Cancer Risk from Arsenic in Rice & Seaweed

Cancer Risk from Arsenic in Rice & Seaweed
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A half-cup of cooked rice a day may carry a hundred times the acceptable cancer risk of arsenic. What about Maine coast seaweed?

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

“At [some] point during the reign of King Cotton, farmers in the south central [U.S.] controlled boll weevils with arsenic-based pesticides, and residual arsenic still contaminates the soil.” Now, different plants have different reactions to arsenic exposure. For example, tomatoes don’t seem to accumulate much, but rice plants are really good at sucking it out of the ground—so much so that rice can be used for “arsenic phytoremediation,” meaning you can plant rice on contaminated land as a way to clear it from the soil, Of course, then, you’re supposed throw it and the arsenic away, but in the South, where 80% of U.S. rice is grown, we instead feed it to people.

But, national surveys have shown that most arsenic exposure has been measured coming from meat, poultry, and fish in our diet, rather than grains, but most of that is from the fish. So, if seafood is contributing 90% of our arsenic exposure from food, then why are we even talking about the 4% from rice? Because the arsenic compounds in seafood are “mainly organic”—used here as a chemistry term, nothing to do with pesticides—and organic arsenic compounds, because of the way our body can more easily deal with them, “have historically been viewed as [relatively] harmless.” Now, recently, there’ve been some questions about that assumption, but there’s no question about the toxicity of inorganic arsenic, which you can get more of from rice.

As you can see, rice contains more of the toxic inorganic arsenic than seafood, with one exception. Hijiki, an edible seaweed—a hundred times more contaminated than rice, leading some researchers to refer to it as the “so-called edible…seaweed.” Governments have started to agree. “In 2001, the Canadian [government] advised the public not to eat hijiki.” Then, the UK, the rest of Europe, Australia, New Zealand, then China “advised the public not to eat hijiki, and banned imports and sales” of the stuff. Japan, where they actually have a hijiki industry, just advised moderation.

What about Maine coast seaweed—domestic, commercially-harvested seaweed from New England? We didn’t know, until now. Thankfully, only one type had significant levels of arsenic, a type of kelp. But, it would take over a teaspoon to exceed the provisional daily limit for arsenic, and at that point, you’d be exceeding the upper daily limit for iodine by like 3,000%, ten times more than reported in this life-threatening case report attributed to a kelp supplement. So, I’d recommend to avoid hijiki due to its excess arsenic content, and avoid kelp due to its excess iodine. But all other seaweeds should be fine, as long as you don’t eat them with too much rice.

What does a number like this mean, though? 88.7 micrograms of inorganic arsenic per kilogram of raw white rice? I mean, that’s only 88.7 parts per billion. That’s like 88.7 drops of arsenic in an Olympic-size swimming pool of rice. So, how much cancer risk are we talking about? Well, just to put it in context, “[t]he usual level of acceptable risk for carcinogens is” one extra cancer case per million. That’s how we typically regulate cancer-causing substances. Whenever some industry wants to release some new chemical, we want them to show that it doesn’t cause more than one in a million excess cancer cases. Now, we have 300 million people in this country; so, that doesn’t make the 300 extra people who get cancer feel any better, but you have to cut it off somewhere. Okay.

The problem with arsenic in rice is that the excess cancer risk associated with eating just about a half-cup of cooked rice a day could be closer to one in 10,000. That’s a hundred times the acceptable cancer risk. The FDA has calculated that one serving a day of the most common rice, long grain white, would cause not one in a million extra cancer cases, but 136 in a million.

And, that’s just the cancer effects of arsenic. What about all the non-cancer effects? The “FDA acknowledges that, in addition to cancer, [the toxic] arsenic [found in rice] has been associated with many non-cancer effects, including…heart disease, diabetes, skin lesions, [kidney] disease, hypertension, and stroke.” The only reason they just stuck to calculating the cancer risks is that assessing all the other risks would take a lot of time, and that “would delay taking any needed action to protect [the public’s] health” from the risks of rice.

Yes, “physicians can help patients reduce their dietary arsenic exposure, [but] regulatory agencies, food producers, and legislative bodies have the most important roles” in terms of public health scale changes. “[A]rsenic content in US-grown rice has been relatively constant throughout the last 30 years,” which is a bad thing.

“Where[ver]…arsenic concentration is elevated due to ongoing contamination, the ideal scenario is to stop the contamination at the source.” Some toxic arsenic in foods is from natural contamination of the land, but soil contamination has also come from dumping arsenic-containing pesticides, “and the use of arsenic-based drugs in poultry production,” and then spreading the arsenic-laced chicken manure on the land. Regardless of why Southern rice paddies are so contaminated, maybe we shouldn’t be growing rice in arsenic-contaminated soil.

What does the rice industry have to say for itself? Well, they started a website, called ArsenicFacts, no less. Always got to be skeptical of any group that claims “facts” in their title; *ahem*. Their main argument appears to be, look, arsenic is everywhere; we’re all exposed to it every day. It’s in most foods. So, what, we shouldn’t try to cut down on the most concentrated sources? Isn’t that like saying, look, diesel exhaust is everywhere; so, why not suck on a tailpipe? They quote some nutrition professor saying, look, all foods have a little bit. So, eliminating arsenic would decrease your risk a little bit, but you’d die of starvation. That’s like Philip Morris saying look, the only way you’re going to completely avoid secondhand smoke in your life is to never breathe—and then you’d asphyxiate; so, might as well just start smoking yourself. If you can’t avoid it, you might as well consume the most toxic source you can find.

