The Effects of Too Much Arsenic in the Diet

The Effects of Too Much Arsenic in the Diet
4.87 (97.33%) 45 votes

Even at low-level exposure, arsenic is not just a class I carcinogen, but may impair our immune function and increase our risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes.

Discuss
Republish

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

When people hear arsenic, they think of it as an acute poison, and indeed, a tiny amount, a hundred milligrams, could kill you in an hour. That’s like the weight of a tenth of a paper clip.  But, there’s also chronic arsenic poisoning, where even a dose 10,000 times as small can be harmful if you’re exposed day after day, for years at a time. Chief among the concerns is cancer.

Arsenic is “classified…as a class I carcinogen”—that’s the highest level, things known to cause cancer in humans, alongside things like asbestos, cigarette smoke, formaldehyde, plutonium, processed meat (consumption of bacon, ham, hot dogs, and lunch meat). So, arsenic is pretty bad stuff, implicated in tens of thousands, or even hundreds of thousands, of cancer cases worldwide every year.

Of course, cancer is just our #2 killer; what about heart disease? “Long-term exposure to low to moderate arsenic levels was [also found] associated with cardiovascular disease incidence and mortality,” meaning heart attacks and strokes.

Arsenic is also considered “an immunotoxicant,” meaning toxic to our immune system. How do we know that? Well, there’s a virus called varicella, which is what causes chickenpox—the first time we get it. Our immune system is able to stamp it down, but not stamp it out. The virus retreats into our nerve cells, where it lies in wait for our immune function to dip. And, when it does, the virus re-emerges, and causes a disease called shingles. We’ve all been exposed to the virus, but only about one in three of us will get shingles, because our immune system is able to keep it at bay. But as we get older or immunosuppressed, the virus can slip its muzzle, like if you’re given arsenic chemotherapy. Shingles is a common side effect, because the arsenic drugs not only kill the cancer, but also some of your immune cells, too. But, that’s at high doses.

Might even low doses of arsenic, like the kind we’re exposed to in our daily diet, impact our immune function? We didn’t know, until this study, in which thousands of Americans had the levels of arsenic in their urine tested, along with their level of antivirus antibodies. And, indeed, the more arsenic they had flowing through their bodies, the lower their defenses.

And, if you’re pregnant, arsenic can pass to your baby, and may not just increase the risk of miscarriage and infant mortality, but “may [also] affect an infant’s immune development, and susceptibility to infections early in life.” But, you don’t know, until you put it to the test.

Infant infections in relation to prenatal arsenic exposure in a study out of New Hampshire; and indeed, the more arsenic the mom was exposed to during pregnancy, the higher risk of infection during infancy—though “[i[t’s unknown whether arsenic-induced” changes in gene expression can impact the health of not only your own children, but your grandchildren as well. Regardless, arsenic exposure isn’t good for mom’s own health—associated with increasing blood pressure.

If arsenic suppresses immune system function, though, then at least, maybe, as a silver lining, you get fewer allergies or something, which is kind of an overreaction of the immune system? Apparently not. Those with higher arsenic levels tend to have higher rates of food allergies, tend to not sleep as well, tend to not feel as well. If you ask people how they would rate their health, those reporting “excellent” or “very good” tended to have lower levels of arsenic, compared to those who just reported “good, fair, or poor.” They tended to have higher levels.

What about diabetes? Here’s two dozen population studies on arsenic exposure and confirmed diabetes. Any result over one suggests increased risk for diabetes. Anything below one suggests lower risk. And, here are the results, suggesting “an association between ingested arsenic and [diabetes].” But, population studies can’t prove cause and effect. While it would be nice to demonstrate a cause-and-effect relationship, is it necessary? Look, we know it’s a carcinogen; we know it causes cancer. What more do we need to take steps to decrease our exposure?

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Icons created by DKHN from The Noun Project.

Image credit: USDA via Flickr. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

When people hear arsenic, they think of it as an acute poison, and indeed, a tiny amount, a hundred milligrams, could kill you in an hour. That’s like the weight of a tenth of a paper clip.  But, there’s also chronic arsenic poisoning, where even a dose 10,000 times as small can be harmful if you’re exposed day after day, for years at a time. Chief among the concerns is cancer.

Arsenic is “classified…as a class I carcinogen”—that’s the highest level, things known to cause cancer in humans, alongside things like asbestos, cigarette smoke, formaldehyde, plutonium, processed meat (consumption of bacon, ham, hot dogs, and lunch meat). So, arsenic is pretty bad stuff, implicated in tens of thousands, or even hundreds of thousands, of cancer cases worldwide every year.

Of course, cancer is just our #2 killer; what about heart disease? “Long-term exposure to low to moderate arsenic levels was [also found] associated with cardiovascular disease incidence and mortality,” meaning heart attacks and strokes.

Arsenic is also considered “an immunotoxicant,” meaning toxic to our immune system. How do we know that? Well, there’s a virus called varicella, which is what causes chickenpox—the first time we get it. Our immune system is able to stamp it down, but not stamp it out. The virus retreats into our nerve cells, where it lies in wait for our immune function to dip. And, when it does, the virus re-emerges, and causes a disease called shingles. We’ve all been exposed to the virus, but only about one in three of us will get shingles, because our immune system is able to keep it at bay. But as we get older or immunosuppressed, the virus can slip its muzzle, like if you’re given arsenic chemotherapy. Shingles is a common side effect, because the arsenic drugs not only kill the cancer, but also some of your immune cells, too. But, that’s at high doses.

Might even low doses of arsenic, like the kind we’re exposed to in our daily diet, impact our immune function? We didn’t know, until this study, in which thousands of Americans had the levels of arsenic in their urine tested, along with their level of antivirus antibodies. And, indeed, the more arsenic they had flowing through their bodies, the lower their defenses.

And, if you’re pregnant, arsenic can pass to your baby, and may not just increase the risk of miscarriage and infant mortality, but “may [also] affect an infant’s immune development, and susceptibility to infections early in life.” But, you don’t know, until you put it to the test.

Infant infections in relation to prenatal arsenic exposure in a study out of New Hampshire; and indeed, the more arsenic the mom was exposed to during pregnancy, the higher risk of infection during infancy—though “[i[t’s unknown whether arsenic-induced” changes in gene expression can impact the health of not only your own children, but your grandchildren as well. Regardless, arsenic exposure isn’t good for mom’s own health—associated with increasing blood pressure.

