventional) potatoes and (US south grown) rice were my staple foods. I’m going to try to phase in more sweet taters and corn.




          3



          0
        2. My current (“Lab”) dog LOVES the broccoli family and comes running when I am prepping anything in that family. He eats broccoli stems, cauliflower stems, kale stems, etc. Our previous dog, a Saint Bernard, ate half of a butternut squash that I had saved for the winter before I noticed….




          4



          0
        3. Yum, this sounds very good—curried lentils over roasted sweet potatoes with a side of spinach. Must try it.

          btw, my dog enjoys chomping on collard spines and thick kale spines. She’s also a fan of sweet potatoes and green beans but for her I drizzle a little olive oil over them (no oil for me). She’s the omnivore in the house, and the only one who knows how to make ends meet.




          3



          0
      2. Blair have you tried oat groats? We switched and actually decided we prefer them more. Tad bit harder to find but Amazon carries them.




        1



        0
    7. “I guess I’m feeling a little bit of the typical american reaction of what are they gonna say is gonna kill me now? ”

      This kind of reaction happens a lot with teenagers ate a certain point…they realize that life isn’t necessarily fair and go sarcastic….as in what’s the use. Apparently many Americans are still teenagers?

      It’s an easy trap to fall into…..takes some effort and intelligence to climb out of….. Remember…if you dig a hole for yourself…don’t count on other people to care enough to worry about it…they might just be in a hole themselves…and not even realize it.

      Find out the “facts”…start gradually applying the facts…..




      1



      1
    8. Hi, Amy Rowhuff. I hear you! It can be very upsetting to learn about the contamination of our food supply. Only you can decide what risks are acceptable to you. I can tell you that your arsenic exposure might be even higher eating animal-derived foods than most plant-based whole foods. There are also wide variations in the amount of arsenic in rice depending on where it is grown. You can learn more about finding the least contaminated rice, and how to cook it to further reduce exposure, as well as how it gets contaminated in the first place, and how it compares with other foods here:
      https://nutritionfacts.org/?fwp_search=arsenic&fwp_content_type=video
      Meanwhile, you might want to explore other foods such as quinoa and millet to help you keep your belly full while decreasing your rice consumption. I hope that helps!




      1



      0
  4. Is there a way to know how much of the arsenic measured in rice is from the rice or from potential arsenic in the water the rice is being cooked in? If arsenic levels are high in the water, then cooking rice in more water may not be an effective strategy. Can the human body get rid of arsenic if one reduces the amount of arsenic they are exposed to?




    5



    0
    1. Your city, or whoever supplies your water, tests it regularly and should be happy to give you a report. If you’re on a well, you can, and probably should, have it tested for various minerals and toxins.




      0



      0
  5. So what is the bottom line? Should we eat rice at all? I eat huge amounts of brown rice each and every day, sometimes exceeding 4 cups.




    4



    0
    1. Hey John. Double check the end of the transcript, but I’m sure I read that we should strongly curtail or avoid our consumption of rice at this point. What a joy to know that there are other whole grains that provide diverse benefits and possibly without the arsenic threat – depending on how they’re grown. Could you substitute 4 cups of barley, bulgur, or quinoa?




      3



      0
    2. Have you watched all the videos on this topic ? And keep in mind it’s still a personal choice. Get the facts and make a decision. From what I’ve gathered, Limit your exposure, try some alternatives don’t stress too much.




      7



      0
  6. I’ve heard that there are also high amounts of arsenic in many other foods including many vegetables. Could anyone point me to a study showing how much? If they’re all nearly as bad as low-arsenic rice, I wouldn’t avoid rice any more than broccoli.




    6



    1
  7. Dear Sir, I am a medical doctor in Austria and I feel very sorry not to know all these facts 30 – 20 years ago. I have one question: You always write of 5 or more portions of fruits and vegetables per day (f.e. in the prostate cancer chapter). But here the people, we only eat normally three times a day (breakfast, lunch, dinner). How to understand to eat 5 or 6 times a day? Should I recommend to eat my patients (and my family and myself) to eat more often than three times a day? How big is one “portion” of fruit or vegetable?

    Thank you very much,
    Anton




    1



    0
    1. Grüße Sie Herr Doktor!

      According to Dr.Gregers Daily dozen app (android/iphone) a portion is 1 middle size fruit or 120gramms cut fruit or 60g dried fruit. The app is great!

      A serving is not related to when we eat our meals, you can eat two servings of a given item in a single meal.


      Ich bin sehr froh das es auch andere Österreicher hierher verschlägt, ganz besonders sogar da Sie Mediziner sind; ich hoffe Sie können möglichst viele Ihrer Kollegen von dieser website und den Inhalten überzeugen und unser Schönes Land Gesünder machen! :)

      Mfg, Denis




      5



      0
      1. Hallo Denis, nochmal… ;-)
        jetzt habe ich meine Antwort auf deine oben gestellte Frage in Englisch verfasst, da ich annahm, dass du diese als deine Muttersprache sprichst.
        Nur für den Fall, dass du noch mehr Antworten haben möchtest, dann kannst du mich auch direkt kontaktieren:
        Info@heilpraktiker-jurisch.de, ich bin ein Sachse der in Bayern lebt, in der Nähe von augsburg, wir sind also Nachbarn. ;-)




        0



        0
    2. Hello Dr. Anton – glad to see physicians learning this information and sharing with your patients. Here is a simple little chart explaining what a portion is. It’s surprisingly little.
      https://healthyforgood.heart.org/add-color/infographics/fruits-and-vegetables-serving-sizes

      1/2 banana, 5 grapes or cherries, 1/2C of any green vegg (broccoli, green beans, asparagus, etc), 1C of green leafy vegg raw (salad). So if you eat 5 grapes with 1/2 banana you’ve consumed two servings right there. The last time I ate cherries I ate 15 of them – yum! Who stops at 5? :-)

      I think it’s easier to get these portions in one’s diet than one at first imagines.
      Thanks for getting on board with WFPB information. Your patients will thank you more for giving them information that will truly change their health for the better, rather than give them drugs for the rest of their lives.
      Best –




      11



      0
    3. Hello Anton. Once you start eating a whole food plant based diet, you find that it’s easy to get 5-6 servings of vegetables in one meal, say a noonday salad with greens, chopped red cabbage, and two or three different types of non-starchy vegetables. Perhaps suggest your patients get cooking in the kitchen, be creative, look for recipes with foods they like, and have fun. A typical serving of vegetables is one-half cup. If you, your family, or any of your patients have smartphones, tell them to get the Daily Dozen App. It’s engineered by Dr. Michael Greger to show you the recommended amount of servings of every food you should get during the day, complete with exercise and beverages. Each box pulled up tells you what a serving size looks like and gives you some of his favorite examples.




