Arsenic in Infant Rice Cereal

Arsenic in Infant Rice Cereal
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Pediatric nutrition authorities have recommended that when it comes to rice and rice-based products, arsenic intake should be as low as possible.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

“The US Food and Drug Administration…has been monitoring the arsenic content in foods [for decades],” yet “[d]espite [the] well-established science describing the health risks associated with arsenic exposure, no standards have been set limiting the amount of arsenic allowable in foods [in the United States].”

“[I]n 2001, the [EPA] adopted a new, stricter standard for arsenic in drinking water.” In 2013, the FDA proposed a legal limit for apple juice; yet, “[t]here are [still] no standards for arsenic in food [products] despite the fact that food sources are [our] main source of exposure.”

China has standards. As of 2014, China set “a maximum threshold of 150” parts per billion—stricter than the World Health Organization limit of 200. In the U.S., a 200 limit wouldn’t change the cancer risk much. Now, at 150, if we had China’s safety limits, that would help reduce cancer risk up to 23%, or even 47% at a limit of 100, but that could seriously affect the rice industry. In other words, U.S. rice is so contaminated with arsenic, if you set a safety standard that really cut down on cancer risk, it “would wipe out the U.S. rice market.” But, with no limits, what’s the incentive for the rice industry to change its practices? Setting arsenic limits would not only directly protect consumers, but also encourage the industry to stop planting rice paddies on arsenic-contaminated land.

But, those cancer estimates are based on arsenic-contaminated water studies. Maybe the arsenic in rice somehow has a different effect? You don’t know, until you put it to the test. Yes, rice has lots of toxic arsenic that urine studies show we absorb into our body, but, to date, there weren’t any studies “that demonstrate[d]…deleterious health impacts [specifically of] rice arsenic”—until this study.

They figured, hey, arsenic causes bladder cancer; so, let’s just see what kind of DNA mutations the urine of rice-eaters can have on human bladder cells growing in a petri dish. And indeed, they clearly demonstrated that eating lots of arsenic-contaminated rice every day can “give rise to significant amounts of genetic damage”—the kind that‘s associated with cancer. Yeah, but they used pretty contaminated rice. Only about 10 percent of the rice in certain parts of Asia might ever reach those levels, though a quarter in parts of Europe might, and over half in the U.S., making for “considerable” public health implications.

So, “[t]here remains little mystery surrounding the health risks associated with arsenic levels in rice. The remaining mystery is why long-overdue standards for arsenic levels in rice have not been set [in the United States].” But, that may be changing. Last year, the FDA proposed setting a limit on toxic arsenic—at least “in infant rice cereal.”

Infants and children under four average the highest rice intake, in part because they eat like three times the amount of food in relation to their body size. So, there’s an especially “urgent need for regulatory limits” on toxic arsenic in baby food.

Pediatric nutrition authorities have recommended that when it comes to “rice and rice-based products,…[a]rsenic intake should be as low as possible.” And, hey, how about as early as possible? “Approximately 90% of pregnant women eat rice,” which may end up having “adverse health effects” on the baby.

You can estimate how much rice the mom ate while pregnant by analyzing arsenic levels in infant toenail clippings. “Specifically, an increase of 1/4 cup of rice per day was associated with [about a 17%] increase in infant toenail” arsenic, indicating that rice arsenic can be passed along to the fetus. What might that much arsenic do? A quarter-cup of rice’s worth of arsenic has been associated with things like “low birth weight,…increased respiratory…infections,” and above that, “a 5-6 point reduction in IQ.” So, “based on the FDA’s findings, it would be prudent for pregnant women to consume a variety of foods, including varied grains”—which is all code for “cut down on rice.” Saying “eat less” of anything, after all, is bad for business.

Then, once the baby is weaning, “what’s a parent to do? To reduce arsenic risks, [Consumer Reports] recommend[s] that babies [average] no more than [a] serving of infant rice cereal a day,” relying on other grains instead, which are much less contaminated. As the American Academy of Pediatrics has emphasized, “there is no demonstrated benefit of rice cereal over…other grains, such as oat[s and] barley,…all of which have lower arsenic levels than rice cereal.” Reducing consumption of infant rice cereal to just two servings per week could have an even more dramatic effect on reducing risk.

The proposed limit on toxic arsenic in infant rice cereals would end up removing about half off the shelves. The FDA recently analyzed more than 500 infant and toddler foods, and the highest levels of toxic arsenic were found in organic brown rice cereals and toddler puffs. Based on the wording, though I can’t confirm it, they appear to be this brand. Not-so-happy baby if they suffer brain damage, or grow up to get cancer. A single serving could expose infants to twice the tolerable arsenic intake set by the EPA for water. I contacted the Happy Baby company, and was told that they were “not able to provide any comments on [the FDA’s] results.”

“Eliminating all rice and rice products from the diets of infants and [small] children up to 6 years old could reduce the lifetime cancer risk:  6% lower chance of developing lung or bladder cancer” later in life if infants stopped; 23% lower chance if young kids stopped. But, switching to other grains is a move described as “drastic and dramatic,” creating a “huge crisis”—for the rice industry presumably—and therefore, evidently, “not feasible at all.”

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Scott Anderson via Flickr. Image has been modified.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

“The US Food and Drug Administration…has been monitoring the arsenic content in foods [for decades],” yet “[d]espite [the] well-established science describing the health risks associated with arsenic exposure, no standards have been set limiting the amount of arsenic allowable in foods [in the United States].”

“[I]n 2001, the [EPA] adopted a new, stricter standard for arsenic in drinking water.” In 2013, the FDA proposed a legal limit for apple juice; yet, “[t]here are [still] no standards for arsenic in food [products] despite the fact that food sources are [our] main source of exposure.”

China has standards. As of 2014, China set “a maximum threshold of 150” parts per billion—stricter than the World Health Organization limit of 200. In the U.S., a 200 limit wouldn’t change the cancer risk much. Now, at 150, if we had China’s safety limits, that would help reduce cancer risk up to 23%, or even 47% at a limit of 100, but that could seriously affect the rice industry. In other words, U.S. rice is so contaminated with arsenic, if you set a safety standard that really cut down on cancer risk, it “would wipe out the U.S. rice market.” But, with no limits, what’s the incentive for the rice industry to change its practices? Setting arsenic limits would not only directly protect consumers, but also encourage the industry to stop planting rice paddies on arsenic-contaminated land.