That’s the same tack the poultry industry took. Arsenic & chicken? No need to worry, because there’s a little arsenic everywhere. See? So, that’s why it’s okay that we fed our chickens arsenic-based drugs for 70 years. If you can’t beat ‘em, join ‘em.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

“At [some] point during the reign of King Cotton, farmers in the south central [U.S.] controlled boll weevils with arsenic-based pesticides, and residual arsenic still contaminates the soil.” Now, different plants have different reactions to arsenic exposure. For example, tomatoes don’t seem to accumulate much, but rice plants are really good at sucking it out of the ground—so much so that rice can be used for “arsenic phytoremediation,” meaning you can plant rice on contaminated land as a way to clear it from the soil, Of course, then, you’re supposed throw it and the arsenic away, but in the South, where 80% of U.S. rice is grown, we instead feed it to people.

But, national surveys have shown that most arsenic exposure has been measured coming from meat, poultry, and fish in our diet, rather than grains, but most of that is from the fish. So, if seafood is contributing 90% of our arsenic exposure from food, then why are we even talking about the 4% from rice? Because the arsenic compounds in seafood are “mainly organic”—used here as a chemistry term, nothing to do with pesticides—and organic arsenic compounds, because of the way our body can more easily deal with them, “have historically been viewed as [relatively] harmless.” Now, recently, there’ve been some questions about that assumption, but there’s no question about the toxicity of inorganic arsenic, which you can get more of from rice.

As you can see, rice contains more of the toxic inorganic arsenic than seafood, with one exception. Hijiki, an edible seaweed—a hundred times more contaminated than rice, leading some researchers to refer to it as the “so-called edible…seaweed.” Governments have started to agree. “In 2001, the Canadian [government] advised the public not to eat hijiki.” Then, the UK, the rest of Europe, Australia, New Zealand, then China “advised the public not to eat hijiki, and banned imports and sales” of the stuff. Japan, where they actually have a hijiki industry, just advised moderation.

What about Maine coast seaweed—domestic, commercially-harvested seaweed from New England? We didn’t know, until now. Thankfully, only one type had significant levels of arsenic, a type of kelp. But, it would take over a teaspoon to exceed the provisional daily limit for arsenic, and at that point, you’d be exceeding the upper daily limit for iodine by like 3,000%, ten times more than reported in this life-threatening case report attributed to a kelp supplement. So, I’d recommend to avoid hijiki due to its excess arsenic content, and avoid kelp due to its excess iodine. But all other seaweeds should be fine, as long as you don’t eat them with too much rice.

What does a number like this mean, though? 88.7 micrograms of inorganic arsenic per kilogram of raw white rice? I mean, that’s only 88.7 parts per billion. That’s like 88.7 drops of arsenic in an Olympic-size swimming pool of rice. So, how much cancer risk are we talking about? Well, just to put it in context, “[t]he usual level of acceptable risk for carcinogens is” one extra cancer case per million. That’s how we typically regulate cancer-causing substances. Whenever some industry wants to release some new chemical, we want them to show that it doesn’t cause more than one in a million excess cancer cases. Now, we have 300 million people in this country; so, that doesn’t make the 300 extra people who get cancer feel any better, but you have to cut it off somewhere. Okay.

The problem with arsenic in rice is that the excess cancer risk associated with eating just about a half-cup of cooked rice a day could be closer to one in 10,000. That’s a hundred times the acceptable cancer risk. The FDA has calculated that one serving a day of the most common rice, long grain white, would cause not one in a million extra cancer cases, but 136 in a million.

And, that’s just the cancer effects of arsenic. What about all the non-cancer effects? The “FDA acknowledges that, in addition to cancer, [the toxic] arsenic [found in rice] has been associated with many non-cancer effects, including…heart disease, diabetes, skin lesions, [kidney] disease, hypertension, and stroke.” The only reason they just stuck to calculating the cancer risks is that assessing all the other risks would take a lot of time, and that “would delay taking any needed action to protect [the public’s] health” from the risks of rice.

Yes, “physicians can help patients reduce their dietary arsenic exposure, [but] regulatory agencies, food producers, and legislative bodies have the most important roles” in terms of public health scale changes. “[A]rsenic content in US-grown rice has been relatively constant throughout the last 30 years,” which is a bad thing.

“Where[ver]…arsenic concentration is elevated due to ongoing contamination, the ideal scenario is to stop the contamination at the source.” Some toxic arsenic in foods is from natural contamination of the land, but soil contamination has also come from dumping arsenic-containing pesticides, “and the use of arsenic-based drugs in poultry production,” and then spreading the arsenic-laced chicken manure on the land. Regardless of why Southern rice paddies are so contaminated, maybe we shouldn’t be growing rice in arsenic-contaminated soil.

What does the rice industry have to say for itself? Well, they started a website, called ArsenicFacts, no less. Always got to be skeptical of any group that claims “facts” in their title; *ahem*. Their main argument appears to be, look, arsenic is everywhere; we’re all exposed to it every day. It’s in most foods. So, what, we shouldn’t try to cut down on the most concentrated sources? Isn’t that like saying, look, diesel exhaust is everywhere; so, why not suck on a tailpipe? They quote some nutrition professor saying, look, all foods have a little bit. So, eliminating arsenic would decrease your risk a little bit, but you’d die of starvation. That’s like Philip Morris saying look, the only way you’re going to completely avoid secondhand smoke in your life is to never breathe—and then you’d asphyxiate; so, might as well just start smoking yourself. If you can’t avoid it, you might as well consume the most toxic source you can find.

That’s the same tack the poultry industry took. Arsenic & chicken? No need to worry, because there’s a little arsenic everywhere. See? So, that’s why it’s okay that we fed our chickens arsenic-based drugs for 70 years. If you can’t beat ‘em, join ‘em.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Doctor's Note

Wait a second; how can the rice industry get away with selling a product containing 100 times the acceptable cancer risk? I cover that, and so much more, in my next nine videos on arsenic and rice, including concrete recommendations on how to mediate your risk.