      3



      1
    4. Dear Anton:

      While I am not Dr. Greger, I am a part-time nutrition instructor and a volunteer with this site. I hope this link helps answer your question: http://www.eatright.org/resource/food/nutrition/dietary-guidelines-and-myplate/portion-distortion. These examples relate to kids and teens, but one could surmise slightly bigger portions for adults. I love the practical examples.

      With regards to the frequency of meals and or snacks, the National Academy of Dietetics does encourage snacks as needed. I hope that helps. Cheers!




      2



      1
  8. According to the video, there’re ways to remove most of the arsenic in water. Are there ways to remove most of the arsenic in the body? Is there anything somebody who eats a lot of rice can add to the diet that would facilitate the removal pf arsenic from the body? Thanks.




    2



    0
  9. Title of the video is “How Risky is the Arsenic in Rice?” Yet 75% of the video is about the dangerous arsenic levels in bottled water. Moral of the story, kids: Don’t drink water, nor consume anything cooked in or prepared with water. Oh, and also, don’t eat rice.

    I’ve been consuming what would be considered 4 servings (160 g dry) of rice a day for years. Between cooking and drinking, I easily consume 4 L or more of water each day. By Dr. Greger’s inference, I should have gotten cancer and died ages ago. As should most Asians living and eating their traditional diet, which would include as much or more rice and water.*

    But according to Dr. Greger’s own videos, incidence of chronic diseases in Asian countries only started escalating in the 80’s with the adoption of a more Western-style diet and reduced rice consumption.

    *Yes, there is an Arsenic poisoning problem in Bangladesh. It stems from toxic levels in the water. Unfortunately, there are toxic levels of a lot of hazardous substances in the water there stemming from industrial sources and lax safety standards (which is actually the reason so many of the global apparel and shoe manufacturers set up shop there to begin with).




    7



    3
    1. I think your inference of what the good doctor said is mistaken, especially when it comes to your conclusion that you in particular should’ve gotten cancer by now… statistics talk about what happens to *groups* of people, not the individuals per se. The tobacco industry regularly rolled out the exceptional centinarian that was still smoking cigarettes without coming down with cancer. That said, an individual can look at what the statistics say is happening to the group and choose to change their choices/behavior.

      Your comments re: the incidence of cancer in Asia are closer to being valid except your overlooking the facts that they don’t grow their rice on fields which had tons of As-based pesticides dumped on them and they tend to polish away the bran which collects the As. I’m not going to argue about whether it’s the rice or the SAD as I agree that the Asians are suffering diminished health due to adopting the SAD.




      10



      0
      1. The point wasn’t that only I consume that much rice and I’ve yet to develop cancer, but rather the amount I consume is/was rather common for billions of people. You’ll find some research that shows the urine As level of rice-loving Asians to be 2-3 times that of non-rice-loving Caucasians. Yet if you look up research on overall cancer incidence by country, the top 50 is almost entirely composed of European and North American countries (with exceptions of Taiwan, Korea and possibly Japan near the bottom of the list – Asian countries with the highest meat consumption).

        It’s not as simple as “Well, As increases cancer risk. There’s As in rice. Therefore, rice increases cancer risk.” I actually find it at once amusing and disappointing that Dr. Greger is using this tactic when in many of his past videos he’s gone out of his way to warn against making such questionable inferences.

        I’ve mentioned these in previous comments on other recent “Arsenic in rice” videos, but I (along with those billions of Asians) exclusively consume rice grown in Thailand and India. And only consume spring water.

        It would be nice if Dr. Greger would do a video on the risks of endocrine disruptors in bottled vs tap water. On the one hand you have clean water in contact with plastic. On the other you have dirty water that contains plastics, hormones and all sorts of other human and industrial waste, much of which cannot be filtered out by municipal water treatment facilities. That would be a lot more interesting than beating to death this “Arsenic in rice” thing.




        5



        1
        1. You’ll find some research that shows the urine As level of rice-loving Asians to be 2-3 times that of non-rice-loving Caucasians.

          I keep reading about these references to high urine levels of Arsenic… this suggests to me that the body has a way of getting rid of the Arsenic.

          I would like to read some research that addresses the amount ingested and the amount gotten rid of through waste. It seems one possibility is that the body sees Arsenic as bad and expels it via waste.




          5



          0
  10. Is there any data at all showing increased incidence of arsenic related/associated cancers in the predominantly rice eating countries (China, Japan, etc.)?

    I would also love to see similar for cadmium in cultures that consume a lot of cacao.




    5



    0
    1. A question that I, along with a few others on here, have been asking for a while. See comment just above yours.

      Here are a couple of lists with per capita rice consumption for select regions and countries:

      http://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/agriculture-and-food/oecd-fao-agricultural-outlook-2015/rice-projections-consumption-per-capita_agr_outlook-2015-table125-en
      http://www.uark.edu/ua/ricersch/pdfs/per_capita_rice_consumption_of_selected_countries.pdf

      Here’s a list of the countries with the highest incidence of cancer:

      http://www.wcrf.org/int/cancer-facts-figures/data-cancer-frequency-country

      You’ll notice from the OECD link that per capita rice consumption in ‘LDC Asia’ (LDC=less developed countries – i.e. not South Korea, Taiwan and Japan) is literally 10 times that of ‘North America’ and 20 times that of Europe. There seems to be a rather strong negative correlation between the two: Countries with the lowest per capita rice consumption seem to have the highest incidence of cancer, and vice versa. Care to explain, Dr. Greger?