If arsenic suppresses immune system function, though, then at least, maybe, as a silver lining, you get fewer allergies or something, which is kind of an overreaction of the immune system? Apparently not. Those with higher arsenic levels tend to have higher rates of food allergies, tend to not sleep as well, tend to not feel as well. If you ask people how they would rate their health, those reporting “excellent” or “very good” tended to have lower levels of arsenic, compared to those who just reported “good, fair, or poor.” They tended to have higher levels.

What about diabetes? Here’s two dozen population studies on arsenic exposure and confirmed diabetes. Any result over one suggests increased risk for diabetes. Anything below one suggests lower risk. And, here are the results, suggesting “an association between ingested arsenic and [diabetes].” But, population studies can’t prove cause and effect. While it would be nice to demonstrate a cause-and-effect relationship, is it necessary? Look, we know it’s a carcinogen; we know it causes cancer. What more do we need to take steps to decrease our exposure?

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Icons created by DKHN from The Noun Project.

Image credit: USDA via Flickr. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Doctor's Note

So where is arsenic found in our diet? See my last two videos Where Does the Arsenic in Chicken Come From? and Where Does the Arsenic in Rice, Mushrooms, & Wine Come From?

Next, I take a deep dive into the rice issue:

These will all come up over the next few weeks on NutritionFacts.org, but if you don’t want to wait you can stream them all now by making a donation to the 501c3 nonprofit organization that keeps this site up and running.

131 responses to “The Effects of Too Much Arsenic in the Diet

Commenting Etiquette

The intention of the comment section under each video and blog post is to allow all members to share their stories, questions, and feedback with others in a welcoming, engaging, and respectful environment. Off-topic comments are permitted, in hopes more experienced users may be able to point them to more relevant videos that may answer their questions. Vigorous debate of science is welcome so long as participants can disagree respectfully. Advertising products or services is not permitted.

To make NutritionFacts.org a place where people feel comfortable posting without feeling attacked, we have no tolerance for ad hominem attacks or comments that are racist, misogynist, homophobic, vulgar, or otherwise inappropriate. Please help us to foster a community of mutual respect. Enforcement of these rules is done to the best of our ability on a case-by-case basis.

  1. I remember in 2000, when I got so stressed out over the Presidential election, that I got shingles. I actually thought they were insect bites, until a nurse at work told me it was Shingles. I was about 40 at the time. Now, even though I don’t like Trump, I try not to get so stressed out over it.




    29
    1. I had a similar response during the election when it seemed Mrs. Clinton might win. I was vomiting every morning at the thought. I now feel much healthier and no longer stress of the situation.




      31
      1. When I was facing the same type of physical issues during the election, I did the scientific thing–and voted for my doctor, Jill Stein, M.D. of the Green Party. I felt fine doing so, and sleep well now.




        18
      2. Wondering if your vomiting will return Bill once you wake up and realize that you may be one of the millions who will lose health care under Trump, see the US environment deteriorate at an unprecedented rate and become aware of the fact that those who put the orange pompadour clown in office have made the US the laughing stock of the planet.




        21
  2. Well, I have suffered shingles just this past month and I really dont want to suffer through this again if I can help it. I rarely cook more rice than 1 cup (dry) every three weeks or so, but Consumer Reports says that the 2009 EPA report lists rice in third place (17%) behind fruit (18%) and vegies (24%) for sources of arsenic in our food. Since all I eat is fruit , vegies, whole grain bread, oats, and some beans, this is a little disconcerting. Is there a way to effectively detox from arsenic?
    http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/magazine/2012/11/arsenic-in-your-food/index.htm (The downloadable pdf file lists specific rice products for comparison )




    9
      1. hi John S, yes, agreed, growing our own veg is terrific in that we avoid the fertilizers that can add additional arsenic to the soil. But look what I found John ! A study on DETOXING from arsenic with whole foods! (albeit using rats, but the authors conclude with the hope it translates to humans) The whole food they used happens to be lentils ! Yay ! Good thing I love lentils. The lentils grown in canada seem to have enough selenium to work http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0041008X13002810
        What do you think ?




        5
        1. What about the issue of cross contamination with gluten grains and arsenic? Lentils are often used as a rotation crop in addition to sharing the same shipping and processing equipment.




          0
    1. Hi Guest, Traditional methods of cooking rice (washing until water is clear, the. Cooking in a large volume of water and draining off cooking water) apparently reduce arsenic content by over 50%. There will be more about this subject in upcoming videos, so watch this space! Meanwhile, hope that was helpful.




      7
      1. Thank you Dr Miriam Maisal, I am going to try out this cooking method this weekend. That, in combination with using one of the brands of rice known to be lowest in arsenic should lessen the worry a bit.
        The study posted above using lentils (high in selenium) to help clear arsenic from the body is interesting to me. It reminds me of the indian dish ‘ kitchari’ where lentils and rice are cooked together which I enjoy.
        Brazil nuts of course would be an obvious choice for a whole food solution for selenium, but, some of us follow wfpb aka Dr Esselstyn or Dr Ornish where nuts and seeds are severely limited/prohibited.

        This is a great series of videos even though I cant help feeling quite discouraged along with some of the other posters over the insanity of what’s gone wrong with our food supply. I have a number of dietary restrictions due to health issues and financial pressures… trying to dodge poisons that were purposely PUT THERE is yet another hoop. Thank you again Dr Maisal, Dr Greger and staff for helping us through the mire.




        6
  3. Hi Dr. G!

    Would you mind doing a video on food sensitivity to tyramine? Tyramine is an amino acid found in fermented foods, nuts, seeds, processed meats, chocolate, etc and can cause mild to severe symptoms including heart palpitations, migraine, shortness of breath, and hives to those who have natural or chemically-induced (MAOI drugs) sensitivity to it. After finding out about this, I have made great improvements in my life.

    Keep up the good work!




    3
      1. Moderator,
        Do you know if Dr. Greger has ever discussed adapting the WFPBD to certain conditions such as SBIO? I am confused by things I have read on other sites that discourage a great many of the foods on this diet if you have SBIO, which I received as a possible diagnosis recently.