Stay tuned for:

The source of arsenic was not just pesticides, but poultry poop, if you can believe it. That story is in Where Does the Arsenic in Chicken Come From? and Where Does the Arsenic in Rice, Mushrooms, and Wine Come From?

And chronic low-dose arsenic exposure is associated with more than just cancer. See The Effects of Too Much Arsenic in the Diet.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

160 responses to “Cancer Risk from Arsenic in Rice & Seaweed

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  1. So what percentage of “inorganic” arsenic is in organic california white and brown rice?
    What % of organic arsenic is in organic california white and brown rice?

    I think we maybe should be determining our rice intake based on this answer, no?




    15
    1. I too am curious about organic and inorganic arsenic. I eat east coast Canadian herring filets and intuitively feel like I am eating low-food-chain fish that should be less contaminated than most.

      Would like more details on the difference between organic and inorganic in all pollutants when the data is available.




      1
        1. Thanks for the link Christine. Now if I only knew how toxaphene (and at what levels) affects my health. ‘-)

          But I get your implied point that any pesticide ingestion is not a good thing.

          It is my belief that we are unable to completely avoid contaminates no matter what we eat and how carefully we choose our nourishment. Still, I applaud those who undergo the transition to Veganism, whether totally or in the spirit of. Doing so requires dedication and fortitude. It is only right that they should reap a reward of better health and a shorter death throe.

          I aim for the same outcome with the added benefit of extreme longevity. And while I do try to keep my diet mostly plant based (even to the extreme of eating ice cold watermelon from the patch at least three times a day ‘-) I also supplement my diet with vitamins, herbs, teas, spices, and various dried powders with concentrated nutrition. (I know, I know… expensive urine. So I save my urine and use it to fertilize the vegetation around my property. My trees have never looked so healthy!)

          I also look beyond what is available now and look and learn of things, plausible things, that are going to become available to us. Don’t get me wrong, I’m not looking to implant a computer chip in my brain or have little tiny rowbots (sic) coursing through my blood vessels.

          But I am all in on eventually getting a pill, injection, whatever… of a molecule or protein like TIMP2, found in abundance in human umbilical cord blood and found to enhance nerve cell activity.

          This is just one of the things that are coming down the pike so to speak, and it is my belief and course of action that these types of discoveries will be what will enable me to overcome any damage to my person. But I do realize that I can’t be reckless with my health because we don’t know when or how expensive these life/health-extenders will take to appear or become affordable.

          Do whatever it takes to not become ill… your extended life may depend on it.




          0
  2. So I’ve been eating a lot of Indian food lately, which means eating a half cup of basmati rice on days I eat it. What grain should I switch to so I still enjoy it? Maybe naan bread instead? What about the extra sodium in the bread? Is it preferable to the arsenic in the rice?




    6
    1. I find farro to be a good substitute for brown rice; while it is not truly a whole grain (it is polished a bit), it has some good nutritional properties. Wheat berries are whole grain and could be used, but I find them a bit too chewy. Quinoa is also good with curry, but it takes a bit more getting used to. You could definitely make a good wrap with some whole grain naan or other flatbread. Sometimes I turn leftover curry into soup by just adding some water. Another possibility is to borrow from the paleos and use cauliflower rice.

      I think white basmati rice from India tested fairly low for arsenic; rinsing and cooking in excess water can help to lower arsenic levels.




      7
      1. (I should probably add that I find wheat berries good in salads, just not as a brown rice substitute for pairing with curries or beans.)




        0
    2. I eat quite a bit of quinoa or pearled barley with Indian and Thai food. I usually eat dry garlic roti instead of naan as it is whole wheat. Also, roti has no dairy, unlike naan. Luckily my local Indian restaurant is willing to omit butter and dairy from many of their dishes when requested. It’s possible to get bread without extra added salt, although that depends on the stores where you shop.




      3
      1. I get low sodium bread from Aldie’s. It has like 65 mg of sodium per slice which is really low as other breads contain like 300mg or more! They have different kinds, so make sure it says low sodium. I think it has red and blue print.




        0
  3. What confuses me is the large amount of white rice eaten by people down in south
    and central america. Several cups of cooked rice per day, 365 days a year, give or take a few days. Same
    goes for parts of Asia. I’ve travelled around planet and this seems to be accurate. Are these people dropping
    off in higher #’s and percentages, and suffering non-life threatening issues that also come along with arsenic ingestion, in
    higher #?




    19
    1. Do you think the South Americans are eating rice grown in contaminated soils in the southern US? Rice grown in uncontaminated soils is just fine.




      8
      1. This isn’t so. Even organic arsenic is an issue when eaten daily, 365 days a year, in cupful amounts, no?

        I have not seen any clear literature on this. Hopefully dr. g. can comment.




        2
      2. Wherever rice is grown on earth, it naturally absorbs lots of organic arsenic. So the south and central americans
        are ingesting lots of organic arsenic on a daily basis. This an issue? I don’t see why it wouldn’t be, as even large
        amounts of organic arsenic are to be of concern. So much contradiction with this issue, it seems.




        3
    2. Yep the Southern states have high obesity, diabetes, and some of the worst health profiles. Asia should be ok since they don’t grow rice in old cotton fields or fertilize with Ar laced chicken poop.




      4
      1. yes, but rice naturally absorbs organic arsenic from soil, and even high levels of organic arsenic can cause just as harmful ailments. 365 days a year of eating even organic arsenic, which is present in all asian rice, is still excessive arsenic exposure, especially over a lifetime, as these populations start eating rice daily when infants all the way for the next 80 or 90 years.




        0
      2. The arsenic is in commercial chicken meat of well (arsenic in chicken feed). It is what makes the chicken meat pink in color instead of tan (light brown) in organic-feed chicken. Plus, the chickens in the US have been altered genetically (soft tender meat) from what the original species is supposed to be (tough and chewy).

        http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/05/opinion/kristof-arsenic-in-our-chicken.html?mcubz=0

        As a side note, my psoriasis symptoms have improved dramatically since I stopped eating chicken (last month or so).