      8



      0
      1. Cancer incidence is usually associated with age. People in wealthy Western countries tend to live longer than people in LDC for a whole raft of reasons. That could be one reason they have more cancers. Another might be that people in LDCs eat more anti cancer plant foods or the soils there have more selenium than US and European soils.
        Trying to explain cancer mortality/morbidity differences between those two groups of countries by a single variable like rice consumption is highly vulnerable to confounding even if a range of variables is controlled. Your analysis of course didn’t even try to control for any other variables.




        3



        0
        1. TG wrote: “Cancer incidence is usually associated with age.”

          Yes, it is. And that is why if you click on the link with the cancer incidence data, it reads “Age-Standardised”. That means adjusted to account for different age distributions within different country populations.

          Bottom line, it’s not (just) the rice, since those who consume the most appear to have the lowest overall incidence of cancer. It could be the water the rice is cooked in, if the As level in the water supply has reached a toxic level (Bangladesh example cited earlier).




          2



          0
  11. Hi, I’m curious if this video is specifically talking about “white” rice or all types of rice,i.e. “brown long grain” rice?

    Thanks.

    Tony




    0



    0
    1. Tony – Please go back and view the series on rice. Dr. G has already addressed this issue of brown vs white as well as a variety of other” rice-color” issues.




      4



      0
      1. Hi Tony,

        Dr Greger has indeed covered a bit about the variation in arsenic between types of rice: ‘Which rice has less arsenic‘ and ‘Brands with Least Arsenic‘.
        As for this video, I had a look at the sources cited, and even within them they mention the uncertainty of rice types on which the data is taken from. Therefore, I would recommend just following Dr Greger’s advice in the video on how to cook rice to reduce arsenic.




        0



        0
    2. I think it’s both whole grain rice and white rice. If I don’t rememer wrong the whole grain levels of arsenic was even higher, because it is in the fibres, but the uptake will be lower because of the fibres. And the advantages of “whole grain” will be much more beneficial than white ( always) dr. John Mcdougall has a interwiew with dr. Dennis (forgot sir name) about the great advantages of fibres in the food.
      If afraid of too much arsenic, try quinoa, wheat,oat,whole grain pasta, beans or why not




      1



      0
    3. Hi Tony,

      Dr Greger has indeed covered a bit about the variation in arsenic between types of rice: ‘Which rice has less arsenic‘ and ‘Brands with Least Arsenic‘.
      As for this video, I had a look at the sources cited, and even within them they mention the uncertainty of rice types on which the data is taken from. Therefore, I would recommend just following Dr Greger’s advice in the video on how to cook rice to reduce arsenic.




      0



      0
  12. There are problems with this approach to arsenic consumption. First, individual consumption varies considerably. And second, the amount ingested is not as relevant as the amount an individual ABSORBS. The easy solution is to get tested for arsenic and be guided by the results in limiting your exposure. An easy blood test will tell every person what they need to know.




    3



    0
  13. What do you think about the following study? It is said that seafood contains high arsenic but it is in organic form while cruciferous vegetables, grains, legumes also contain a lot of arsenic and apparently not in organic form.

    https://nutritionj.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1475-2891-12-149

    This finding is consistent with recent studies documenting high concentrations of arsenic in Brussels sprouts and other cruciferous vegetables [13] that may result from their high concentrations of sulfur; arsenite is known to bind preferentially to sulfur-containing compounds [68] as part of cellular detoxification of arsenic in plants [69]. As such, further evaluation of Brussels sprouts and other cruciferous plants containing high concentrations of sulfur [70] may be warranted, especially in geographic areas where soils or irrigation water may contain high concentrations of arsenic.




    3



    4
    1. See, that’s the problem with all this “nutrition science”: cruciferous vegetables are generally praised and recommended by nutritionists for their healthy properties, but then again even these beneficial foods have a downside.

      There is also no best practice in evaluating these various foods. Often articles and research only deals with one aspect, for example the role of one specific component in a specific food / vegetable, while ignoring / not evaluating other aspects. There should be a best practice, that follows a certain procedure in evaluating all possible beneficial and adverse properties of a food.

      A beneficial property would be something like an anti-oxidative effect or an anti-baterical effect of compounds that are contained in a food.
      An adverse property would be the increase of the absorption of toxic heavy metals, after consuming that food.

      A standard checklist of all possible effects of a food and the contained compounds could be developed, so that every food is evaluated along these lines based on the existing research.




      2



      0
    2. Jerry Lewis: – let me quote from the research you cited:
      “Results
      As expected, toenail arsenic concentrations increased with household water arsenic concentrations. Among the foods known to be high in arsenic, no clear relationship between toenail arsenic and rice consumption was detected, but there was a positive association with consumption of dark meat fish, a category that includes tuna steaks, mackerel, salmon, sardines, bluefish, and swordfish. Positive associations between toenail arsenic and consumption of white wine, beer, and Brussels sprouts were also observed; these and most other associations were not modified by exposure via water. However, consumption of two foods cooked in water, beans/lentils and cooked oatmeal, was more strongly related to toenail arsenic among those with arsenic-containing drinking water (≥1 μg/L).”

      If you read your research, you would know that this piece of research was about the arsenic in tap drinking water. The focus was on the water and the arsenic in the food changed as related to the arsenic found in the water. It is interesting to me that you left out completely the part about positive association of arsenic with the seafoods listed. You constantly pick at Dr. G for – according to you – cherry-picking information. A little hypocracy here perhaps?




      15



      2
      1. It is selective posting and cherry picked from a research article as usual. How about the following sentences that arsenic does not always come from boiling water but from the nature of arsenic that is attracted to foods with sulfur? Note that this research article was written in a very impartial way and they look at all angles and all foods. Unlike your usual cherry picked.

        “In addition to Brussels sprouts, toenail arsenic was related to consumption of several other foods that are often – but not always – cooked in water, including oatmeal and legumes (beans or lentils).

        This finding is consistent with recent studies documenting high concentrations of arsenic in Brussels sprouts and other cruciferous vegetables [13] that may result from their high concentrations of sulfur; arsenite is known to bind preferentially to sulfur-containing compounds [68] as part of cellular detoxification of arsenic in plants [69].”