But, those cancer estimates are based on arsenic-contaminated water studies. Maybe the arsenic in rice somehow has a different effect? You don’t know, until you put it to the test. Yes, rice has lots of toxic arsenic that urine studies show we absorb into our body, but, to date, there weren’t any studies “that demonstrate[d]…deleterious health impacts [specifically of] rice arsenic”—until this study.

They figured, hey, arsenic causes bladder cancer; so, let’s just see what kind of DNA mutations the urine of rice-eaters can have on human bladder cells growing in a petri dish. And indeed, they clearly demonstrated that eating lots of arsenic-contaminated rice every day can “give rise to significant amounts of genetic damage”—the kind that‘s associated with cancer. Yeah, but they used pretty contaminated rice. Only about 10 percent of the rice in certain parts of Asia might ever reach those levels, though a quarter in parts of Europe might, and over half in the U.S., making for “considerable” public health implications.

So, “[t]here remains little mystery surrounding the health risks associated with arsenic levels in rice. The remaining mystery is why long-overdue standards for arsenic levels in rice have not been set [in the United States].” But, that may be changing. Last year, the FDA proposed setting a limit on toxic arsenic—at least “in infant rice cereal.”

Infants and children under four average the highest rice intake, in part because they eat like three times the amount of food in relation to their body size. So, there’s an especially “urgent need for regulatory limits” on toxic arsenic in baby food.

Pediatric nutrition authorities have recommended that when it comes to “rice and rice-based products,…[a]rsenic intake should be as low as possible.” And, hey, how about as early as possible? “Approximately 90% of pregnant women eat rice,” which may end up having “adverse health effects” on the baby.

You can estimate how much rice the mom ate while pregnant by analyzing arsenic levels in infant toenail clippings. “Specifically, an increase of 1/4 cup of rice per day was associated with [about a 17%] increase in infant toenail” arsenic, indicating that rice arsenic can be passed along to the fetus. What might that much arsenic do? A quarter-cup of rice’s worth of arsenic has been associated with things like “low birth weight,…increased respiratory…infections,” and above that, “a 5-6 point reduction in IQ.” So, “based on the FDA’s findings, it would be prudent for pregnant women to consume a variety of foods, including varied grains”—which is all code for “cut down on rice.” Saying “eat less” of anything, after all, is bad for business.

Then, once the baby is weaning, “what’s a parent to do? To reduce arsenic risks, [Consumer Reports] recommend[s] that babies [average] no more than [a] serving of infant rice cereal a day,” relying on other grains instead, which are much less contaminated. As the American Academy of Pediatrics has emphasized, “there is no demonstrated benefit of rice cereal over…other grains, such as oat[s and] barley,…all of which have lower arsenic levels than rice cereal.” Reducing consumption of infant rice cereal to just two servings per week could have an even more dramatic effect on reducing risk.

The proposed limit on toxic arsenic in infant rice cereals would end up removing about half off the shelves. The FDA recently analyzed more than 500 infant and toddler foods, and the highest levels of toxic arsenic were found in organic brown rice cereals and toddler puffs. Based on the wording, though I can’t confirm it, they appear to be this brand. Not-so-happy baby if they suffer brain damage, or grow up to get cancer. A single serving could expose infants to twice the tolerable arsenic intake set by the EPA for water. I contacted the Happy Baby company, and was told that they were “not able to provide any comments on [the FDA’s] results.”

“Eliminating all rice and rice products from the diets of infants and [small] children up to 6 years old could reduce the lifetime cancer risk:  6% lower chance of developing lung or bladder cancer” later in life if infants stopped; 23% lower chance if young kids stopped. But, switching to other grains is a move described as “drastic and dramatic,” creating a “huge crisis”—for the rice industry presumably—and therefore, evidently, “not feasible at all.”

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Scott Anderson via Flickr. Image has been modified.

Doctor's Note

I was hoping the Happy Baby company, upon learning of the concerning FDA arsenic toddler puffs data (whether it was in regards to their brand or not) would have kicked their own testing and potential remediation into high gear, like Lundberg did (see Which Brands & Sources of Rice Have the Least Arsenic?). But unfortunately, in my email correspondence with them, I got no sense that they did.

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102 responses to “Arsenic in Infant Rice Cereal

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  1. Any other topics besides arsenic?? I would suggest just creating one video on arsenic. A good scientist would integrate the information to cover many aspects on the subject. thank you.




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    1. Some of us want to hear the details. It’s impossible to get them all in one short video.

      A good scientist, like Dr. Greger, might make one comprehensive video on the subject of nutrition, which he has done, and it may be good enough for many people. However, there are many others who would like to have a more in-depth understanding.

      For me, anyway, the bottom line is simple: No rice, unless there is no better option (like in a restaurant).




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    2. I hear you. I’m always conflicted on breadth versus depth. Arsenic is just one of more than 2,000 topics I have videos about, but I realize not all subjects are of equal interest to folks and so try to keep my video series on any particular topic short. I felt the arsenic in rice story should be an exception, though. Yeah, I could have just done one quickie video about it but it would have left so many unanswered questions, and it’s a topic of practical importance for many people on a day-to-day basis.

      I never want to just tell people what I think they should do. The whole point of NutritionFacts.org is to share the available evidence so you can make up your own mind and decide what’s best for your own family. To do that though—like in this case—it requires a more in depth approach. Yes, I could have interspersed other topics between the arsenic videos, but I also don’t want to keep people hanging. I would be interested in others feedback though. Would you prefer I more topics more superficially, or fewer topics more deeply like I’m doing here. Basically I’ve been doing a mix of the two but if folks have a strong preference for one or the other I can move in that direction.




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      1. I enjoy the occasional series videos, but think that they should be limited to maybe 3-4 videos max (like the green smoothie series–packed with awesome information). After more than a week of one topic, I tend to lose interest.




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      2. I am eager for the info on how I can get the lifetime of arsenic out of my body, similar to the research showing high-dose vitamin C pulls lead out and silica water pulls aluminum out. So what is the third ingredient I put in my silica water + bell pepper smoothies?




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        1. fencepost
          PectaSol-C , claim their product is able to get arsenic out . it is made from the pith of citrus fruits . one would also assume that eating the whole citrus fruit pith and all would also work?




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        2. hi fencepost, I did look into your question during this series, and did post links (so did awesome NF forum poster “tom” ) about detoxing from arsenic. Apparently if our kidneys are in good shape we clear arsenic fairly rapidly ( 24 to 36 hours if I recall) . Some trials have suggested that selenium rich lentils for example could assist in that process. B12 and folate have also been mentioned as being helpful.