        0
  4. So…. 1 portion of rice per day for 50 years = 136 chance on a million to get cancer because of the arsenic… I’ts really not that bad….




    2
  5. I think it’s a little irresponsible to say ‘avoid kelp’ because of one type of high iodine kelp (and one that is grown domestically, even) There are a LOT of other species of edible seaweed called ‘kelp’, that are also grown in other parts of the world,

    I just feel like that blanket statement will lead to overall avoidance of anythkng that is called kelp, while based on what he said it’s only ONE type of kelp to be avoided

    Just my two cents




    1
      1. B”H

        Regarding kelp, you mention that there is a safe amount of iodine to have daily. I typically use a 3″ x 1″ piece of Maine kelp a couple times a week to cook with 3-4 cups of legumes, from which I personally eat 1/3 cup portion on successive days. So how much iodine might there be in that portion because the beans now become, let’s say, a total of 3 quarts once we had onions, cilantro, garlic, etc,?




        0
      2. Late reply but thanks for the response! The video made it seem ambiguous since you said ‘type of kelp’. Even the old videos are great.




        0
  6. Rice has been a big part of my diet since making the switch to whole food plant based. I buy organic rice made in California. Do you have any brands that you can recommend to avoid this?




    9
    1. hi Julie, in the comments sections of the previous videos of this series on atsenic you will find numerous references to california rice. Links are given for Lundberg rice company that publishes the results of it annual arsenic testing on its website. You can also google Lotus rice company that used to publish its arsenic testing results but has since replaced that it seems with a statement. here’s a link to friday’s video. https://nutritionfacts.org/video/the-effects-of-too-much-arsenic-in-the-diet/ As you can see under Doctor’s Notes, there is much more info to come in the videos ahead. Brown rice has much more arsenic than white Julie, but Lundberg does list its results for brown so you can make your own decision.




      3
    1. Thanks. That is valuable information. I wonder what the clinical implications are; whether diet can be an effective tool to mitigate arsenic exposure.




      0
  7. Also I’m a little shocked and confused about the figure shown in the cancer risk of arsenic consumption levels via rice in China and India, they are much higher than the states. I know they eat way more rice, but did they also use arsenic in their growing fields? What countries are and aren’t arsenic contaminated then?




    3
    1. Gail, I was wondering why only white rice is mentioned in the studies, but then I figured it is because it is by far the most commonly consumed type. Brown rice shouldn’t be any different as it is simply less polished.




      0
      1. Roger,
        Brown rice contains nearly twice the levels of arsenic as white rice because much of the arsenic is found in the hull which is is polished off before becoming white rice.




        8
      2. hi Roger, Consumer Reports looked into this thoroughly some years ago. You can download the origional test results for rice and rice products. http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/magazine/2012/11/arsenic-in-your-food/index.htm Brown rice has a lot more arsenic than white. Most of the arsenic accumulates in the outer layers which is why they recommend rinsing rice thoroughly and cooking in large amouts of water, then draining. I’m sure Dr Greger has more good tips for us in the videos yet to come !




        4
  8. Is there specific rice that is high in Arsenic? Is it from one group growing rice? Is it all rice that just soaks up Aresnic? Should I avoid Rice Milk/Drink?




    1
  9. As a health professional I am outraged when when I see other professionals who are, “for sale”. That so called, “Nutritionist” who smiles away at such an ethically challenged position statement should be stripped of her rights to practice. Why? because where does it stop? It is a slippery slope and the public remains vulnerable in every scenario.
    Dr. Greger has shown us again and again that researchers, scientists, health professionals, and I guess almost anyone can be “bought”.

    So that leads me to maintain that it is our responsibility to be aware and to financially support the non-profit work of people of Nutritionfacts.org so that we (who may no acumen in these areas) are able to get the facts and be protected from unethical individuals and entities and their drive to profit at the expense of our and our families health and wellness.

    A proud monthly supporter- join me!




    8
  10. I have read somewhere at a WFPB event that rice from some regions are low or no arsenic. Does anyone have info on this? Brown only please.




    0
  11. I have celiac disease and because I cannot eat wheat, rye, barely, spelt or even oats at this point rice is a huge part of my whole foods plant based diet. I am not a huge fan of quinoa or other gluten free grains that I have tried. These recent videos are leaving me saddened and little lost with what to do as I already feel extremely restricted in my diet. I probably consume far more rice than the average american because it is the cheapest most widely available non-gluten containing grain. Most of the rice that I eat is either short grain/occasionally long grain organic rice from Lundberg Farms who grows their rice in CA. After looking at their website they seem to average 93 ppb in their brown rices. I have two questions; is there a “safest” brand of rice to buy? Your videos have mentioned rice grown in the south has the highest arsenic levels… Should I be concerned about the high levels of arsenic I have been eating over the last 6 years?




    7
      1. You can do as I do and replace rice with starchy root veggies like sweet potatoes. Asian markets are full of colorful varieties. Or try one of the many gluten free grains available: quinoa, millet, amaranth, teff, buckwheat, Job’s tears.

        .




        1
    1. Eat more calories dense fruits to replace some rice carbs, sweetier, healthier and easier to digest to give you more energy.:D




      0
    2. Hi Crystal~
      I don’t have celiac disease but it seems rice is the only grain my body will tolerate. Other grains give me significant joint pain or headaches. So, I feel like you do.

      I always soak my rice overnight and drain it before I cook it. I hope that removes some of the arsenic…….




      2
      1. Are there any starches you can eat other than rice or sweet potatoes? I too can not tolerate most starches, white
        rice being exception.

        Do you avoid beans and most nuts? I do, and really wish starches were not such a struggle for me.
        Your experience?