        0



        10
      2. Funny on how the people over here are so overprotective when it comes to contaminated plant foods. Oh yeah it’s one side, unscientific studies, but when it is animal foods then they will zoom in all articles that talk about the bad things while omitting the articles that talk about the good things. This is called cherry picked research and cherry is good for you.




        0



        8
        1. Jerry Lewis – I’m sure you are right and correct. In all things probably. I’m confidant there is no one who knows more than you and is no more right than you. We all bow to your superior knowledge, expertise, and correctness in all things. I pay homage to your superiorness in all things (bow, bow). Jerry Lewis is, I am quite sure, the most knowledgeable of the knowledgeable and is right and correct in all things. I cede to your superior expertise in all world knowledge.




          3



          0
        2. Jerry, try not to over-generalize? ‘The people here’ are a group varying greatly in knowledge and type of response to global assertions. Dean Martin would handle the level of complexity much better, but hang in there!




          0



          0
  14. Hi,
    I followed the discussion around rice a little bit, though I haven’t seen the latest video yet (cannot watch it currently, as I’m on a computer with no audio). I wonder what is the consensus now? Should we stop eating rice?

    What (non-exotic) alternatives are recommended as a substitute for rice? Should we just eat pasta or potatoes? How about bulgur and couscous, which are widely available, at least in my country? I’m not into buckwheat and I cannot afford buying some very exotic and expensive foodstuffs like Quinoa.




    1



    1
    1. Hi IkeMan!

      So I would direct you to a great answer that another Moderator Thea wrote on this thread. Here is what she said:

      “Arsenic is a real health concern. So, it’s worth investigating arsenic levels in food. When Dr. Greger did the investigating, he found out that relatively high levels of arsenic can be found in rice which is grown in contaminated soil. Happily, we have a way to purchase rice that we can reasonably expect to be grown with low contamination: ie, rice grown in California or Asian countries. So, if we have concerns about arsenic, we can still continue to enjoy rice. We just need to be a bit choosy about which rice we buy.

      Dr. Greger generally recommends that we a variety of foods. While many people from Asian countries eat low arsenic rice every day (without health effects? I’m not clear on that) and we could theoretically copy that eating pattern, why not enjoy rice sometimes and other times enjoy the wide variety of other intact grains available to us? Have you tried: quinoa, millet, barley (a personal favorite), amaranth, teff, farro, spelt berries, groats, etc? If you ate a variety of grains, you would vary your exposure to risks as well as reap the benefits highlighted in the various foods.

      If you can get a hold of an electric pressure cooker (say an Instant Pot), you would be able to very make all these grains in a breeze! It’s so fun to experiment with new grains. See if you can find a store with a bulk bin section. Then you can try a little bit of various types of grains to see what you like best.

      That’s what I’ve gotten from this series and my understanding of Dr. Greger’s work (and a bit thrown in from my own experience regarding preparation). Make sense to you too? Feel less overwhelming?”

      Hope this helps :)




      1



      0
  15. The first three links in the “Doctor’s Note” appear to be broken. Clicking them says page not found. At least one of the lower links works so I don’t think it’s my browser/computer. Thanks.




    0



    1
  16. James IV – if you look at the links you will see a date in parenthesis. That is the date they will be posted for viewing. They are not yet available to watch.




    5



    0
  17. Arsenic regulatory standards are based on linear no-threshold toxicology models, which may not be valid as there’s evidence that low-dose exposure is not associated with harms. The original data
    behind the US EPA’s 10 μg As/L drinking water regulation came from southwest Taiwan, but further analysis found a threshold for no increased risk there around 151 μg/L. Among Danes, there was no association of cancer risk and drinking water arsenic up to 25 μg/L, with an association with reduced skin cancer risk at higher intakes. The cancer most associated with As is bladder cancer, and among Americans exposure to groundwater with 3-60 μg/L didn’t increase bladder cancer mortality, while the most recent systemic review of As and bladder cancer epidemiology found no strong evidence for risk with drinking water below 50 μg/L (5 times the U.S. regulatory limit). A recent margin of exposure analysis found

    Multiple epidemiological studies support the conclusion that the dose–response relationship for arsenic-induced cancer is nonlinear and is likely to have a threshold. In particular, elevated cancer risks associated with arsenic exposure have not been observed in U.S. populations exposed to arsenic concentrations in drinking water with mean concentrations up to 190 μg/L

    In benchtop studies, there’s no question that exposure to cells to > 10 μM As is harmful. At lower levels, the evidence is more equivocal, with 0.1-1 μM increasing innate antioxidant and DNA responses, protecting them against further oxidative stress. Curiously, low-dose arsenic exposure extends nematode lifespan.

    We should be concerned with environmental and food toxins, but I think an understanding of how plant phytochemicals lower risk entails an understanding of hormesis, with suprising implications for a variety of natural and manmade compounds. Unwarranted concern and chronic anxiety entails its own risks.




    13



    0
    1. “Unwarranted concern and chronic anxiety entails its own risks.”

      Unwarranted concern is being pushed in these videos. To me this is awfully close to fear mongering.




      3



      3
      1. No. The concerns are there….the issue is what you do about them.

        What about the current US population with increasing rates of obesity….and I’m fairly sure increasing rates of diseases at later ages? Not to mention higher early disease rates for children?

        Nothing to fear here……




        1



        0
  18. Hello Gang!
    I am interested if anyone in this community has any experience with the Berkey water filtration (counter top) system. Pertinent to this conversation, Berkey claims that its filters can remove arsenic and other heavy metals along with fluoride yet retain the valuable beneficial minerals like calcium, magnesium, etc. I find that intuitively impossible – how can a filter remove these small elements, like arsenic, flouride, and let through larger elements like Mg and Ca? So I’m wondering if anyone out there has done any home experiments with their Berkey water filters and done pre and post water testing as a matter of interest?
    Thanks!!