          The message I have gotten from all of this is how important it is to test one’s water supply , first and foremost. Then I have to wash produce more carefully, including beans, lentils and rice. Finally, I think I’ll continue to indulge in Indian white basmati for my curries occassionally, oatmeal for breakfast and forget the grain category otherwise. Quinoa and other gluten free grains just don’t work for me.
          Thank you Dr Greger for this series. It’s really been an eye-opener for me to see how the government works in tandem with industry promoting an outcome that is NOT in the best interest of the public. Shame on us that we put up with it. Vote with my dollars for sure.




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      3. I totally love the in depth approach, because rice is a huge thing in life, there is rice everywhere and I need to know all of those things. We avoid it almost entirely including the puffs and baby cereal already but I was unsure if I am overdoing it, as everyone always tells me. The info you presented is invaluable and helps to stay on course and be informed.I am really all for in depth videos, some of the videos leave me with questions and confusion because not all of the subject is covered. Some of it is personality, some of it is about interest. So you can never please everyone…




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      4. The rice/arsenic series constitutes a “wake up call” for me and probably for many others. I had no idea I was exposed to this harmful chemical. I agree that whatever decision we make individually about this topic, we need as much detailed information as you are willing to provide. So I’m grateful for the depth of discussion in this case.

        Those who didn’t have a clue about this issue are probably grateful for videos #1, #2.
        Those who needed an answer to the question “So what?” are probably grateful for videos #3, #4.
        Those who thought buying California Brown was a low risk solution are probably grateful for video #5.
        Those who wanted to know if we should all just stop buying rice altogether are probably grateful for video #6.
        Those with infants and young children in their households are probably grateful for today’s video.

        So my vote is to continue to balance breadth and depth as you have been.

        drc

        p.s.
        I hope everyone at the FDA has this website bookmarked. =]




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      5. Dr. Greger, I enjoy both types of videos (the more superficial and the series that go more micro). Some sub-topics under, e.g. “lead” or “arsenic” should be covered otherwise people will likely never become aware of them. And, after such a series, when it’s time to put the most important points together in the form of a “recap” or “clarification” video OR article, that would also be appreciated.




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      6. If this series had been about cauliflower or other non-staple for most people, a series this long would have of course been silly. But rice is a staple among staples, and the in-depth series is deserved. I personally would have liked to get a spoiler at the beginning so as to know what is recommended so I can act on it right away, but after knowing what to do, the in-depth study is something I enjoy. After having heard all the research, if at that point the spoiler-recommendation doesn’t quite sit right with me, I can make adjustments, but at least I didn’t wish I had known a month earlier that I was perhaps eating something that might have been harming me when I could have avoided it.




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        1. Hey Doug, dr. Greger gave several spoilers on social media – instagram and live Q&A when he finished filming the videos – long before they were published here. It was something like: no more than 2 cups per week of rice boiled in lots of water.




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      7. I appreciate the several videos on rice and arsenic: it is a widely used product in the USA and more so with vegans. We need all the facts available and I thank you Dr. Greger.




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      8. I like it! How about an in depth look at what grains are truly available to those of us who can’t eat gluten products. Rice is a big one for many of us. Oatmeal only works for some…




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        1. What about arsenic levels in other processed rice products? Do any have low levels?

          Both rice chips and rice pasta have become quite popular. I’d guess that rice chips have a high level of arsenic, but that rice pasta – because of the way it cooks – in large amounts of water that would presumably leach out arsenic – would have much lower levels.

          Any information on this?




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          1. I found this 2012 listing by Consumer’s Reports:

            “Results of our tests of rice and rice products”

            https://www.consumerreports.org/content/dam/cro/magazine-articles/2012/November/Consumer%20Reports%20Arsenic%20in%20Food%20November%202012_1.pdf

            Rice from India looked best – but no information I could find in the Table on what constitutes a serving size for different products, or whether they tested the products after cooking or straight from the package, which might make a big difference for pasta.. Also looks at lead and cadmium.




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      9. Dr. Greger, I totally trust your judgement on what topics that you research need multiple videos to fully cover these often complex subjects. Please continue to explore in depth those that call for an immediate understanding by your viewers, for the sake of preventing as much ill health as possible. Thanks for all of your labors of love!




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      10. I would like to see a series on what we should be eating on a realistic budget that most people can afford. Organic food is two to four times as expensive as conventional and in the case of rice at least, it’s not any safer. In this series alone I’ve learned that rice is unsafe due to arsenic, and potatoes and spinach are contaminated with high levels of chlordane, DDE’s and dioxins. How are we supposed to get the calories we need to function and not poison ourselves? From looking at EWG’s Dirty Dozen list, much of your Daily Dozen is heavily contaminated with pesticides. Apples, berries, peaches, pears, leafy greens, etc. Even green tea is contaminated with lead. Leafy greens are the healthiest food on the planet except they’re contaminated with neurotoxins.




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        1. This is exactly what I was referring to, re scaring people away from eating rice all together.

          Here’s a link to the Consumer Rerports piece that started the whole thing (the 2012 report Dr. Greger cites in this video):

          http://www.consumerreports.org/content/dam/cro/magazine-articles/2012/November/Consumer%20Reports%20Arsenic%20in%20Food%20November%202012_1.pdf

          Inorganic arsenic is the concern. If you look at many of the Jasmine varieties from Thailand or Basmati varieties from India (and California), you will notice they have 1/4 the inorganic arsenic content of some of the highest arsenic containing rices from areas of concern like Arkansas and Louisiana. Simply avoid eating rice produced in the USA (the California rice is fine, but way overpriced compared to the imports). It should be pretty easy to avoid buying US grown rice – as I mentioned previously, it only accounts for 1.4% of world rice production.




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          1. I agree to a large extent. I can get Thai jasmine brown rice for a pretty decent price at the local Oriental food store. But that only solves the rice problem. What about potatoes and all the fruits and vegetables that are contaminated with pesticides? In every “Year in Review” video Dr. G. lays out the overwhelming evidence for WPFD. But then we get a whole series on the dangers of eating rice. I would just like to know what other whole plant foods are actually so contaminated that we shouldn’t be eating them.