        1
  4. Is there anything we can do do remove the existing arsenic that has accumulated in our bodies? Also, how can we limit ingesting new arsenic? Are rice and chicken the worst sources? How do other grains compare to rice?




    8
    1. After wednesday’s video I tried to do some digging. I don’t know how people feel about consumer reports, but this is their data on arsenic in grains: http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/magazine/2015/01/how-much-arsenic-is-in-your-rice/index.htm

      Also…Dr. Oz has a video of how Arsenic supposedly flows through our system…I would also like to know if there is any way to have it pulled or if we must just limit exposure: http://www.doctoroz.com/episode/arsenic-apple-juice
      From here, scroll under the initial video and click on the second slide, which is the next 10 minutes of the show. His visualization shows the theory on how arsenic causes cancer and retardation.




      5
      1. I have read from many sources that high fiber helps pull it out over time, and cilantro is apparently particularly good at removing toxins.
        JohNS




        6
    2. This is a great question. Some removal of arsenic occurs through the skin and may be facilitated by exercise-induced sweating (see Arsenic, Cadmium, Lead, and Mercury in Sweat: A Systematic Review, at: https://www.hindawi.com/journals/jeph/2012/184745/. Glutathione also helps with liver detoxification of arsenic, and consuming dietary methyl donors (e.g., B-vitamins) as well as getting enough cruciferous vegetables, carotenoids, and selenium can positively impact the glutathione system in doing so.




      0
    1. All that encouragement is generated by two folks: those who have financial interest, and those who are misguided by those who have financial interests. That’s the long and short of _whatever OILS_ they are pushing on the largely ignorant and unhealthy public this week/month/year.

      Finding this place may be your first step to nutritional enlightenment. Enjoy!




      9
      1. Wade I was shopping for B 12 when I saw your review regarding the powder. I really had some great chuckles. So how much did you end up using? A smidge a week?




        1
        1. Hey thanks for the note. Yes, a dab here and there. I’ll dip a chopstick in the bag and consume what comes out-if it’s not “stacked” on the stick. I MAY yet cut the powder with cornstarch. Previously I’d only thought of cutting it with powdered sugar–but I’m just not “in favor” of sugar any more. Cornstarch seems less “bad” but also is a highly-processed product of likely GMO corn, but it sounds better and won’t be as sticky.

          As I’ve begun dodging the Summer sun and no longer am employed out-of-doors, I should be using the D3 as well-which is similarly dense in the powdered form I have.

          Despite any hassles with the densities of their powders, I yet am happy with the source and product and economy. To really get the best understanding of their effectiveness (and shelf life-as that order of B12 is a lifetime supply) would require regular lab work on my blood and I’m not in a position to pony up for such presently. My MD did recently assure me not to worry of OD’ing on the B12, and I’m sure he’s ordered lots and lots of B12 injections over his long career.




          0
  5. There are so many people stressed out in the youtube comments thread. The comments above are reminders of how damaging stress can be. Dr.McDougall’s older arsenic post is helpful.




    3
  6. Any link between arsenic and congestive heart failure? The wife of a friend now has a bad heart at 50-ish. They routinely “amended” their garden soil with truckloads of chicken waste from the giant chicken factory barns (scattered all over the hills of the South). They ate almost exclusively from this garden (and sold produce from it) and their own meat/milk/poultry products, plus wild game.

    I realize most of the research and this site are focused on the Joe Average Big City/Suburb dweller, but think this case of that devastating development could be related to their meat-centric lifestyle, despite the lack of Super stores and Mega products.




    6
    1. Wade, in case you didn’t see my response to your 2:46 PM comment yesterday, please go back to it (and Patricia’s further down) whenever you get a chance.




      2
          1. I don’t have a clue, caspergomez. All I know about their system is that it’s fairly new. Maybe someone else can answer that question?




            0
        1. Just got this note. I’m hunting for it- was that on previous video?

          Dontcha just love the impossibilities of the Word Press Forum Software! I’ll have to take a few weeks off again…WP seriously fouls up my flow.




          0
    2. hi Wade. I was interested in your question since we’re on well water here, and in selenium deficient zone. The lack of selenium in the soil (and food) can exacerbate the harmful effects of arsenic apparently. I found this link that describes some of the physiological effects of arsenic exposure.
      https://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/csem/csem.asp?csem=1&po=11 There can be effects upon the cardiovascular system with both acute and chronic exposure. Cheers!




      3
    3. Hi Wade: This is Dr. Daniela Sozanski, PhD, PScD and Naturopath in Atlanta, GA, also Moderator for Nutritionfacts.org.
      I am sorry to hear about your friend. Arsenic as you know is a level 1 carcinogenic, but there is more it, as it was shown to cause cardiovascular disease. Please see Dr. Greger’s video on the topic: https://nutritionfacts.org/video/the-effects-of-too-much-arsenic-in-the-diet/, he clearly mentions this aspect.
      One suggestion, there are tests for arsenic and other heavy metal toxicity that can be performed. Once detected in the body, there are also detox treatments.
      In addition, vitamin C is a good chelation agent, so a plant based diet rich in vitamin C may also help.
      I hope this answers your question, regards, Daniela




      1
    4. Hi Wade: This is Dr. Daniela Sozanski, PhD, PScD and Naturopath in Atlanta, GA, also Moderator for Nutritionfacts.org.
      I am sorry to hear about your friend. Arsenic as you know is a level 1 carcinogenic, but there is more it, as it was shown to cause cardiovascular disease. Please see Dr. Greger’s video on the topic: https://nutritionfacts.org/video/the-effects-of-too-much-arsenic-in-the-diet/, he clearly mentions this aspect.
      One suggestion, there are tests for arsenic and other heavy metal toxicity that can be performed. Once detected in the body, there are also detox treatments.
      In addition, vitamin C is a good chelation agent, so a plant based diet rich in vitamin C may also help.
      I hope this answers your question, regards, Daniela




      0
  7. Today video is a good one. The good doctor talks about the danger of arsenic, period, and does not blame on just the chicken.

    On a related manner, strawberries, if not organic, are founded to be loaded with pesticides. Strawberries are more susceptible because of its thin skin and so the pesticides are absorbed inside the meat and washing won’t do any good.

    https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2017/03/10/strawberries-and-these-other-foods-have-most-pesticides/98966374/

    https://www.ewg.org/foodnews/strawberries.php

    https://www.ewg.org/foodnews/dirty_dozen_list.php




    3
  8. Does detox helps reduce toxic load like arsenic? Which practices might reduce that body contamination? How often are recommended?