    2



    0
    1. they may put in calcium carbonate in the final part. some filters do that, and some bottled water. water filter test data seems to be kind of sparse on casual search on the web




      0



      0
  19. I have to admit the Rice series has thrown me for a loop. Not only do I drink a lot of water throughout the day I also consume about 2-3 times the suggested rice servings per day about 2-4 times a week that include rice, rice patties, and rice pasta. Really a set back since I’m gluten sensitive. This means I’ll just have to be more diligent in product selections.

    Correct me if I’m wrong, but to me it appears that the water supply is the primary source of As, and since most of us use it through out the day from cooking, drinking and bathing, we just can’t help but come into contact with it.

    Rice just happens to be another measurable source of contamination.

    What if we substitute our water with RO or some other method of contamination removal and add back the healthy minerals that were removed?

    Just a thought..

    Comments welcomed and thanks again to the NFOrg for such a great job.

    David




    0



    0
    1. David, I and billions of Asians would have cancer if the whole ‘Arsenic in rice’ thing was as significant factor. As mentioned in an earlier comment, I eat 4 servings of rice a day, and consume 4+ L of water a day. Like those billions of Asians, I eat rice exclusively from Asia (Thailand and India), despite not living there. I also exclusively drink and prepare my food with spring water.

      I’m more concerned about endocrine disruptors from the plastic 5 gallon jugs than I am about Arsenic. I’ve been considering getting a reverse-osmosis set up at home, but my understanding is that there are plastics in the RO systems as well.




      1



      1
      1. The Asians eat meat, seafood, grain including rice, bean, nut, vegetable, legume and breath air and drink water 100 times more polluted than ours and yet they live very long and healthy. May be it’s because they don’t drink milk. But wait. the Swiss, French, Israeli, Icelandic drink milk and eat cheese and butter and most of the above foods and live long and healthy too. So milk is not a problem. So what is the common denominator among these cultures that live long? It looks like they eat everything including meat and dairy and vegetables, legumes, bean, grain, rice to stay healthy and not worry too much like us.




        0



        7
        1. Jerry Lewis – Populations in those developed countries you listed may live longer, but they’re definitely not living healthier. If you bother clicking the link with the cancer incidence data by country, you will notice all those developed countries you listed are at the top of the list, i.e. they have the highest cancer incidence. They also happen to have the lowest rice consumption and highest meat (and dairy) consumption.

          That’s why in recent years there have been different measures for life expectancy developed, such as health-adjusted life expectancy (HALE), which looks at how long one can expect to live without chronic disease. In many Western countries, the different between actual life expectancy and HALE is 15 years (depending on income level). A long life does not necessarily mean a healthy life. Just look at the trillions of dollars being spent on drugs and surgery in Western economies.




          2



          0
          1. To Jerry Lewis and Poop Patrol – PP makes the point that is relevant to me and my life – quality of life. I ate a “healthy” meat & dairy based diet for years with plenty of vegg. No junk food, processed foods, only olive oil. As I aged my cholesterol climbed, my uric acid climbed and I developed gout, my blood sugars climbed to pre-diabetic level (125 fasting blood sugar, 1 point from full blown diabetes), thyroid numbers went up (wrong direction), weight increased to overweight. Changing to WFPB diet reversed all my numbers back to normal. In addition I feel better – more energy, easier to control my weight. Before going WFPB I was faced with the situation – per my physician – of beginning drugs for cholesterol, diabetes, gout . . .for the rest of my life. At 54 I was not interested in that path. Choosing WFPB eating has changed all of that and allowed me to take no medications at all. Information from this site has allowed me to reverse my panel of chronic disease conditions. And while it may be technically true and accurate that I may, in fact, not live any longer than animal-based eaters, I already know that I am living better and healthier than when I ate meat and dairy. Ten years of eating this way has saved me ten years worth of having to buy drugs for my diseases from the pharmaceutical companies. In a sense, I don’t really care what JL’s research shows and what he may present here. From my point of view and experience I know what worked for me and what continues to work to positively affect my health and quality of life. I know how to control these disease states. For my personal situation,there is simply no dispute about WFPB-eating and my physician sees this as well. So keep presenting your “research” JL. . . but for me your “facts” are a non-issue. Because the facts of my life and the increased quality of my life prove something different to me. SAD eaters and WFPB eaters may, in fact, live the same amount of time on this earth. But I already know, from my own experience, that I am living a better, more physically comfortable life. Because I feel better – 10 years worth. And while I am an “experiment” of 1, it is the most important experiment to me.




            5



            0
            1. Congrats, Rachel. I used to have a friend named Rachel who was your age and also suffering from chronic diseases on a SAD. I tried to convince her to try to improve her diet, but she apparently chose to be a shut-in (her chronic joint pain combined with her weight made her practically immobile) rather than give up animal products.

              And what you experienced isn’t an n=1 situation. JL is just spouting nonsense. The data actually supports your conclusion.

              Here are the WHO tables for life expectancy and health-adjusted life expectancy (HALE):

              http://apps.who.int/gho/data/node.main.688
              http://apps.who.int/gho/data/view.main.HALEXv

              USA (2015) : 79.3 vs 69.1 years
              UK (2015): 81.2 vs 71.4 years

              Thailand: 74.9 vs 66.8 years
              China: 76.1 vs 68.5 years

              Despite their far more advanced ‘health’ care, the average Canadian and American can expect to live 10 years or more of their life in poor health. By contrast the average Thai or Chinese person will live 7-8 years of their life in poor health. Sure, an American will live on average 3 years longer than a Chinese person, but almost all of that will be spent in poor health.

              Oh, and I just happened to pick China and Thailand because they’re well known for producing and consuming lots of rice. Hope you’ve enjoyed and will keep enjoying lots of rice on your WFPB diet, Rachel. Cheers




              2



              1
              1. And Chinese and Thai people eat a lot of meat, seafood, fat, legume, grain, rice, bean, vegetables… In general, they eat everything and a balanced diet.




                0



                5
      2. I was shocked to see how much water an RO filter wastes. Far more water goes down the drain than comes out the filter tap.

        Love my Berkey, but I haven’t done any experiments with it.