        0
          1. Hey, thanks for the reply. What is it about starch, for you, that has you avoiding it?

            I am curious. For me it seems to be a macrobiome issue, and constipation.

            What foods do you normally eat to get the majority of calories? Fruits, veggies, nuts?
            Any beans? If white rice, how much?

            Yeah, the starch thing saddens me. I’d love to be able to eat potatoes, bread, all that sort of stuff.




            0
            1. I have problems digesting starch also, i guess it is a problem in deficiency in amylase….doesnt break down all the strach which ferment more or less and causing problems…




              0
    3. Hi Crystal,

      I am a volunteer moderator who helps Dr. Greger answer questions posted to Nutrition Facts. I am a plant based dietitian nutritional therapist and I often work with people such as yourself who have food sensitivities and a long list of items that are avoided for various reasons. It can indeed be disruptive and disheartening if one of your “go to ” foods goes onto the “no go” list. SIGH.

      As for your question regarding safer forms of rice, California grown appears to have the lowest levels of arsenic. You can rinse or soak your rice prior to cooking, which also helps to lower arsenic exposure. You cannot do anything about the arsenic exposure you’ve already had, but you can trust in the power of your own body to keep you healthy as you limit your future exposure by varying your whole grain intake.

      You mention that you are not a “huge fan” of quinoa. I would recommend that you try quinoa in another form, such as this great salad recipe that I share with clients.
      Ingredients:
      1 cup dry quinoa
      1 ¾ cup water
      ½ tsp sea salt
      ½ cup carrots, chopped
      ⅓ cup parsley, minced
      ¼ cup sunflower seeds
      4 cloves garlic, minced
      ¼ cup freshly squeezed lemon juice
      ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil ( you can substitute 4 tbps non oil hummus if you are limiting your intake of oils)
      2 tbsp tamari or shoyu
      Instructions:
      Rinse quinoa with warm water and drain through a fine strainer. Place quinoa, salt and water in a 2-quart pot. Bring water to boil, reduce heat to low, cover and let simmer 15 to 20 minutes, until all the water is absorbed. Tip pan to the side to make sure all the water has been absorbed. Let stand for 5 to 10 minutes uncovered, then fluff with a fork.

      Place cooked quinoa in a large bowl. Add carrots, seeds and parsley to quinoa. Mix thoroughly. Combine garlic, lemon juice, olive oil and
      tamari; pour over quinoa and toss well. Serve at room temperature or chilled. Serves 4.
      Description:
      Quinoa has an excellent nutritional profile (10.5 grams of protein per cup). This unique whole grain, which was a staple food of the Incas, is also rich in calcium and iron.

      This might improve your experience with quinoa, eaten in a different form. You can experiment with other recipes like this one, with other grains that you are not crazy about, to find some alternatives to your beloved rice.

      If in the end, it is just too difficult to limit or eliminate your rice intake because of your celiac disease, I’d recommend you consult with a qualified dietitian nutritionist to help you build an eating plan that works for you. You can find practitioners near you at http://www.plantbaseddocs.com.

      Best of luck!

      Warmly,
      Lisa Schmidt, MS, CN
      THE Mindful Nutritionist
      http://www.plantbaseddocs.com




      4
    4. That is good to know. I’ll definitely avoid any 25 pound bags from their company. Probably a good idea not to buy rice in large quantities at this point anyways.




      0
  12. When I made the switch over to plant based I was under the impression that nothing from plants could harm my health but only improve it. Since then I have learned the hard way that you can eat too many certain types vegetables and legumes and get gout. I also learned that the only grain that agreed with my digestive system was white rice. Not too long ago Dr. Greger put out a video that white rice could possibly cause diabetes. Now he’s saying that it can give me cancer?! It’s starting to look like I would have been better off to have never had made the switch to a plant based diet to begin with.




    1
    1. I can understand why Dr. Greger would say that, but what can we eat then? I feel like we need to know our options. It seems like everything is dangerous.




      2
      1. I certainly can understand why a person would feel this way! I believe the best interpretation of what Dr. Greger is saying here is MODERATION IS BEST. There are several types of grain products and starches we can enjoy; just don’t eat white rice every day, if you can help it. Take a look at what the longest-lived, healthiest individuals are eating: plant-based diets! See this really cute video for a summary of what’s best to eat: https://nutritionfacts.org/video/how-not-to-die-an-animated-summary/




        1
      2. I know. It’s hard to wonder what to eat. My holistic doctor last yr told me not to eat rice cuz of the arsenic, but i did not stop as it too is my main staple….eat it like 3 days a wk. Love it. I am older in my 60’s so i guess it really doesn’t matter much. If i was real young i would limit the rice yeah.




        1
    2. >>>you can eat too many certain types vegetables and legumes and get gout
      I doubt this. Are you subject to gout attacks? If not, you are worrying for no reason. Even if one is susceptible to gout, there is no reason to avoid eating plenty of beans and legumes or any other vegetables. I used to get gout but have not had a recurrence since becoming vegan over 2 years ago. I regulalry eat 1 cup of beans plus a serving of tofu and a cup of soy milk per day. My uric acid level is normal, typically between 5.3 to 6.

      Cf. e.g.
      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/preventing-gout-attacks-with-diet/
      http://www.brendadavisrd.com/plant-based-diets-and-gout/




      4
      1. Am i wrong? I thought i read that uric acid comes from eating things like meat and cheese? I don’t think veggies and grains cause gout. Anyway, drinking cherry juice is supposed to help.