    0
  9. My organic lawn company uses organic poultry litter as part of its compost. I don’t have a garden, but would the arsenic levels be high even for “organic poultry litter”?




    1
  10. How can we decrease our exposure to arsenic? I don’t think you can. We have already seen from Dr. Greger’s videos that arsenic is found in all of our commercial fertilizers which come from chicken manure and cow manure. And we are told that these manures have high concentration of arsenic from all of the antibiotics that are given these animals. This means that all of our commercial crops are sucking up arsenic into their roots and into their leaves. Even home gardens are contaminated with arsenic. If you go to Lowe’s Warehouse or to WalMart and purchase a bag of fertilizer to put on your garden….guess what…..it has arsenic in it. I don’t think there is any escaping this poison. All we can do is just keep on eating a whole plant food diet and hoping that the phytonutrients from a whole plant food diet will help our body to combat the effects of arsenic in our entire food chain. One ray of hope, is that we do see elderly people living into their 90’s and even going past 100 years who have eaten food all of their life that has been the standard American diet which is full of arsenic. So, if they can do it on the SAD diet, maybe we have a chance of doing it on the whole plant food diet despite the wide spread contamination of our soils, water, air, and food.




    8
    1. The cheapest topsoil sold is mostly sand and sewage sludge….meets the requirements for nitrogen …etc. content.

      My garden now just gets composted tree leaves…no cost and low contamination.




      2
    2. John, there are lots of videos on Youtube talking about using wood chips as garden mulch. From the sound of it, if you have a garden, you don’t need to fertilize it after the first couple of years of using wood chips. Of course, who knows what is in wood chips, that has been sprayed on the trees, especially if they chips are from fruit trees. But at least it wouldn’t be manure from chickens that have arsenic in their poop.




      1
  11. What about vitamin B17 in apricot seeds… it has levels of arsenic, which is why I assume cancer patients would use this as a supplement? Good or bad? based on this video, should it not be taken regularly fro “healthy” individuals. The bag does give warning and says to only take about 2-4 daily. Would this not be recommended?




    1
    1. Hi Kristine. I am a volunteer moderator. There is no ‘Vitamin B17’; this is a misnomer for a naturally occurring chemical compound called amygdalin or laetrile. Laetrile has been shown to be clinically ineffective to cure cancer. Please read this article on PubMed.




      0
    1. Good video. In the 1970s, they hide behind the saturated fat scare to make people eat sugar and harmful hydrogenated vegetable oil and transfat instead. How much money was spent on statin drug to lower the so called cholesterol scare which made big pharma billions of dollars.




      1
  12. how much can a registered nutritionist be involved in curing patients from diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular, diabetes, nephrology… in other words, to what extinct can a RN be trusted to be a source of treatment to patients to diet. Dr. Greger has so much medicinal background, that’s why he is able to provide this much information and treatments through nutrition, but can a RD do the same?
    What do we still need in order for nutritional science to play a major role in medicine?




    0
  13. how much can a registered nutritionist be involved in curing patients from diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular, diabetes, nephrology… in other words, to what extinct can a RN be trusted to be a source of treatment to patients to diet. Dr. Greger has so much medicinal background, that’s why he is able to provide this much information and treatments through nutrition, but can a RD do the same?
    What do we still need in order for nutritional science to play a major role in medicine?//




    0
    1. Hi Jana,Thanks for your question. I am one of the volunteer moderators at the website. Firstly, I think you are wise to check Dr Greger for the best information in clinical nutrition. As his videos and blogs are based on scientific evidence. As for your question about Registered Dietitian or Nutritionist since I am a dietitian I can say that it is very comprehensive training that we go through in the area of nutrition, clinical nutritional therapy, biochemistry, physiology and food science to name a few. However, Dietitians are to get referral from a doctor for seeing a patient to provide clinical nutritional therapy plan. In my experience when the medical team work together it is the best option. Dr Greger is exceptionaly knowledgeable in nutrition field as he has dedicate his time towards this mission of informing us all to empower ourselves. If you are interested to learn more about different topics that he covers he has digital downloads that you can look into it. I hope this information is useful to you.
      Digital Downloads




      4
  14. Talk about “stress”. I’d like to see Dr Gregor and Dr Mercola slug it out on “fat” since they are totally opposite. Many other doc’s support the value of
    saturated fat also. As usual I’m stuck in the middle. I don’t necessarily think Dr Gregor is correct. They all have studies to support there agenda.

    Just when I thought mushrooms were a super healthy food from reading other sites , now I can’t eat them because of arsenic..

    Please post a list of “safe” foods we can eat. I’ve given up all sugar and processed foods and red meat, just very small portions of chicken (2 oz)but even
    that is no good and then there’s fish………..What can I eat???
    Sure wish I could get answers and wish I knew how to find them after I click to post this. Yes I’m stress and even depressed about the differing opinions.
    Dr Gregor and Dr Mercola need to talk about these topics instead of having a friendly chat like they did awhile ago.

    Frank Rocap




    5
    1. The Environmental Working Group (EWG.org) has a list of “safe” foods. Not sure what they check for but they are champions of the environment and trying to do what the EPA won’t do.




      0
    2. I feel the same way. Every food I’ve eaten and thought was ok is on the chopping block. Something one guy told me was whenever we try to exploit our resources it bites us in the butt. The more I think about that the more sense it makes. Farms and livestock are exploiting our animals and resources and give nothing back. Grass fed cows and composted organic stuff is probably pretty good for us. But when we just take and try to cheat nature it usually don’t work out so good.

      It’s no wonder why people give up on trying to be healthier. Sorting out the political agenda from fact is difficult at best.

      I’ve enjoyed many of Dr. Gs post and love the site, and I know my green smoothies have drastically helped my health, at least in the short term.

      We know beyond a shadow of a doubt that big corporations will lie and hide truth to make a profit and can’t be trusted. For instance a personal favorite I’ve grown up eating is ranch style beans. Just happens to look at the label last year and notice they still use hydrogenated oil in it. I wrote the company telling them how disappointed I was as my family could no longer eat them. However they are not even responding to it. .