        0



        0
    1. Aloha,
      Here in Hawaii, the habit of eating white rice 7 days a week starting with breakfast is common. While some populations in Hawaii have some of the highest diabetes rates in the nation, I am not aware of any studies showing that the people of Hawaii have high rates of arsenic related illnesses.In part, could be due to the fact that the rice eaten here is mainly from Asian countries and not the south of the US. So I get from these well researched articles that rice grown on contaminated soils is bad. That includes most American grown rice especially in the South but some California rices are within safe limits.Again, I would like to see any studies showing a high arsenic related disease pattern among people in Asia who do eat rice 5-7 days a week as well as in some South American countries.Water filtration will help with the chemicals in your water.




      4



      0
  20. How crazy that the healthier I try to eat, the more we learn about the dangers of so-called healthy foods! After watching this video, I am actually less concerned about daily rice limitations than I am to learn about the dangerous arsenic levels in bottled water. I can substitute other grains for rice and be okay with that, but I gave up drinking all beverages except for water and herbal tea made from water. Is there a way to protect us from the arsenic in water? Is tap water better than bottled water? Does boiling the water help? I tried looking up other videos in Nutrition facts and nothing comes up in the search for arsenic levels in water.




    1



    0
    1. Barbara, I know how you feel. Would love an indepth report(s) on water–well-water, bottled spring water (yes, we know about plastic) and most importantly about using a distiller at home(not in plastic bottles off shelf). Our lives are dependent on water above all else–not taking cost into mind– what is the best water to have or consume. ( I have used bottled spring water out of necessity and have a personal water distiller for home use(stainless tank). The electric use is about .45 cents a gallon distilled). What else can one do to assure safe water. Yes, I know about R osmosis . Yes, my brown rice is rinsed several times, soaked then water disposed , then rice cooked in MY water. What else can be done toward healthy consumption.




      0



      0
  21. Rice is a staple. A staple food for millions of people all over the world and on the micro / nano level, it’s a staple for my plant-based regimen. How is this now to be considered a carcinogen? Are you sure about this?




    1



    0
    1. Barba, correction: It’s a staple for BILLIONS of people all over the world. See my comment elsewhere with links to per capita rice consumption in different countries and incidence of cancer by country. I thought I ate a lot of rice (160 g dry) every day, the equivalent of 4 servings. Apparently there are Asian countries where the average person eats 3-4 times what I eat. That’s up to 16 servings a day. And those countries are nowhere to be found in the top 50 countries with the highest incidence of cancer.

      As I also mentioned in a comment on a previous video in this ‘Arsenic in rice’ series, US rice comprises just 1.4 % of total world rice production. It’s really easy to avoid eating US rice, even if one lives in the US. Supermarkets, and especially ethnic markets, are full of sacs of rice from India, Thailand, Japan, China and a number of other Asian countries.




      3



      0
        1. LG King – First, if you check the link to the overall cancer incidence stats, you will notice Thailand is nowhere to be found in the top 50 countries in terms of cancer incidence.

          I went to the IARC site (the World Health Organization arm that does cancer research). Thailand’s age-adjusted cancer incidence per 100,000 (the same stat used for that list) is just 149. For comparison, Costa Rica, at the bottom of the top 50 list, has 211 per 100,000. Compared to the rest of the world, Thailand’s cancer incidence is quite low.

          I also checked incidence by type of cancer for Thailand. The top 2 were liver and lung cancer. While these could be related to arsenic, a quick search indicates that’s not the issue.

          http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/26/world/asia/26iht-thailand.html

          “The raw fish that is so avidly consumed in the stilt houses that sit among rice paddies and wetlands of the country’s northern provinces contain parasites that can accumulate in the liver and lead to a deadly cancer. Known as bile duct cancer, it… represents the majority of the 70 liver cancer deaths a day in Thailand”

          https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3097734/

          ” There is a higher incidence rate of lung cancer in northern Thailand than other areas”

          Rice may play a role, but it’s not what you may think. Thai rice farmers undertake open-field burning of their rice paddy fields after harvest to enrich the soil. Most of the agriculture occurs in Northern Thailand.So you can say the major cause of lung cancer in Thailand is smoking, but not necessarily from cigarettes.

          http://scienceasia.org/2007.33.n3/v33_339_345.pdf

          “In Thailand and many other Asian countries, where rice is the major crop, open burning of rice straw after harvesting is a common practice. This activity releases a large amount of air pollutants, which can cause serious effects on the ambient air quality, public health and climate.”




          2



          0
  22. My water supply for the house is well water. However, I haven’t drank that water for the past 20 years or more. I instead buy RO water from the city water supply and bring it home and distill it in my stainless steel home distiller. The water never touches anything but glass before and after the stainless steel distiller.

    My question is, does distillation remove any possible arsenic contamination?




    0



    0
    1. Your distilled water has no magnesium?

      no links

      If the researchers had given their subjects magnesium for a longer period of time, or used higher doses, or given them a more easily absorbable form of magnesium, they might have obtained better results. The table below suggests this. It shows that the magnesium level rose by a meagre 4 percent in the subjects that had received magnesium.

      There are considerable variations in the quality of drinking water in Norway. The researchers studied variations in magnesium and calcium levels in drinking water between different areas, as these are assumed to have a role in the development of bone strength. They wanted to examine whether there was a correlation between magnesium and calcium concentrations in drinking water and the incidence of hip fracture.

      The study results show that magnesium protects against hip fracture for both men and women. The researchers found no independent protective effect of calcium.

      It’s well known that cardiovascular deaths, including sudden cardiac deaths, occur far less frequently in areas that have hard water, which contains lots of minerals, compared to areas with soft water, which is relatively mineral free. British researchers took a close look at this data and narrowed the protective effects to one specific mineral: magnesium.

      Magnesium is a viable option for preventing sudden cardiac death because it plays key roles in several aspects of cardiovascular health, and deficiencies are linked to an increased risk of hypertension, heart attack, heart failure, and death. Subpar levels also promote electrical instability in the heart and are associated with a variety of rhythm disturbances, including ventricular arrhythmia and sudden cardiac arrest.