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        2. Read: Sprout for the Love of Everybody by Vik Kulvinkas, anything by Anne Wigmore and even check out The Science and Practice of Iridology by Dr.
          Bernard Jensen. Also, Mucusless Diet Healing system (online) by Prof.
          Arnold Ehret and the ever popular Back to Eden by Jethro Kloss. This is old school naturopathic classic literature. Single failure criteria, used in the nuclear industry in the U.S, investigates plan “B” in a failure.
          Now, there are numerous sub-headings. Study. Experiment. Learn. Find your comfort zone and rest easy.Murphy’s Law expresses that anything and everything can go wrong and when it does, what you gonna do? You don’t need assault weapons to be a peaceful survivalist and isn’t this what it is really all about? Discover the perfection in yourself and your identity with nature, as if there is anything else to work with. And have fun with it. Life without fun sucks up all the BS.The slaughterhouse mentality has gone too far in pervading every aspect of planetary civilization. The reliance on currency owned by oil and pharmaceutical promoting war inflames this. More water based foods. No known poisonous forms of grass including bamboo sprouts. Enough! Greger wants you to think and improvise.

          Virus-free.
          http://www.avg.com




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        3. Blair: I have some perspective for you that I think you might find helpful.

          First, on the topic of organic vs non-organic foods, check out a quote from one of my favorite NutritionFacts blog articles:

          “A new study calculated that if half the U.S. population ate just one more serving of conventional fruits and vegetables, 20,000 cases of cancer could be prevented. At the same time the added pesticide consumption could cause up to 10 extra cancer cases. So by eating conventional produce we may get a tiny bump in cancer risk, but that’s more than compensated by the dramatic drop in risk that accompanies whole food plant consumption. Even if all we had to eat was the most contaminated produce the benefits would far outweigh any risks.”
          from: http://nutritionfacts.org/2013/06/25/apple-peels-turn-on-anticancer-genes/

          I translate this bit of info into: Eat organic when you can, but don’t stress about it when you can’t.

          As for rice, you wrote, “In this series alone I’ve learned that rice is unsafe due to arsenic,…” I think that summary is leaving out some important information from this series. For example, we learned that a lot of food has low levels of arsenic. We don’t usually worry about those foods. The concern is when food has high levels of arsenic. When it comes to rice, most of the rice grown outside the USA and in California inside the USA has *low* levels of arsenic. So, right there, you have an easy way to avoid the high levels of arsenic if that’s a concern for you. We have also learned a couple of preparation/cooking techniques that can dramatically lower arsenic levels of rice even more. So, if you want to buy rice that has high levels arsenic, you can still do a lot to protect yourself.

          Note: I have not watched ahead to see Dr. Greger’s conclusions in the upcoming videos. This post is just my perspective based on the videos we have seen so far. In summary: It seems to me that this series has done a good job of educating us on the nuances of the issue. The nuances are important, because at least from what I’ve seen so far, the message is not a simple, “rice is unsafe”. The message is “Rice has the potential to increase disease risk. Here’s what you can easily do to protect yourself…” Of course, you can choose to not eat rice. I just wanted to give you an alternative perspective because it sounds like you are feeling that there is nothing left to eat.

          As for eating healthy in an affordable way, I have two cookbooks that I like and recommend: Vegan on the Cheap and Eat Vegan on $4 A Day. Those books are well researched and provide excellent examples of how to put together fairly healthy, whole plant food dishes. (Vegan on the Cheap uses oil. However, you can easily leave it out of most recipes.)




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        4. Blair – I appreciate your comments and frustration. Hard to keep track of all of these issues in our polluted world. It would be a cool idea for someone to put together a comprehensive “Here’s what to eat so far” list and share with the world. It’s a big undertaking.
          Nonetheless, things are beginning to change. I’ve noticed that the difference per pound between potatoes and organic potatoes is only about 20cents/lb. I just bought 5lbs of brown basmati rice from Thailand at Walmart for $3.50. That’s $.70/lb, the same or less than other rice with higher arsenic content. Prices of organic vegg are coming down over time and that’s because many of us vote with our dollars – those of us that can afford to.
          For myself, I use Dr. G’s information to create my own list of “what to buy and eat” so that I don’t have to revisit the videos every time (or try to find the one with the information I am seeking). It’s people like us that care about what we eat, what is in our food, what’s polluting the world, and what kind of world we’re leaving behind that drives the change. We just have to keep at it.




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      11. I think the series is fabulous. Yes, I stopped eating rice (and got a countertop water distiller, to boot!), but we now live in a world where our food choices are endless. Do I feel limited or restricted without rice? Not at all!!! You know what Ricky Nelson says in “Garden Party” (aptly named): “You can’t please everyone, so you got to please yourself.” Thus, I say this: You make the videos on whatever topics seem to be the best choices based on the info you have, make as many as you want, and make them as long/short as you want. My response: THANK YOU!




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      12. I personally think the more detail the better. Any info is helpful. If I wouldn’t be interested in details, I can filter out the interesting parts for myself. But better the info is given in the first place. Better make more videos into a series than making a quick one and leaving too many aspects unanswered.
        Hope that feedback helps.
        There’s one thing would suggest, if I may: In some videos, e.g. the previous one (how to cook rice to lower arsenic), I think a closing remark in the sense of the conclusion and final recommendation would be helpful. You know, in addition to saying “there’s fact A, there’s fact B, …” say “now in conclusion you should 1., 2., 3.”. Is this understandable?




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      13. The mix is good, but I do love the deeper dives, especially on subjects that warrant it such as this series & the series on lead.




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      14. Dr. Greger, I like the in-depth video series. I think you are striking the right balance between breadth and depth. And by that, I mean that I can’t imagine that anybody would be dissatisfied with either your breadth or your depth. You are nailing them both! If anyone wants to see a video on something besides Arsenic, there are already plenty of those, and more to come, once this series is finished.




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      15. I’d suggest 6 videos, or two weeks, as an approximate guideline for limits to video series on the same subject. Where its possible to combine subtopics in the series while keeping individual video length under 10 minutes, I don’t see much of a problem. It’s probably also wise to at least alternate between video series on beneficial and potentially harmful foods.

        One can imagine a new visitor to NutritionFacts from three weeks ago, thinking this is an anti-arsenic or anti-rice channel.




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      16. I have thoroughly enjoyed this series. This is a fascinating, necessary, in-depth look at how we take food safety for granted and how government and industry fails to rapidly respond to long-term chronic threats.




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      17. really appreciate the in depth look at arsenic because it effects my household directly as we consume a fair amount of rice. Your work has influenced me to change brands and also increased my use of quinoa , oats, and ancient grains. I see nothing but a benefit from this as we will get a wider range of nutrients in our diet. Plus it makes for more interesting meals. It is a win win in my opinion. I have got to say that our food industry is deeply corrupt in that it is more willing to poison babies than make changes to their agricultural practices. It reminds me of the Chinese infant formula scare where so many babies died.