      6
      1. Thank you for your thoughts. I agree with much of what you say. I checked EWG as suggested by a previous reply for safe food and they are recommending chicken and eggs for protein, had to laugh because that’s certainly not in line with Dr Gregor’s recommendations. I’ve followed EWG before and find there recommendations helpful.




        0
        1. Hey Frank.

          I will look into EWG too. My thoughts on fats (I’m not an expert or a admin here) but I think fats are ok for us we just get too much. Have you ever ground up walnuts or any other seed or nut? They are high in fat but when ground up you barely see any fat. The American diet covers everything in fat, and all the contents are fat and or fat and sugar, then they boil it in fat, and wonder why we have clogged arteries. I’m guessing coconut oil is great for outside the body, and if we’re a small part of our diet alone might be ok. But we are consumed with adding fat and not just a little, a lot to everything. And I’ve seen enough of heart disease in coconut growing parts of the world like Polynesia. So I’m skeptical on that one.

          One day I was making toast and was using coconut oil instead of butter or margarine and I used the tiniest amount of oil, thinking to myself that should be good. Then I thought omg if that was butter we wouldn’t have thought twice about covering it in butter large pat of butter or margarine. I think Our perception of fat is skewed.




          1
    3. I feel stressed about this too. It’s easy to get wrapped up in negativity on this topic. Arsenic in this, lead in that, what’s in our water, what are the pipes made up of etc… How do you get out of this negativity? It’s overwhelming sometimes.




      0
      1. Best you can do is lean toward the positive side? No one can avoid all toxins…but it is wise to try to avoid most. No one can eat nothing but perfect foods….though some on here apparently try.

        It’s the people who give up and go sarcastic like a teeny-bopper that pay the price. It’s easy to go sarcastic and negative…but try to remember…nobody probably gives a damn. You are playing a social game and you only hurt yourself. Stay with the facts?




        2
    4. hi Frank Rocap, yesterday’s blog post may interest you https://nutritionfacts.org/2017/07/20/how-to-treat-the-root-cause-of-diabetes/ About halfway down the comments page, NF moderator Darchiterd posts a quote from Dr Garth Davis who says that “when we eat meat, the saturated fat causes the endotoxin to be absorbed, and thereby causing our immune system sets off a state of inflammation”. The are many other points made in the lengthy post, as well as Dr Greger’s article.. all well worth reading. Check out the videos below for more information.
      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/mediterranean-diet-and-atherosclerosis/ speaks about saturated fat and other fats in the diet, https://nutritionfacts.org/video/fatty-meals-may-impair-artery-function/




      4
    5. saturated fat is harmless. Transfat is bad. PUFA and Omega-6 fats are harmful if consumed in large quantity because they cause inflammation. How many times do I have to repeat this before it sinks in people head?




      0
      1. Sorry Jerry Lewis but you appear to be parroting misleading claims you have found on the internet and in highly sensational popular “health” books. You can make as many assertions as you like as often as you like and as loudly as you like. That does not make those assertions true. What does the totlaity of the evidence show?

        Contrary to your opinion, the global scientific community is quite clear that consuming large amounts of dietary saturated fat is unhealthy whatever authors of sensational “health” books and academics with dairy and meat industry ties or links to the Atkins Diet empire may claim, eg
        http://www.bmj.com/content/355/bmj.i5796?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign_name=201611330&utm_source=etoc_weekly
        http://foris.fao.org/preview/25553-0ece4cb94ac52f9a25af77ca5cfba7a8c.pdf
        http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/early/2017/06/15/CIR.0000000000000510

        In fact, Dr Greger has done a video or two on this subject eg
        https://nutritionfacts.org/?fwp_search=saturated+FAT&fwp_content_type=video

        Researchers have also identified a number of the mechanisms by which high saturated fat consumption damages human health eg
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2878127/table/T1/
        http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/07/150714112424.htm
        http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/07/100713011053.htm
        http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/04/150427101527.htm
        http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/09/150903131408.htm
        https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/04/150427101527.htm




        8
        1. You are exactly right Tom.

          Glad to see you are posting again.

          You have a real talent for getting

          right to the point with scientific evidence.

          Keep us on the straight and narrow path of truth.




          5
    6. Hi Frank and thank you for voicing your concerns. With all this information and so many doctors debating it, I can understand that you’re feeling overwhelmed. The thing is that Dr. Greger and Dr. Mercola do not disagree on everything, only some issues. The key to their opinions likely lies in their methods of analysis. Dr. Greger tends to have rather strict criteria as to what he accepts as real evidence. This is pretty much limited to peer-reviewed published studies in well respected journals that come from unbiased sources. He does not accept anecdotal or empirical data as evidence as there is too high a probability that it is false. An example of this is your concern about saturated fats. I’ll use coconut oil as an example since it seems to make headlines quite often. Controlled studies regarding coconut oil in humans don’t bode well, but are not 100% conclusive, yet, that coconut oil intake increases the risk for disease or early death. Dr. Greger reviews them in this video: https://nutritionfacts.org/video/does-coconut-oil-clog-arteries/

      The problem is that until a respected researcher publishes a peer-reviewed controlled clinical trial that focuses on coconut oil intake vs. death and disease, we really won’t know for sure. If you follow Dr. Greger’s advice, by avoiding all saturated fats including coconut oil, but he turns out to be wrong, you probably wouldn’t miss out on anything as there are plenty of healthy antioxidants and fats in the whole food plant based diet that he recommends, but if you follow Dr. Mercola’s advice, and eat coconut oil, and he turns out to be wrong, things may not turn out so well for you.

      As far as a list of “safe” foods, it’s actually pretty simple. Just think “whole food plant based” and “farm to mouth”. If it comes from the plant to you, without any processing in between, you’re probably ok. If it comes in a jar or a can, “just say no.” If it comes in a package, be careful, and make sure it only has one ingredient like “raisins.” Of course it would be nice to eat everything organic and non-GMO, but when that is not possible, you can browse the USDA website to find fruits and veggies that have the lowest amounts of pesticide residue: https://apps.ams.usda.gov/pdp

      As far as enjoyment goes, our whole family eats nothing but whole food plant based, but we all have our different styles. I eat nothing but fruit most of the time. My son eats mostly big bowls of beans, corn, and tomatoes. My daughter eats mostly stir fried veggies (without added oil). We all love what we eat, feel great, maintain our healthy body weight and don’t miss animal products at all.