      0



      0
      1. Ludi Chris – I am so glad you brought this subject up. Perhaps Dr. G will do a series on magnesium and its important role. For decades I have had an arrhythmia. Doc offered me a beta blocker which I declined (over 40 years ago). In doing my research I added 400 mgs of magnesium citrate (the citrate form is important) to my diet and my arrhythmia reduced considerably. I live in a hard water area but I apparently needed more. I notice that when I get out of the habit of taking my Mg my arrhythmia returns and ‘reminds’ me to get back on the program. But also, I recently added mineral water to my day. I love the taste of San Pellegrino. And although I can’t get information from the company on what its mineral content is exactly, it seems to me that my arrhythmia completely goes away when I sip some regularly. Perhaps its a combination of all of the minerals together.
        A friend’s spouse developed a severe arrhythmia out of the blue. The Docs (numerous second opinions) wanted to destroy her thyroid (assuming, without proof, that the problem was thyroid) and put her on Synthroid the rest of her life. A nutritionist finally learned that this person NEVER ate vegetables, a natural source of Mg from green leafy’s. This person was put on Mg and the arrhythmia disappeared. Many lessons in this story.
        For those that are interested, Nova has released a most interesting piece on our physiologic relationship to minerals. An hour long piece, it is DEFINITELY worth watching.
        http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/earth/life-rocky-start.html
        Perhaps Dr. G will do a series on this most important topic.
        Thanks for your comments on magnesium, a most important mineral in short supply in those who do not consume greens.




        2



        0
      2. Ludi, good information.

        Doesn’t apply here though because I take a magnesium veggie cap morning and night. I also eat raw organic cocao powder at different times of the day and often eat a small chunk of Baker’s chocolate that I melt and keep in the fridge (both have copious amounts of magnesium.)

        As for calcium, I do not take that as I’ve come to believe it contributes to plaque in the blood vessels. I eat prunes (dried plums) multiple times a day as I have read that eating at least six of those per day apparently holds down the activity of osteoblasts (bone calcium eaters) and thus make it less necessary for the activity of osteoclasts (bone builders.)

        I suppose ideally it would be good to have the perfect mix of minerals in one’s water, but I personally don’t think it is necessary. Now with the ability to consume what we need via supplementation and/or from the food and beverage we eat or drink.

        My own blood work-up shows Calcium at the mid-point of the High-Low range.

        Not sure if I’ve been checked for Magnesium levels but as long as I’m not having foot or leg cramps at night, I’m thinking I’m good with what I’m getting.




        0



        0
    1. I’m not sure you saw this in the video : https://nutritionfacts.org/video/which-rice-has-less-arsenic-black-brown-red-white-or-wild/
      Which Rice Has Less Arsenic: Black, Brown, Red, White, or Wild? but Dr Greger indicated that an average of eight samples of wild rice ” put it nearly comparable to white, though containing only about half as much toxic arsenic as brown.” Too bad as he also stated he’d hoped for better results. Guess we can’t just all start eating wild rice as a simple answer.




      0



      0
  23. Mike ... creadick ...access any new research on whether the pros outweigh the cons of eating avocados… Dr. Gregor posted an article a while back that it might be better to wait and see… Any new research? Mike ... creadick ...access any new research on whether the pros outweigh the cons of eating avocados… Dr. Gregor posted an article a while back that it might be better to wait and see… Any new research? says:

    Hi… any idea on how to access Dr. Gregor’s article on “avocados pros and cons “… or access any new research on whether the pros outweigh the cons of eating avocados… Dr. Gregor posted an article a while back that it might be better to wait and see… Any new research?




    0



    0
  24. Hi… any idea on how to access Dr. Gregor’s article on “avocados pros and cons “… or access any new research on whether the pros outweigh the cons of eating avocados… Dr. Gregor posted an article a while back that it might be better to wait and see… Any new research?




    0



    0
    1. Hi Mike, you can find topics by hovering on Video Library at the top and going to “Browse Videos by Topic.” Also, there are a couple of new avocado videos coming out around November!




      0



      0
  25. If arsenic comes in rice from the ground and water, it means that it has it in every vegetable and all grains. What does arsenic concentration depend on in some vegetables or grains?
    Of course, saturated fats, choline, TMA,cholesterol, toxins of bacteria and polioma viruses are always in the meat, plus arsenic, heavy metals, etc. Meat, milk, eggs are definitely dangerous.
    Thanks to Dr. Gregor, and thanks to all the commentators, the comments are very useful :-)




    0



    0
  26. We enjoy and learn a lot from these series’s. However, this one seems to be very repetitive (for example today’s video says nothing that hasn’t already been presented in earlier videos in this series). When each video gives new information they are instructive and interesting. Those are the ones we enjoy.




    3



    0
  27. The Plant Based Nutrition Certificate, along with The China Study and Whole has convinced me that Dr. Campbell has pinpointed the main cause of confusion among Americans when it comes to nutrition. The cause is the reductionist worldview of many nutrition researchers that results in their belief that randomized control trials are the most reliable approach to establish causal relationships between diet and disease.

    Dr. Campbell’s view is directly opposed to this belief. He writes in his article “Research Methodology in Cancer Research” that “A randomized control study design focuses on one factor, one outcome and generally one mechanism at a time. This is not nutrition; it is pharmacology. Such studies often create more confusion than clarification”.

    Focusing on specific nutrients and their specific effects has resulted in a lack of confidence among Americans on what constitutes the ideal human diet.
    http://nutritionstudies.org/reductionist-paradigm-cause-nutrition-confusion/




    1



    0
  28. As someone with celiac disease (something that is almost never talked about in the plant-based community), I find it extremely frustrating that rice is becoming the new eggs/dairy/meat/etc. Things I must avoid with my unique expression of CD: gluten and gliadin (of course), oats (even certified GF), millet (highly cross-reactive), yeasts (the bread kind and “nutritional” kind), and more cross-reactive foods. All that’s really left is rice and now that seems to be a red light food. PLEASE HELP!!!




    1



    0
    1. Buy rice from California….soak and wash it first….then cook it like you would pasta with extra water…dump the water before use. Result? Rice with about the lowest arsenic levels you will manage…. You can find Lundberg rice on Amazon.




      1



      0
    2. The world is increasingly polluted which affects our food. We need to support efforts to clean up the environment where needed and we need to try to prevent more pollution. I am in the country and am increasingly aware of a burning smell in our air on certain days…. We just need to do the best we can and not worry too much because we cannot achieve perfection in our lives.