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      18. Dr Greger, I know in the China study they found that a Diet low in animal products was protective against carinogens, or at least the ones they used. Has there been a study where they looked at if bladder cancer still developed in people who ate a WFPBD or if it was protective against the potential damage of the arsenic?




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      19. I must admit that I had not listen to the first three videos because I was overwhelm with all kind of things here at home. But noticing in my emails more and more videos about rice, which I like and eat often, it got my attention and I started from the beginning to discover a real problem. Thank you so much for insisting and giving us the opportunity to learn in depth about the arsenic problem. Unfortunately, some might not appreciate the in depth approach, but sometimes like this one seem appropriate to me. Continue your good work. It’s valuable. I looked forward to see the other videos and I’m eager to find out how is it possible that the FDA do nothing. It seems to me that there is a limit to listen to lobbies when it’s a matter of public health. Isn’t that a shame ?




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      20. I like deep dives. If you have more research to present, keep presenting! We want to know as much as possible about these critical health topics




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      21. I prefer deep specifics. The general stuff can easily be found online anyway. l also love these videos about contamination/toxicity where I wouldn’t expect it. Heck, while reading about rice and arsenic I’ve found that BRUSSEL SPROUTS may be high in arsenic. If not for these videos, I would never have known. It might be the organic arsenic though and perhaps it too can be reduced by boiling brussel sprouts and throwing out the water (with some clear nutrient loss). A random link also lead me to read about how chicken are disinfected with chlorine after dying and it’s causing problems for exportation.

        Also, I think you should talk about lectins at some point. Most are inactivated by cooking or pressure cooking but some aren’t removed through normal methods. Dr. Gundry considers them a big problem for some people (although he may have a conflict of interest). Lectins are in everything and some are fine or even beneficial but the question is “when is too much and for which people?” and “which aren’t OK?”. Apparently, certain sugars can bind to lectins and basically inactivate them too and a healthy gut can reduce their negative impact. I think there’s a lot of information and misinformation on lectins. It’s a general sense of confusion built on a truth (plants don’t want to be destroyed so they need their own defenses) and some diets are basically built on trying to reduce them (Paleo diet). It would definitely be a topical subject with a lot of interest.

        Thanks a lot for all the great information you provide!

        BTW: The other thing that may be worth covering is taurine. Vegetarians and vegans supposedly have lower levels and it might affect endogenous AGE production. The body will synthesize its own carnitine, taurine and carnosine but it would be interesting if the impacts of various levels can be clarified.




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      22. Dr. Greger – This information is very important to me! Please keep this detailed information coming. I am very grateful for each and every one of the videos on arsenic! Thank you!




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      23. I love depth. Nutritionfacts.org is rare in the depth of evidence it provides. That’s the main reason I’m so loyal and watch every video! It helps me to understand important health topics in enough depth that I’m able to make informed decisions of my own and explain them to friends and family. I think that’s a good metric for sufficient depth.

        If you keep a mix of approaches, you’ll connect with more people. Richard Feynman said that about his lecturing style in one of his interviews.




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      24. Dr Greger…..You are correct in reporting ALL the facts on Arsenic and ANY subject to relay the scientific facts to your readers & supporters!! After all it is your “chosen & self appointed” mission to give us, your supporters, all the data on the new scientific Nutrition papers that are published and pass it on to us so that we can pick and choose what nutritional findings apply to the readers specifically. Example being, I don’t eat rice so it does not apply to me, but I read the synopsis that you report because my Grand children are all brought up on Pediatrician recommended rice cereal & Puffies!
        Readers should not be telling you to condense data reporting just because the data it too prolific for THEIR needs! It’s not a matter of Dr Greger reporting “more topics superficially, or fewer topics more deeply” the IMPORTANT Matter is to keep your readers & supporters informed about the most important topics & data to keep us modifying our Daily Nutrition…..and “HOW NOT TO DIE” by keep all of our family as Healthy as possible!!
        I Thank you for your hard work and the Mission that you have chosen, to honor your Grandmother and keep us all healthier as a result!! Bless YOU!




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    3. I believe a number of people, including yours truly, have already made this comment. One video highlighting the high arsenic content of most US grown rice as well as some of the health risks associated with excess arsenic exposure would have sufficed.

      This series is basically scaring people away from consuming any rice, despite US rice accounting for just 1.4% of world rice production. While it’s nice of Dr. Greger to highlight on occasion that the problem is primarily with US-grown rice, most people will miss the finer details and try to avoid rice all together. Given that rice is one of the main staples of most plant-based diets, this isn’t helping.

      When most of the propaganda about arsenic in rice is being churned out by the paleo/keto/stuff-your-face-with-grass-fed-beef-n-butter crowd, someone leaving this site to go search the web for ‘arsenic in rice’ will invariably come across those pages. If they were new to or in the process of considering a plant-based diet, they may well reconsider their decisions. Again, the way this series has been constructed is not helping the cause.




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      1. I read that rice in part of Asia is full of arsenic too, not due to pollution, but due to Nature. And yet they eat rice 3 times a day and have no cancer. Their noodle is made of rice too.




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    4. “Joe” – People like you will complain about anything. This is a free site with hundreds of videos put out by a man who has dedicated his life to helping others and here you are complaining and indirectly insulting. If you dont like it go somewhere else.




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      1. Ad hominem (Latin for “to the man” or “to the person”[1]), short for argumentum ad hominem, is now usually understood as a logical fallacy in which an argument is rebutted by attacking the character, motive, or other attribute of the person making the argument, or persons associated with the argument, rather than attacking the substance of the argument itself




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    5. Are you familiar with this site? He does short video series on different topics. He is very throrough to provide the best and most recent research covering nutrition. If you are just joining this site you can search specific foods or diseases to get more videos. They also have a topic list you can choose from for all previously done series.




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    6. Plenty of scientific studies are done on small control groups or a vase number of subjects. I wouldn’t call that bad science. Just different approach. The Good Dr has been putting out his videos for free for years and helping other people understand complex scientific research. I call him a Great Scientist for doing that.




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  2. What about the organic form of arsenic that exists in regular organic brown rice. Is this, non-pesticide causing arsenic – also
    contributory to the cancer risk? Yes, I know this form of arsenic is less harmful, but, does it still create an increase in the
    bladder c. risk when consumed in large amounts? Might someone who consumes large amounts of california grown organic
    brown rice be at tightened risk?




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    1. Hi, Bu. The term organic, as used to refer to forms of arsenic, does not have the same meaning as the term organic as applied to agricultural practices. It refers to organic chemistry. Rice, whether grown organically or not, absorbs arsenic from the soil and water in which it is grown, and that varies a lot from one place to another. You can learn more about arsenic contamination of our food supply here:
      https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/arsenic/
      I hope that helps!