        1
        1. Gout attacks result from high levels of uric acid. But apparently in some people (not me), the tendency to get gout attacks is associated with or can be exacerbated by high levels of oxalic acid. I was unaware of this possible connection before McDuncan’s comments. You are right that animal proteins are one of the prime triggers for gout since the purines produce uric acid. There are many other triggers e.g. too much alcohol. There are studies indicating that gneerally, plant proteins do not have the same effect,e .g. this 2014 study
          https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3889483/

          which said “We found that the short-term impact of purine from plant sources on the risk of gout attacks was substantially smaller than that from animal purine sources. Also, in a large prospective study of incident gout, the long-term, habitual consumption of purine-rich vegetables was not associated with the risk of incident gout.5 Interestingly, in that study, the highest quintile of vegetable protein consumption was actually associated with a 27% lower risk of gout compared with the lowest quintile.5 Our analysis of purine quantities suggests that these findings of small or null effects of purine intake from plant sources can be explained by the substantially lower amounts of purine content in those food items. Other healthy nutrients of vegetable items (eg, fibre or healthy fat) could contribute to reducing long-term weight gain21 and lowering insulin resistance.”

          However, I don’t think it wise to take plant protein supplements if one has a tendency to get gout. Various foods and nutrients other than cherries are said to help lower uric acid levels, e.g. regular coffee consumption, and vitamin C (~ 500 mg).

          http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/art.22762/full
          “Conclusion

          These findings from a nationally representative sample of US adults suggest that coffee consumption is associated with lower serum uric acid level
          and hyperuricemia frequency, but tea consumption is not. The inverse association with coffee appears to be via components of coffee other than
          caffeine.”

          My take as a former lacto-pesco-vegetarian who has had no recurrences since giving up the lacto and the pesco: there is no better choice than a whole food plant diet!




          1
    3. Fruits and vegetables/greens + nuts (in moderation) are still the safest and healthiest foods by far, good news we are a frugivorous species, we dont need anything else to be healthy and thrive with a B12 supplement~




      1
    4. Are you sure you’re a vegan and not a troll? Eating plant-based has done so many wonderful things for me that I would never go back.




      2
  13. Loved the video
    Nice wisecrack on websites that contain the word fact in them too
    As usual the more we research a topic the more questions arise
    I will make an effort to diversify my choice of grains to include non rice choices for my family.
    Unfortunately my Japanese mother would kill me if I stopped serving her white rice, so I will respect my elders on that one.
    Very sad to have to give up my frozen Trader Joe’s Hijiki Rice though.
    Thanks so much for all your hard work!




    4
    1. Stay tuned.

      Wednesday 7/26/17 Which Rice Has Less Arsenic: Black, Brown, Red, White or Wild? (7/26)

      Friday 7/28/17 Which Brands & Sources of Rice Have the Least Arsenic? (7/28)

      Monday 7/31/17 How to Cook Rice to Lower Arsenic Levels (7/31)




      2
  14. Does the brand Sea tangle, kelp noodles contain an unacceptable amount of non organic arsenic or other harmful compounds!? I hope not or I’m going to need to find a new base for pad thai, and my kelp mac and cheeze ;)




    0
  15. If you take a sky high point of view, you realize that human success poisons humans and everything else. The only safe places left long term are were humans have never been, which are none. Schools will teach you the opposite. Politicians will tell you the opposite.




    1
  16. Brown rice is on the daily dozen list under grains. In fact Dr Greger says, “some of my favorites: barley, brown rice, …”
    Sooo……..




    3
  17. This video raises so many questions for me. It mostly talks about US Rice. What about rice from other countries? If it’s contaminated less, is there a way that US citizens can just buy imported rice? Rice is a common food in many cultures… this is such a shame that it’s being contaminated. I also thought it was so interesting that Japan recommended just eating less of it, because they have a market for it (kind of reminds me of how people here in the US say “oh, just don’t eat as much red meat, but still eat it” — and this message is pushed because the meat industry is controlling.




    0
  18. I really appreciate all the info this website puts out…but it drives me crazy that they will post something…people have a million questions about it…but it seems like a lot of GOOD questions go unanswered by the NF team. For example with this one, did they not KNOW that people would be asking about the safety of BROWN rice, or rice from other countries etc?????? Again, I don’t want to sound ungrateful, but please include more facts, and expand on the info you are putting out.




    1
    1. Thank you for your comment. While our team is small and we do try and address many of the important questions that come in, we are unable to respond to them all at this time with the resources we have available. Please note that the Doctor’s Note below today’s video asks to “stay tuned” and also shows that the next video will be about which rice has the least amount of arsenic, including brown rice. The Doctor’s Notes are often helpful for giving an idea of what’s to come and also noting videos and content that may be related.

      I hope this helps. Thank you for your support and stay tuned!




      5
    2. That is the problem with these short videos. They just give a little information at a time so you have to be patient and wait for more info as the days progress.

      Under the video before the comments section is a list of the upcoming videos and what day they will air. Doesn’t anyone pay attention to that information?

      Realize that the 136 in 1 million is risk it is NOT ACTUAL CASES.




      7
    3. I agree with you MoreRicePlease, it is frustrating.. The other problem seems to be that people don’t read comments under current videos or preceding videos where NF fans have earnestly tried to answer questions and post resources. So basically we end up answering the same questions many times over. Also, the Doctor’s notes list of upcoming vids gives definite clues to the topics to be covered in the near future. (and questions answered) .




      3
  19. As Dr G often says … “let’s get some sense of perspective here!”

    I don’t think it is possible to eliminate all risk in everything we consume – if you tried to do that you would die of starvation because you would not able to eat anything …

    With that said, the impact of eliminating animal foods from your diet is (at least) on the scale of not smoking when it comes to chance of death by heart disease, cancers, diabetes, etc. (in my mind, there has been compelling research done to support this – see Campbell, Esseltyn, McDougall, Barnard, Ornish, and several others). To me, taking animal foods out of the diet is a huge step toward better health.

    But – should something like eliminating inorganic arsenic in rice be treated with equal urgency as eliminating animal products?