      Thanks for reading!
      Dr. Ben




      4
      1. Mercola is a money grubbing individual who

        sells worthless pills, tanning machines that

        are bad for your skin, and exercise machines

        that can shake your organs loose from connective

        tissues. Mercola just uses health issues as a

        way to amass wealth beyond our imagination.

        Have you ever seen his home on the internet?

        It looks like some kind of castle owned by

        Queen Elizabeth of England. He has other people

        to write his articles and do all the work. Yeah,

        I read his articles, but be very wary of this

        snake oil salesman.




        0
      2. Hi Ben, i love your response. So much clarity. You mention if it’s in a can or bottle just say no. Does that include canned beans or no added sugar or salt nut butters?




        0
        1. Thank you Raquels. Yes, best to avoid canned beans and nut butters. Cans typically have BPA (or B/C/D/etc) in their linings and sodium added, while peer-reviewed published studies demonstrate that the overwhelming health benefits of nut ingestion is not seen with nut butters.

          Thanks for reading!
          Dr. Ben




          0
          1. Dr. Ben, I hope you will answer my question as well.  Perhaps you didn’t see my earlier request.  I am intrigued by the fact that your diet consists almost entirely of fruit.  Would you consider outlining what a typical day’s meal plan is for you?  You must live somewhere that fresh fruit is available to you year-round which is not the case here in the Midwest.
            Thanks,Lee




            0
              1. Aloha Lida. Yes, I live in Hawaii where we do have amazing fresh fruit year round, but much of what I eat is imported from either the mainland or foreign countries, and is also available year round. In addition, our local Costco has 3 pound bags of organic imported frozen fruit that I eat often as well (cherries, berries, mango, etc.) The best of the best has to be frozen bananas run through a Champion juicer that is configured to make “ice cream”. The resultant banana “ice cream” tastes better than the real thing. Frozen pineapple or cherry “ice cream” are amazing as well. Dr.
                Greger discusses the published benefits of frozen fruit in this video: https://nutritionfacts.org/video/is-canned-fruit-as-healthy/

                My typical day might consist of bananas, apples and oranges for breakfast.
                Watermelon for lunch, and then bananas, golden melon, tomatoes and bell peppers for dinner. As I swim, elliptical and weight train, I also eat about 3 small bags per day of the organic frozen edamame that Costco sells, for the protein content, although there is really no clinical evidence that I need this.

                Casper, I’m a moderator here on NF that assists Dr. Greger with questions on the forum.

                Thanks for reading!
                Dr. Ben




                0
          2. I am highly skeptical of a fruitarian diet, or one nearly so limited. I tried it decades ago, ultimately suffering some wasting then, and saw others so fanatical about it that they did not even acknowledge their own emaciation. I think any promotion of it should be backed by some real science and empirical evidence – and I do mean long term. With the volume of charges of danger for so many foods, I begin to wonder if these reports are cherry picked segments of science chosen with a biased agenda, perhaps even discarding credible rebuttal or counter claims. By the time you consider heavy metals, goiterogens (even in some fruits), oxylic acid, lectins – who knows where it ends – about the only food I haven’t found disparaged is carrots, but I don’t think you can live off of carrots alone.

            By the way, the fruit that we know is not a natural food. Humans have bred what we eat now to our own taste – primary for more sugars. You would not find naturally evolved fruit so palatable or abundant, although it might be more nutritious. Whether even that would be nutritious enough for subsistence would need to be demonstrated in study. Not claiming to be an expert, I know of no primitive society that lives, or lived, on fruit primarily or alone. If you do know of such, that would be useful information. But mostly, I would hope that you would be responsible in promoting a diet that ON THE WHOLE is supported with overwhelming evidence that it is a sustainable diet for health and longevity. Cobbling together a choice of studies is instructive, but taken together does not provide enough to prescribe a diet, without some evidence of long term, consistent dietary maintenance and outcomes. Dr. Greger does illuminate some of that, but I have yet to see specific dietary outlines and histories of such human cultures. Still, I am intrigued and will continue to read and view the valuable information provided here, with great appreciation.




            1
            1. What are you even responding to??

              It’s ridiculous.

              Dr. Fuhrman’s entire program is based on scientific evidence, so what are you even talking about? LoL

              And who is recommending mostly fruit?

              Maybe I missed your precious debates against some others on this board, but if you’re coming out of left-field to be anti-Fuhrman or anti-Fruit, then you need to back up the nonsense what you’re spewing.

              Just because Fuhrman is hard for YOU to follow doesn’t mean it’s not one of the superior diets for the body.

              Plus, our anatomy is closest to a mix of Frugivore and Herbivore. Do you care to debate that? Let’s do it. What do you think humans are designed consume?




              0
            2. Iwulff, I cannot think of any compelling reason to be fanatical about a frugivore diet, even if our closest genetic relative at (96% of DNA conserved), the Chimpanzee, is a strict (98%) frugivore. It works for me because I eat a lot and tend to gain weight (fat) if I eat a lot of WFPB starch or nuts. The fruit makes it easy to maintain my healthy weight. If you’re getting emaciated, then you’re probably just not eating enough.

              Keep in mind that humans have been breeding fruits and veggies for thousands of years. Corn is the prime example, as bred by the native Amerindians starting thousands of years ago, while our current rates of western death and disease is a relatively recent phenomenon. In addition, many fruits and veggies cannot be bred by normal means. A prime example is mango which is not “true to seed.” Any really large creamy mango that you may eat has been grafted, but the seeds from this mango will usually sprout a generic “common mango” that is small and fibrous. We have these growing wild all over Hawaii, but the fruit is still very sweet, regardless of breeding. Then there is the strawberry. “Back in the day” before factory farms, strawberries could be found locally that were super sweet but would not transport to market well and did not suit the needs of the factory farms. After extensive breeding, we now have monster strawberries that can be transported over long distances and still maintain their color and freshness, but are not nearly as sweet as the old “home grown” variety.
              Don’t forget, that processed sugar is the hazard, while the sugars found in fruit that are associated with fiber act in a completely different manner physiologically. In my opinion, there is adequate clinical evidence that a WFPB lifestyle will reduce disease and early death. The only other choice is SAD which, again in my opinion, has been adequately demonstrated in clinical studies to significantly increase disease and early death. We have to something, so I choose WFPB.