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  3. I do like the greater depth on one topic. Of course in this case there are still many remaining questions like exposure to arsenic from other related sources. This comes up for me because as a child I lived in cotton country for a few years in the 60s and I well remember the smell from the crop dusters. Was that arsenic based pesticide or DDT? Also what could be grown on those fields now that would absorb significantly less arsenic? Soy beans are frequently grown in the area now. What about their uptake. And what remediation steps might be taken to eliminate or reduce the arsenic uptake by food crops?
    Oh well, at least we won’t run out of questions and get bored as a result.




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    1. Stewart E
      Most likely DDT , as arsenic would have been discontinued by about 1950,s for that particular crop . Arsenic was used in apple orchards as late as 1972 in Ontario Canada . BY the way DDT stinks like poison and arsenic has no odor.
      Apple trees do suck up some arsenic but does not transfer to the edible portions very well, also might add broccoli and kelp also suck up a lot of arsenic in their roots , but from the tests I can recall do not transfer to edible parts .




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  4. To specifically address the content of this video, a question that Dr. Greger did not answer was why most baby cereals are made with rice as opposed to other grains like oats, barley and corn. It’s a questions he could have asked the Happy Baby company or any of the other baby cereal manufacturers. I believe it’s because rice is more easily digested. Mothers in Asia and elsewhere have been feeding their kids creamed rice shortly after they stop weaning forever. Probably the most digestible thing after sugar water. I imagine Walter Kempner didn’t just stumble upon rice as the staple of his diet arbitrarily. He likely noticed that it was one of the things his ill patients were most easily able to digest.




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  5. Again, I would suggest “integrating” the information, meaning cover concepts that relate all the videos together. This would mean you have a strong understanding of the material. If a one hour video on arsenic is needed, great!




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    1. Babies, if breastfed, don’t need cereal at all. My very knowledgeable pediatrician says that’s why we are seeing so many allergic children. His advice, wait till the child indicates he is interested in what you are eating. Then share some wholesome fruits or veggies, those easily digested, and food he won’t choke on, with him. There is a reason they don’t have teeth yet!




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  6. Cereal of any kind, is to be avoided anyway because it is kind of processed food with nutrition cooked out and full of sugar. Same with juice and drink, rice or fruit juice. You better cook rice or oat meal and extract the juice for infant.




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  7. As a pediatrician, I’ve never understood the rice cereal thing. I skipped it for my kids and don’t recommend it for my patients. vegetables and fruits are the best thing to start with, and this seems evidence based (or at least not evidence disputed!).




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    1. I decided never to have kids. That’s a simple solution as in not eating tainted U.S. food products. We’re pushing 8,000,000,000 on this polluted planet and my ICBM is better than you ICBM. Sprout. Work around the military industrial food complex for profit BS. If you really don’t need it, you don’t. Greger, an M.D., is first to point out how dangerous the mass mind can be. Think of this as a food holocaust and walk away from the lies he is overturning on a scientifically objective level. . All benefit from truth. Health is wealth. Let’s count our blessings…and use them to profit us all.

      Virus-free.
      http://www.avg.com




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      1. I think the reason most people have kids is because it happens….it is programmed biologically.

        But you have to wonder why a species that claims to be so intelligent is overpopulating and polluting/overheating it’s planet…and talking about heading out to pollute others.

        I think the issue is women.

        But we’ll leave it at that….maybe women will want to take up the mantle of responsibility for for what they do. But I doubt it….seems that men are usually responsible for most bad things that happen to women. ;-)

        In the end….it looks like the whole species and many others will end up taking the heat…so to speak.




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  8. Dr. Greger,

    I think this series is awesome and think you should continue breaking it down the way you are. This type of analysis of studies and reports isn’t found like this anywhere. This is especially great for people that eat rice on a daily basis (like half the world) and want to navigate with how they should reduce or source better types.

    Thank you and keep up the great work.

    P.S. Years down the line when people are researching this topic, every video with different nuggets of information will be beneficial.




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  9. Regardless of video length, I like having a bottom line on what I should actually DO in order to be healthier and safer. While the supporting information is interesting, not everyone can figure out what to do with the info.




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    1. We need an occasional OVERVIEW of the various risks to health in order to keep some perspective as far as what to change and what is most important to change.

      My process is to make gradual changes where I can see the need without stressing out too much. Too easy to walk in front of a bus while fretting over arsenic in rice.

      I try to concentrate on making changes in my own life….since any change is difficult enough….without encountering the typical resistance from the unknowing.

      I use some Thai Jasmine rice and also some whole wheat pasta….to spread the risk.




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  10. Gluten free bread, crackers, pasta, flour, pizza crust, cookies, pretzels….nearly all gluten free products are full of RICE!!! Now that I have watched all of the arsenic videos to date, I am worried. What have I done to my body ingesting all this arsenic. I had no idea. How do I mitigate the risk at this point? Is there something I can eat or drink to flush out the arsenic in my body? Also, what are we gluten free people supposed to do for food. I simply do not have the time to make my own bread, crackers, pasta, etc. Even those products using quinoa or corn still usually have rice in them as well. ALL of the manufacturing companies need to be made aware of the problem with rice so they can change their ingredients and help keep us healthy.




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    1. You dont need grains to be healthy, actually, you become healthier once you stop all grains, they are harder to digest and causing problems for many peoples, they are pretty tasteless also, in starchy foods there are still sort of potatoes, roots, tubers, much healthier and more tasty~




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    2. I would think food companies are well aware of the arsenic in rice and their products. Bottom line, (and it IS all about the bottom line), is that rice is cheap allowing for larger profit margins.




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  11. Thank you for contacting Happy Baby regarding their toddler puffs products. I am outraged they are not more responsive. I scrupulously avoided infant rice cereal when my baby was an infant. When she started eating food, I bought those happy baby products because they seemed so healthy, and I thought, hey, it’s only a little puff or two of rice. (At least it’s not rice cereal, I said). Well, I noticed my toddler seemed really hyperactive and cranky after eating these on several occasions. Everyone thought I was nuts to think it was these “healthy, innocuous” puffs. But I did eventually stop buying them.
    Now I’m just angry . You think an organic company promoting healthy products for our most vulnerable would jump up and down to make sure their products are safe. Pretty sure these findings go against whatever mission statement they have.