    It seems all studies never guarantee solid results — I would imagine someone eating what would be considered the perfect WFPB diet (with no added oils, sugars, salt, etc.) still has a very very small chance of developing some type of mortal disease/cancer/diabetes etc.

    So where does arsenic fall in all this? As someone earlier pointed out – if rice were so bad wouldn’t we see a strong correlation of confirmed deaths by arsenic from major rice eating populations around the world?




    8
    1. I agree, WJB. Perspective is important here. I have noted over the years that many people are far more concerned about artifical colors and flavors than they are about saturated fat, cholesterol, and not getting enough fruits, vegetables, and grains. If we eat healthy and avoid foods with concentrated amounts of toxins, we can stimulate the liver detoxification mechanisms (think crucifers and carotenoids) that help rid our bodies of heavy metals and other pollutants.




      1
  20. Also where is the citation in sources for this video for the review paper that in the video starts with the title of ‘arsenic accumulation in rice’? I can’t find it




    3
  21. I think the best way to look at this hypothetical problem of dealing with arsenic is to look at large population and ask the question about the health issues these populations are having. For example, look at China. Chinese people probably eat more rice than any other large group in the world per person. So, ask yourself, is their a higher rate of cancer and other diseases among Chinese compared to other populations that do not eat rice? People in Sweden, Norway, and Finland probably don’t eat very much rice. How to the cancer rates of Chinese compare to the Scandinavian countries? I don’t think you will see any difference. After all, you don’t see the high ranking rice eating leaders of the Chinese Republic dropping dead from cancer on a day to day basis do you? No ! People living in Mexico, Central America, and South America consume rice at every meal for the most part. Do you see these people dropping dead on the street like flies? No…. C’mon people use your common sense….don’t let all of this fear mongering, Y2K mentality bog you down.




    7
    1. John, what I got out of this is not so much how arsenic affects cancer rates in Asia. More to the point it’s how does high levels of arsenic affect cancer rates in those who eat a the SAD.




      2
    2. Ya know, i’m not going to worry about eating rice. It is my staple too. I don’t want to eat much pasta as it’s too fattening and they are now using Bromide in the flour instead of iodine and bromide interferes with the iodine level in the thyroid and can cause thyroid problems. I worry more about the the tuna coming from Japan—Alaska as it has radiation in it. The tuna from japan are contaminated and they swim to Alaska and are canned for us. They are not testing the fish in Alaska or telling us the truth. I am more worried about the tuna than the rice. I don’t eat tuna anymore becuz of it. I love rice. I mostly eat rice, veggies, fish, some carbs. I don’t have a great diet and i would probably starve if i didn’t eat rice.




      0
      1. Marie — You, myself, and 4 billion Chinese

        are going to continue to eat rice, not to mention

        all of the other Asians in the world and hispanics.

        And, take note, they will continue to live just as

        long as the rest of the world. However, if one

        is really concerned about rice, then eat Jasmine

        rice from Thailand. I don’t think Thailand has

        ever sprayed arsenic on any cotton crop like we

        did here in the US of A.




        3
  22. Thank you Dr Greger and your staff for all your research. I so look forward to seeing the future videos and transcripts about the Arsenic Rice issue. There must be some answers on what to eat.




    1
  23. If there was a study that showed the risk of diying of cancer due to polution in the city i guess it would be 10 times worse than eating rice, but nobody is going crazy running away from cites




    1
      1. Hey, i wonder if we can be immune to arsenic? A friend told me i can get “cat scratch fever” from my cats as i have scratches on my arms…you know how cats are….you pick them up and they cling to ya and accidentally claw ya. I told him i’ve had cats all my life and i have had lots of scratches and i think i am immune to it now as i never ever got sick.




        1
  24. I take one drop of liquid iodine with kelp daily because I don’t consume salt. Now I’m really worried about this supplement! It’s a Whole Foods brand – 150 mcg iodine plus 2 mg organic kelp (a natural source of iodine it says on the label). Should I toss this? What should you do for iodine then? Please help Dr. Greger!




    0
    1. Sorry Dr. G can’t respond directly to this. Hope one of his trusted moderators can help. You may want to see a previous video Dr. G made on this topic, along with some comments (see https://nutritionfacts.org/video/avoiding-iodine-deficiency-2/). There is also a Health professionals fact Sheet that NIH produced (see https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Iodine-HealthProfessional/). In addition, the consumption of some salt in the diet in inevitable, and some of that salt is iodized; if you take a multivitamin with minerals, you can further supplement your intake to make sure you get enough. I hope this helps!




      0
    2. I was taking 12 mg of iodine a day and then my holistic doc told me not to. He said he only reconmends taking one pill once a wk in spite of all i have read. He only takes one a wk, so i do this now. I have to ask him what happens if taking too much. He charges $20 for each email he answers so i try not to write much.




      0
    1. Tom, Dr. Greger has cited the relatively large amount of fermented foods like kimchi that are consumed in Japan as the primary factor behind the high rate of stomach cancer in that country. In fact, he had to add an entire chapter in his book on this topic in order for it to be published in Japan!




      2
          1. I read that soy is bad cuz of hormones, but that fermented is safe., so who knows? First butter was bad, now it’s good. Then eggs were bad, now eggs are good.




            0
      1. I have a hard time buying that. The Japanese don’t appear to consume more hot foods & drinks than Americans. I would guess probably the opposite, considering how much cold noodles & raw fish they eat.




        1
    2. Some studies have shown a lot of stomach cancer in countries where sodium content in foods is really high.
      But there is such a thing as moderation. In the desert southwest where I live, we have people passing out because they try to eliminate all salt in their diet. With the heat, and extremely low humidity (sometimes not measurable, we sweat out a lot of sodium. Need some, just not too much.




      1
  25. So what about the China Study about China? Chinese people have been eating rice for generations and generations as well as the Japanese people.




    0
    1. They weren’t eating rice grown in the southern United States.