      0



      0
    3. Claire – there is LOTS left to eat, even those with celiac disease. For your starch base you can go completely grain free and use winter squash, potatoes of all sorts, corn, root vegetables, or kasha, quinoa. There are many many choices. For starters, why don’t you review the many comments in this thread because are already lots of suggestions. Don’t panic – read.




      1



      0
      1. I do go mostly grain free as there are so many I am reactive to. Pumpkin and beets are my carb favourites, but I do think whole-grains are important for b-vitamins and fibre. Oh well, I mostly just wish plant doctors would cover this topic instead of turning a blind eye to the prevalent science that IS out there… :'(




        0



        0
    4. Yeasts a problem as well. Can i ask, are you able to eat fruits like grapes and other fruits that naturally have
      yeast on this skins? This has been a concern of mine.




      0



      0
  29. Here’s a link to another point of view from Dr. McDougall’s website from a 2014 newsletter. I’m still pondering all this information, but eat quite a lot of brown rice regularly.




    0



    0
  30. Will the arsenic levels in the water combine with the rice to make it even higher? And is there a way to filter water at home to remove arsenic? If arsenic is aloud in other foods we could really be in trouble.




    1



    0
  31. Hello,

    I’m having a love affair with an organic tortilla chip (I won’t mention the vendor name), but it contains organic brown rice. I contacted the vendor about the rice/arsenic issue to find out a bit more about the rice used in their chips. Their answer was as follows: “Our supplier’s organic brown rice is grown in California, Uruguay and Argentina. For the varieties of our chips that contain organic brown rice, the content is about 4-5% of the overall Multigrain Chips.”

    Is this a lot of rice/arsenic intake? I eat these every day!! I’m freaking out!!

    Thank you.




    0



    0
  32. There was a USDA circular out there, specialty rice farmers median income went way up something like $80k in 2006 to $280k in 2013. Also their herbicide use went up 50% and 75% of US rice is HT herbicide resistant strain. Seems they could afford to do more to fix arsenic. FDA has arsenic in rice comment period open I think I’ll give them some input.




    0



    0
  33. It’s disturbing that the public is only now, in recent years, learning about arsenic levels in rice. I only learned of it for the first time last month. If you do a Google News search going back a couple decades, the first reports of it seem to show up around 2007. But it’s not been a prominent topic until recently. Shocking stuff.




    0



    0
    1. https://nutritionfacts.org/video/arsenic-in-rice/

      This video is from 2011. This topic was discussed previously on Nutrition Facts so am puzzled why this huge indepth but very biased video series is presented now. It is biased in the way the information is being presented. All rice is being lumped together as dangerous without any scientific studies showing rice being the culprit. Also, all rice is not created equal. There are many sources for low arsenic rice.

      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/worth-switching-white-rice-brown/

      Here is a video from 2016 where the benefits of brown rice over white rice are shown no mention of arsenic. I can not find any new testing so this series on arsenic in rice does not make sense. That is why I contend that this whole series is unwarrented concern and down right fear where it doesn’t belong.




      1



      0
  34. Hi Dr. Greger,

    Thank you for all you do to educate people about how food can affect their health.

    I have a few questions about the arsenic in rice issue.

    Shouldn’t countries where the inhabitants eat a lot of rice have high bladder cancer rates because of all the arsenic they are consuming with their rice?

    Also shouldn’t people in the U.S., like Asian Americans, who tend to eat a lot of rice, (which presumably) would be grown in the U.S,
    have high bladder cancer rates compared to non rice eatters.. Are you aware of studies which show this?

    Also could the food you eat along with the rice affect how much arsenic you absorb. For example, comparing the amount of arsenic you would absorb eating a plain cup of rice vs eating the rice along with a bean dish, onions, garlic and a salad.

    Thanks,

    Ken




    0



    0
  35. My wife and I just watched your pilot PBS screening live. We are so impressed, we just sent an email to our local PBS station Oregon Public Broadcasting, requesting they air your presentation and help save the lives of thousands.

    The presentation was outstanding!!! I would like to be able to get the 2 dvd presentation to show to others in our whole plant and vegan groups.

    Thank you for all you do!

    John & Donna Weaver




    0



    0
    1. We just had the pleasure of watching Dr Greger’s PBS special (we’re out in British Columbia) . Congratulations ! It was a wonderful presentation, and I am thrilled to think of how many more people will get to hear the message now. Well done Dr Greger, and thank you!




      0



      0
  36. off-topic what’s better for health? Eating one type of grain and pulse in your main meal (e.g one pot soup or stew) or eating multiple types of grains and pulses in your main meal daily? What’s better for your microbiome and absorption of nutrients?




    0



    0
  37. I understand that rice is heavily contaminated with arsenic, but it would be great to have some comparisons to other cancer causing foods. For example, is 1 cup of rice equivalent to a drumstick of fried chicken, in terms of cancer risk? Some comparisons like this would help to put things into perspective.




    1



    0
    1. Whoa, if 1 cup a rice causes 300 cancer cases per million then it’s worse than smoking. Can somebody check my calculations?




      0



      0
      1. Joshua, “if 1 cup a rice causes 300 cancer cases per million”

        It does NOT cause 300 cancer cases. That is potential risk from arsenic but not from the rice. Arsenic in food does not talk about absorption or how much is just detoxed out by the body.

        Long-term consumption of total rice, white rice or brown rice was not associated with risk of developing cancer in US men and women. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26219234




        0



        0
        1. That’s reassuring, but cancer isn’t the only effect of arsenic consumption. It remains unclear to me how the risk of consuming arsenic in rice compares to other risks.




          0



          0
  38. Sounds like for many people, cooking rice like pasta isn’t going to be a big help with lowering As levels. If the water being used is basically an As broth, it could contaminate the rice.




    0



    0
  39. The deep dives are fine with me. But. I’d love to have the practical oriented video(s) in the dive come first. So, if I already am doing what ought to be done with my diet, or, if I’m simply not into details, then I can skip the rest of the dive.




    0



    0

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This