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  12. I think and hope that at the end of this rice and arsenic series we will still be able to consume rice. According to T. Colin Campbell, we are constantly surrounded by carcinogens, that could initiate a cancerous process, but that it depends on our diets if it will progress into the malignant stages. My hope is that rice in a WFPB diet will turn out to be benign.




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  13. I would never have guessed I was contributing to arsenic toxicity in my body by eating rice, mushrooms and drinking cheap wine. Years ago I surprisingly found by labs that I was way above normal arsenic stores. I never pulled it all together but I did quit drinking cheap wine. Thanks to this series I can better understand how such a thing could have occurred. We need these in-depth series. Please, please, keep them coming when they carry as much importance as this series does: rice contamination affects everyone, the baby, the toddler, the elderly in nursing homes. The story isn’t just arsenic; the story is much more complex and it has to do with unwitted corruption of our food supply through previous agricultural practices. It can’t be covered in 3-5 minutes and should be exposed for everyone.
    It is my hope, that if “Joe” is sincere in his efforts; he will follow long enough to profit healthwise from these types of in-depth videos. Maybe he will even become a valuable contributor to this site. At present, the combination of his denigrating remarks: ” A good scientist would” and “This would mean you have a strong understanding of the material” combined with his apt description of an “Ad hominem” argument lead me to question his motivation. When one puts his three comments together he doesn’t maintain integrity. And essentially he presents no argument unless one calls lazy thinking with negative allusions to Dr. Gregor an argument.
    Thank you, Dr. Gregor, for focusing your heart and mind on what is most important for the public health and safety.




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  14. I totally couldn’t stomach rice at all when I was pregnant with both my kids- kinda grateful now haha!

    Can you do some videos about birth control pills? They are so surrounded by that magical pc cloud but they are basically like taking a cancer pill everyday…. I do fertility awareness and it’s basically awesome. Of course it doesn’t make anyone any money and it helps you be more healthy, informed, and independent but we’d rather just follow the herd…….

    Thanks for the great videos!!




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    1. Would love to send this to my daughter and daughter-in- law, but can’t find the ‘Forward’ command. Please help.
      Sincerely,

      Sherry Foster
      Not on Facebook




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      1. Sherry, if you have an iPad at the top of the screen there is a box with an arrow pointing up. Just click on it, and it will enable you to send it by e-mail.
        On regular computer you can copy and put in e-mail.




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      2. Hi Sherry! Thank you for being open to sharing the video. You should be able to copy the web address at the top of the browser or if you see and click the ellipses (…) on the left of this page, you should be able to find your email website and send it that way.

        I hope this helps! Thanks for the support.




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  15. I grew up in India and we eat lunch and dinner with rice and half of break fast includes rice and other lentils. After reading through series and consumer reports, we reduced to one time a day with Lundberg organic brown rice that we bought in Costco. For dinner, we eat chapathis(tortillas) and thanks to my RotiMatic which can make in 15 minutes by just pouring flour, oil and water.

    I still can’t trust rice from India since farmers might use a lot of chemicals (fertilizers, pesticides) though arsenic levels might be less. I am hoping for better regulations from government. People in India are so scared now to eat anything. There are tons of video that there is plastic rice in India that was imported from China. I really not sure how accurate it is but the videos spread like wild fire.

    Rice really makes Indian curries to be enjoyable. We are slowly exploring others like Quinoa etc. Appreciate for all series. It is difficult to cook rice without the rice cooker. I am hoping for any research on reducing arsenic levels by soaking in water or salt water etc.




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  16. Considering that rice has undesirable amounts of arsenic, what should I replace it with as my staple whole grain to add to soups? Wheat berries (durum, emmer, etc), oats, barley, pseudocereals? I can’t understand why it’s so difficult to find bulk quantities (5kg ideally) of whole wheat, barley, oats, etc when I live in a capital city. Rice is so easy to find at any supermarket but other grains I have to seek out. Whole grains are particularly hard to find. I have never found oat groats or whole barley, all I find is steel cut oats, bulgur, and pearled barley. Too scared to buy the animal feed bags of wheat.

    Why can’t industry be made responsible to treat soils, water supplies, etc? Off the top of my head, growers could treat their land by growing plants that soak up toxins and combust well. The growers could incinerate the plants and with some additional energy input (from renewables?) turn the biomass into a plasma gas to separate the plant into its elements. It could be a way to mine trace elements. Seaweed farmers could do the same with something like hijiki to clean up oceans. Polluters could be made responsible to do this so that growers don’t have to clean up their land as often. Our food should be clean right?




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  17. Thank you so much for this video. We are a WFPB family, but my 2 year old loves the Happy Babby puffs every now and than. I thought oh well it’s organic right… Little did I now… I am blown away again. Thank you so much for Informing me again. I love the work you do!
    And I love both types of videos!




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  18. I generally like the mix of in depth series with other topics. Please continue! Sometimes I have to go back and re-read the series to be able to draw my own conclusions. This comes in part from reading all the comments and getting a little lost in all the details.
    I wanted to contribute a grain combination recipe that we frequently use. While quinoa is a great addition to soup as it cooks along with the soup, I think that it is too dry and light on its own. We have found that it is much improved by the addition of millet. Use 3/4 cup of millet + 1 1/4 cup of quinoa. Boil 3 cups of water and a pinch of salt and add the (rinsed and drained) millet and quinoa. Bring it to a boil again and then reduce to a simmer covered and cook for 20 minutes. Open and fluff it up a bit after cooking for 5-10 minutes and then cover to prevent it drying out too much. You can substitute some red or black quinoa (typically 1/4 cup) into the quinoa portion, it has a harder texture, but more antioxidents.




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  19. I’ve stayed away from giving my 7 month old rice cereal for other reasons , but now extra glad I did. However I have been told that she should have rice cereal for the iron, as breastmilk is supposedly not sufficient from 6 months onwards. Is this true? If I’m feeding her veggies and she’s still otherwise breastfeeding, is iron something I really need to worry about? On an even bigger tangent I also am uncertain about whether to give her allergens like dairy and egg now on the basis of avoiding her developing an intolerance (even though we intend to raise her on a plant based diet long term)…




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    1. Rozzi-
      Pretty sure you can theoretically live on breast milk and nothing else until you’re like 1 or 2. I know if you get switched to just plain dairy milk before you’re one you can get like a life threatening iron deficiency- that’s why they always say formula (or breast milk) until kids are one. My kids never had rice cereal- I think it’s a waste of time and apparently not very good for them..! If you want to do a cereal to get them used to a bulkier food we did a little oatmeal with breast milk- and as a side note oatmeal has tons of iron. We just ground it up into like a flour before we added the milk. Otherwise fruits and veggies are awesome first foods and full of amazing things for your baby!!!