              Thanks for reading, Dr. Ben




              2
              1. Ben, do you eat any animal?

                Can you provide a sample list if your daily food intake?

                Which starches are making you gain weight?

                Are you exceeding your calorie break-even point?

                Seems odd.




                0
                1. Aloha Casper: Please see the previous answer for daily food intake. I do not eat animal products except for every other weekend I’ll have a few pieces of salmon sushi during one meal. I can easily gain weight eating my favorite combo of steamed quinoa, baked sweet potato and edamame. I also like dry roasted unsalted peanuts and avocado which I gain weight from.
                  Exceeding my calorie break-even point is no problem for me.

                  Thanks for reading!
                  Dr. Ben




                  0
                  1. Quinoa, sweet potato, and edamame make you gain wait? I’m sorry, no disrespect, but that is the most unique dietary anomaly I’ve ever heard in my life. I’d love to see understand how that’s biologically possible.

                    Also, how much do you weigh, and how do you easily exceed your caloric intake eating mostly fruits? Do you eat more than 20 fruits per day?




                    0
                    1. In the patients I see, its not terribly unique. I’m 5’6″ 144 lbs. I’m a small frame so it could be residual leptin resistance secondary to metabolic syndrome. I’ve been meaning to test my insulin levels but have not had the time. I simply enjoy eating too much. I’m going to try to lose another 10 lbs and see if that helps to resolve my suspected leptin resistance. 20 fruits could be 20 grapes or 20 watermelons. Suffice it to say that my caloric intake exceeds my caloric expenditures if I’m not careful.

                      Thanks for reading…
                      Dr. Ben




                      0
                    2. “Its all about the aesthetics”….just kidding. When I’m not trying to reduce my weight, I’ll eat about 1800-2500 calories per day of nothing but: oranges, bananas, watermelon, honeydew, blueberries, cherries, mango, papaya, pineapple, apple….and a few Costco bags of organic edamame. When I am “cutting” (weight reduction), I’ll eat 500-900 calories per day of the above, but I’ll still eat 2-3 bags (158 calories each) of edamame to reduce lean body mass loss. The amazing part is how easy this weight loss is compared to trying to reduce caloric intake eating the SAD as I had no will-power. I think its related to leptin resistance…just a hunch.

                      Thanks for reading…
                      Dr. Ben




                      1
                    3. Tks for sharing. Really interested in finding out if you find out if Leptin Resistance is your issue.

                      I’ve also always been surprised that some people can run mainly on fruits for years without an adverse effects.

                      How long have you been doing this?




                      0
                    4. Several years now, but not that strict as I’d eat bean/rice/veggies. I feel great. No complaints.




                      0
              2. Mahalo, Dr. Ben for your thorough response to me and others concerning your eating plan.  One question remains, do you find it necessary to take any vitamins and supplements?  If so, which do you take that your eating plan may be lacking?
                Cheers,Lee




                0
                1. Aloha Lee. The only routine supplementation I do is with B12 as my serum B12 levels, when tested, come in below normal as a vegan. I occasionally supplement with D3 when my serum D3 tests come back low, but most of the time I get adequate D from timed daily sun exposure. Other than that I’m very much against supplementation as many clinical studies have shown an increase in disease and early death in patients indiscriminately using vitamins, as well as the fact that many supplements, when tested, do not contain what they say they do.

                  Thanks for reading…
                  Dr. Ben




                  0
              3. Ben,

                Ninety-eight percent fruit would be higher than that reported by authorities I have seen. To be clear, chimpanzees do eat also nuts, seeds, leaves, insects and yes, even meat, though rarely, as reported by Jane Goodall over three decades ago. I appreciate your personal account, but we should be more interested in population studies. Personally, my own diet is about 95% WFPB (My fruitarian stint was brief, as a teenager) . I don’t perform well at 100% WFPB. Maybe someday I will experiment by replacing fish with insects, but I’ll skip eating feces and dirt (in reference to a report about Vitamin B-12 by Dr. Greger). I do, however, find it difficult to navigate the plethora of warnings about what to not eat, which taken together, as I said, seem to exclude nearly all food – except carrots.

                Be well.

                https://janegoodall.ca/our-stories/10-things-chimpanzees-eat/ http://www-bcf.usc.edu/~stanford/chimphunt.html




                0
  15. Was reading this study, and wondered why they feel as if total Arsenic is highest in open leaf veggies like kale and spinach? Of course it was in the U.K., but how likely is it to be different here.

    Vegetables categorised as open leaf e.g. kale, chard, lettuce, greens and spinach had the highest concentrations of total arsenic and cadmium (possibly due to soil contamination on the leaves).
    Levels of total arsenic in potatoes, swedes and carrots were lower when peeled. However, there was no notable difference between the levels of total arsenic found in peeled and unpeeled apples, beetroots, courgettes, cucumbers, parsnips and squashes.
    Levels of cadmium and lead in potatoes and swedes were lower when peeled.”

    https://www.food.gov.uk/science/research/chemical-safety-research/env-cont/fs241003




    1
  16. I have been eating mushrooms regularly as part of a plant-based diet. Are two mushrooms a day, too many? Do you have recommendations as to which mushrooms are safest? Will Dr Gregor be providing more insight on arsenic specifically in mushrooms? Thank you in advance!




    3
  17. After seeing your report on arsenic in chickens and manure, it seems the only escape from it is from produce grown on virgin soil (good luck). I began to think about testing for exposure (especially since I each brown rice daily – and yes, some fish), but since arsenic is also removed from the body, and there are organic and inorganic forms I am left to wonder what to test, and what results would mean. Should I test hair, blood or urine? Does evidence of arsenic in either, simply reflect the consequence of routine healthy removal? Does testing offer any indication of what remains in the cells? Does testing distinguish organic from inorganic? And how dangerous is organic arsenic, seems to be in debate. So, while I understand I should avoid it as much as possible, as with many things, to avoid completely would be to probably starve or suffer malnutrition anyway. How then, can dangerous levels be determined, and how can one determine whether or not one has entered into that range?




    1
    1. Ian, since I began a whole foods plant based diet 5 months ago I was having one or two servings of organic brown rice a day. I started to get some weird problems that may be due to over consumption of rice and possible arsenic contamination — I think there is a consumer warning that you should only have one or two servings A WEEK.




      1
  18. Arsenic, lead , mercury etc can be chelated out of the body with greens like arugula (rocket ) , watercress, cilantro ( coriander ) or as cold pressed seed oils nigella sativa ( Black cumin ), coriander etc. Coriander transports metal toxins through the blood brain barrier too which is unusual and boosts the immune system. More info can be found on Ian Clark’s activation products.com website on these oils et al.




    2
  19. Guys-this information is to inform us not just on how to choose the least risky and most powerful foods for ourselves, but to also understand how the current food industry is effecting literally everyone. Just because arsenic consentrates in this or that, doesn’t mean we should obsess over every billionth part of a mal-nutrient. These videos further illustrate that a VARRIED diet is so very important, and knowing where your food comes from in this incredibly commercialized world is still important, even if It is a plant and “organic.” As Americans (sorry those who are from other countries in this site) it is imperative that we keep our eyes open to legislation or lack there of surrounding our food…or apparently poisonous antibiotics going into our livestock (when was the last time the chickens’ IQ have been tested?). We shouldn’t be scared there is arsenic in a bunch of vegetables- we should be majorly PEEVED that it’s been introduced into our environment over and over again by synthetic means. Dr Gregor has NOT said “do not eat rice, mushrooms, wine…etc.” Arsenic is a scary word but there are still major benefits to eating a balanced and varried diet, AND VIDEOS WILL COME SHOWING HOW TO LOWER OVERALL ARSENIC IN YHE DIET SOON. hang in there and don’t have an aneurism.




    4
  20. Dr. Greger’s info site is the greatest! Regarding arsenic, it’s not hard to see how we can accumulate it in our bodies. Can we please ask Dr. Greger to tell us what the best effective ways/foods for eliminating it are? That is such an important issue and some of us who may have possible symptoms of contamination very much need to have a nutritional program to detoxify. Thanks so much.




    2
    1. Hi Wendy,

      Thanks for your question.

      Dr. Greger will be coming out with more arsenic videos in the coming weeks, which may offer some explanation for how to keep arsenic levels low in the body. Make sure to stay tuned for those videos, and subscribe to receive email updates for when videos come out if you would like!




      0
      1. If Arsenic poisoning is such a big problem,

        why don’t we see billions of Asians becoming

        debilitated and even dying in mass over in

        China from eating rice 3 times a day since

        childhood? Or, why don’t we see all of those

        Americans who live in Louisiana becoming

        real sick from eating Louisiana rice constantly

        all the days of their lives? If arsenic is such a

        problem debilitating our “whole plant food”

        diet lives then how is it that millions and millions

        of people living in Mexico, Central America,

        and South America eat rice daily for their

        entire lives? I think Dr. Greger just like to

        scare people, because he never really gives

        a solution. Just like the time he scared everyone

        about Avocados in one video showing how

        avocados can SHRED the cells in your body.

        Some people just get a kick out of scaring

        other people.




        1
  21. Great video. Wonderfully helpful in so many ways. Whilst is appears very obvious that arsenic should be eliminated all round just like the Doc says, I do hope that there is further investigation into connections between arsenic and diabetes esp for those diligent diabetes out there who haven’t found obvious rewards in diet and lifestyle changes. It could answer some questions for those people and perhaps give them some degree of flexibility in their life: get rid of arsenic, and these people may be able to have a bit more fruit down the track perhaps?




    0
  22. In chile breast cancer went down by 70% when arsenic levels were 80 times normal in their drinking water , arsenic is also sometimes used by vets to treat kidney problems in animals . I recall years ago getting arsenic from a vet to treat a horse , the horse went from near dead to secartariet in one day.
    in 2017 you can find anything on the internet.




    2
  23. what about the arsenic levels in almonds? we all know that almonds are healthy. is there some recommended cap on daily almond eating? my understanding is that the bitterness in some almonds is the arsenic. fact or fiction?




    0
  24. Hi there,

    I am a volunteer for Dr. Greger. Thanks for your question. Nuts don’t seem to usually have very high amounts of arsenic in them, and almonds are no different. All foods, essentially, have trace amounts of arsenic. Arsenic is actually considered an essential nutrient that our body needs, so trace amounts may actually be a good thing. As far as the bitterness goes, that is not caused by arsenic, but rather by the content of cyanogenic diglucoside amygdalin present in the almond.

    I hope that helps answer your question!




    0
  25. We cook a mix of white (50 lbs) and brown rice (25 lbs). Good? BTW My doctor has me on a restricted potassium diet. I’m 75 yrs old but going strong. I see some contradicting data on low and high potassium foods. Your book doesn’t have any advice on age-caused kidney problems. Please advise. Thank you.




    0
    1. Hi Alfredo!
      Dr Greger has since uploaded a new video which you may have seen. It goes in to the best sources of rice with lowest arsenic, depending on where you live. There’s also another one on how to cook rice, which might also help with preparing your rice.
      As for your kidney problems, hope you are doing well. Here is a video which covers kidney disease and how vegan, low protein diets can be good at slowing kidney decline.

      Hope all this helps :)




      0
  26. Wow, cannot wait to hear the response to this Potassium-restricted comment!

    I’ve never heard of anyone getting too much potassium… it’s always the opposite.

    How many mg is he limiting you to?




    0
      1. Oh, I see. Thanks for pointing that out!

        Alfredo, have you been diagnosed with CKD?

        If ya don’t know, Dr. Greger recommends Dr. Michael Klaper for consultations… it may be worth a second opinion on the severity of your kidney damage, and best dietary route to take including your questions about Potassium, et al?

        I know Dr. K does Skype sessions if interested … http://doctorklaper.com/contact




        0
  27. Any data available on the amount of arsenic in a Quaker rice cake? My usual breakfast: rice cake topped with peanut butter, grated tumeric + pepper, ground flax seed & sliced banana.




    0
    1. Patricia,

      That’s an interesting healthy bunch of toppings to put on a Quaker rice cake :)

      Have you ever tried that blend atop a slice of toasted Ezekiel bread?




      1
  28. We have a high level of arsenic in our well water, and have installed a point-of-use arsenic removal system for our drinking and cooking water. The rest of the well water (bathroom, outdoor faucets) is not treated to remove arsenic. Are there any studies regarding how safe it is to use this water for gardening? Thanks!




    0

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This