      As for the allergens don’t worry about it. You never have to feed them those foods ever. I’m really grateful for my dairy allergy because then people can’t pressure me into eating animal foods that I don’t want to haha :)

      Go plant based Moms! Yeah!!




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      1. Thanks Stella, that makes me feel better! I hadn’t really worried about the iron thing too much but it was one of those things in the back of my mind…

        Yay for plant based mamas!




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  20. Rozzi,

    I’ll start with the last question first. Avoiding most of the top allergens, till at least 1 year of age makes good sense, to me. You want as intact a gut and developed immune system as possible, prior to the intake. Some literature suggests that that maturation will take upwards of 2 years.

    There are many publications on this subject including conventional journals: suggesting delay https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23287585 to those who completely dismiss this approach https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4046529/. The issues should include some consideration of the permeability of the GI tract. And as a note, your breastfeeding has a positive impact on your child’s GI development, so keep up the input.

    Considering the egg and dairy issues (see dozens of Dr. Greger’s videos) it’s questionable why it makes sense to push the exposure. I’d draw your attention to the publication, Gastrointestinal function development and microbiota and recognize that there is no well known answer as there are way to many differences between children/parents and their environment.

    So where does that leave a parent….. my clinical experience time and again was that parents with sensitivities to certain foods should avoid the early introduction of foods in their children’s diets, until much later in life. As long as your child is developing normally and hitting the milestones along with feeling well and getting great nutrition from your diet…why encourage an immature immune system to go into overdrive ? Feed yourself optimally and make certain that your iron levels (ck ferritin are at least 30 or preferentially around 50’s) are adequate.

    This late food intro is perhaps the overly protective approach to medicine, however your choice determines a lifelong effect…..and with the pollution of both dairy and eggs, along with their increasingly recognized allergy sensitization why tempt a problem when they are, contrary to the industries non-essential foods….

    Dr. Alan Kadish moderator for Dr. Greger http://www.Centerofhealth.com




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  21. I cannot seem to find the list of baby foods that was shown in the video (5:50). My sister is currently feeding my niece Happy Baby rice puffs, and I wanted to be able to suggest an alternate brand that contained the least amount of inorganic arsenic. Can anyone help me with this, please?




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      1. Thanks for the response, kind sir. However, I do not believe this is the same document. If you do a search for “Toddler Puffs” in this document no results come up.




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  22. Hi, Miles Davis. The graphic depicted in the video may not have come directly from the document posted, but the information in it probably did. The reason “Toddler Puffs” may not appear in search results may be that the product is identified by a code. In order to get the specific product information, one would have to look up the code. I hope that helps!




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  23. Dr. Greger / NutritionFacts.org Team,

    What are the risks of keeping my 1yo on a vegan diet? Unfortunately, breastfeeding only lasted a few months… Then we put him on soy formula. It’s not often that I find studies on children this young so I figured I’d ask your opinion? & do you have any suggestions? (The soy formula we use contains B12).

    In addition, The Child Development Center (Daycare) is pushing to start him on “table food”-which they classify as chicken nuggets, cheese tortilla, hamburger, etc. I have a meeting this week with the Center’s staff in order to “argue” my point on why I don’t want my child eating dead animals. How do you recommend I approach this meeting, and what fact backed information would you suggest I refer in order to convince them that it is in the best (health) interest of my son-to not consume animal product.

    Hope to hear from you soon! Thanks for all that you do!

    -TJ




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    1. TJ: You are on the right track and doing what is best for your child. I have some resources that should help you get started on being able to bolster your case. Here is a post that I often share with people:

      First, note the following quote from a position paper from the ADA: “It is the position of the American Dietetic Association that appropriately planned vegetarian diets, including total vegetarian or vegan diets, are healthful, nutritionally adequate, and may provide health benefits in the prevention and treatment of certain diseases. Well-planned vegetarian diets are appropriate for individuals during all stages of the life cycle, including pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, and adolescence, and for athletes.”
      .
      Also note this quote from Dr. Greger’s book, How Not To Die, page 411-412: “Vitamin B12-fortified plant-based diets can offer health benefits for all stages of the life cycle. [When] Dr. Benjamin Spock, the most esteemed pediatrician of all time,…died at ninety-four, he advocated children be raised on a plant-based diet with no exposure to meat or dairy products. … ‘Children who grow up getting their nutrition from plant foods have a tremendous health advantage and are much less likely to develop health problems as the years go by.’ ”
      .
      But having said that, there are some ‘gotchas’ when it comes to young children and whole plant food diets (just like there are gotchas with children and any diet). So, it really is worth spending some time reviewing accurate, evidence-based information on the topic. Here’s some ideas for specifics:
      .
      PCRM is the Physician’s Committee For Responsible Medicine, headed up by Dr. Barnard. Dr. Greger has mentioned Dr. Barnard and PCRM favorably in posts and his book. Here are two articles from PCRM that I think contains the type of information you are looking for:
      http://www.pcrm.org/health/diets/vegdiets/vegetarian-diets-for-children-right-from-the-start
      http://www.pcrm.org/pdfs/health/info_children.pdf
      http://www.pcrm.org/pdfs/health/info_advchild.pdf
      .
      I’ll also refer you to a site called the Vegetarian Resource Group, VRG. Their articles are usually very well researched and Dr. Greger has mentioned VRG favorably at least once. VRG has a whole section on kids on their website.
      Here’s the main page. Scroll down to the Nutrition section:
      http://www.vrg.org/family/kidsindex.htm
      This is one of my favorite articles on that page. which starts with babies and goes on up:
      http://www.vrg.org/nutshell/kids.php
      .
      Finally, I *highly* recommend getting a book called, Becoming Vegan, Express Edition. That book is a great over-all reference book for the whole family. It also has an entire chapter on children and what to feed. It also includes an age-based chart where you can get ideas on how much of each of the main nutrients your child needs at various ages. The authors of that book have been guest bloggers here on NutritionFacts. They are very well respected and extremely knowledgeable about nutrition science and how it applies to all ages.
      .
      I really hope this helps you to get your people on board. It’s not just about respecting the decisions you make as a parent. Consuming animal products and junk food puts your child at risk. It’s just not OK for people to push that on you.




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      1. Thea,

        This is all great information! Thank you for the quick reply & all of the references! This definitely provides essential info for the upcoming meeting with the childcare center.

        Seriously can’t thank you enough, this was above & beyond my expectations! Keep doing great work!

        Very respectfully,




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