      It’s not a problem with rice. It’s a pollution problem. Rice is just better at picking up arsenic than many other plants, so if it’s in the soil, it gets in the rice.




      6
      1. Thank you for the information on kelp and arsenic. It appears that there is little exposure from kelp capsules. I take it only two to three times a week.




        0
  26. Was no one else astounded in learning that moderator Dr. Ben eats mostly fruit???? How does one subsist on a mostly fruit diet? I would love to know what his daily meal plan looks like. If anyone knows, please comment. Hopefully Dr. Ben will see this also and respond at some point.




    0
    1. I dont know him and where did you learn it? Anyways you can live on mostly fruits with some B12 supplements if you can eat enough calories and can get enough different kind of quality ripe fruits, thats called frugivorism or fruitarianism(no vegetables but there is no essential nutrients in them that arent in fruits), see ultra runner Michael Arnstein and others pepoples who did it for years and have been healthy since, it makes sense since humans are a frugivorous species:

      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/paleopoo-what-we-can-learn-from-fossilized-feces/




      0
      1. Hi Julot,Below is a copy of Dr. Ben’s comments in an earlier discussion of arsenic in rice:

        As far as enjoyment goes, our whole family eats nothing but whole food plant based, but we all have our different styles. I eat nothing but fruit most of the time. My son eats mostly big bowls of beans, corn, and tomatoes. My daughter eats mostly stir fried veggies (without added oil). We all love what we eat, feel great, maintain our healthy body weight and don’t miss animal products at all.
        Lee




        0
    2. I had a very close 7th Day Adventist Doctor friend many yrs ago. She was a total vegitarian since she was 18. Did not eat dairy at all. Did not eat any animal products or fish. For one year her and her husband became Fruitarians. Then they went back to their vegitarian diet. At this time she is now 90 yrs old and in a nursing home. She has Dementia. Some Naturopaths say that we NEED cholesterol for the brain as the brain is 80 percent cholesterol. My theory is that she got Dementia becuz she did not get enough protein and cholesterol for the brain. Just my theory. She ate a “great” diet her whole life and ends up with Dementia.




      1
    3. It might be difficult to get all your minerals eating just fruit. Also, it might result in high triglycerides from a sugar overload-at least in some people.




      2
    1. Hi Jordan, the answer is in the question. It depence where the rice is growing. I don’t know the standards for organic farms at the USA. In Germany we have different organic labels waht means differend standards. One of the highest standard called “Demeter”, this means, the field has to be clean from all chemicals for nearly 10 years, the farmer can use only plant-based stuff to make the soil better, no slurry or other animal parts are allowed. Unfortunelly there is no “demeter” rice in Germany available because Germany isn’t a good place for rice ;-) Organic rice from other countries has the same Arsenic load like not organic rice, depence the soil….
      Like others also said here: use a good coocking mehtode to reduce the Arsenic and consume a whole plant-based diet, then you have a good chance to go away with a quite lightly :-)




      0
  27. Anyone try Mighty Rice ? It claims to be Arsenic Free. Would love advice and thoughts. I have been feeding my sweetie who has cancer, rice along with lots of veggies and homemade juices.




    0
    1. Hi TigerLilly, I’m not Dr. Greger but I found this for you on quora.com:
      If you only consume small amounts of rice bran oil, it should be okay. It usually has about 100-300 parts per billion of inorganic arsenic (the bad kind) although the exact numbers can vary a lot. The limit for drinking water is 10 ppb for inorganic arsenic. In the US, there’s no rule for solid food, but various international agencies have set limits of 100-200 ppb. Since oil is usually consumed in smaller amounts than solid food, it should be safer, even with higher arsenic concentrations.

      For me the better question is: Why do you like consum any oil?

      If you like, you will find a lot’s of videos on this site about the effects of oil consumtion on the body. Here is the LINK




      1
  28. If an individual eats an overall healthy plant-based diet….there is no sensible reason to be concerned about this type of information. A healthy body will deal with it and all contaminates found in produce, just fine*. The stress of “trying” to get away from it, is (arguably) worse. If someone already has disease….they probably shouldn’t be eaten very much cooked food at all.

    *exceptions do apply, although they are almost all silly troll based extremes trying to divert away from an intelligent approach.




    0
  29. Unfortunately the organic whole rice in Germany is the worst rice if the issue comes to Arsenic. I have watched a video where scientist from Ireland tried some cocking methodes to reduce Arsenic in rice. If you cocke your rice 1: 5 in water (1 part rice and 5 parts water of course ;-) ) the main Arsenic will be reduced about 50 %. But if you soak the rice over night in water, then rinse the rice until the water ist clear and then cock it with 5 parts of water – the Arsenic will be reduced by nearly 80 %. The professor Andy Meharg from the Queens University Belfast made this study (here the link I found: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/articles/2F1MDzyW55pg97Tdpp7gqLN/should-i-be-concerned-about-arsenic-in-my-rice)
    Maybe our star investigator Mr. Michael Greger and his team can check the truth behind the scences – P L E A S E ??? Thank you Michael and best greetings from Bavaria from Steffen




    3
      1. By lunch today there was another thought: Despite whole grain rice has more Arsenic inside (comparing to Basmati rice for example) it has also more fiber. Remembering the videos from Dr.Greger about the benefit of fiber in the gut (the mechanism to decrease cholesterol for example) could it be that the same mechanism is working for removing Arsenic from the body? Not only the fiber of the rice but also the fiber of the whole plant-based, low fat diet. If Arsenic is water soluble and the fiber in the gut is binding water to speed up the rest coming outside… I don’t think that Arsenic is able to say: No, not me…please let me stay in the body for a while because it is just so comfortable here.
        Not so by eating white rice with a big steak, washed down with a ice cold coke or beer – true to the motto: “Beef, It’s What’s Rotting in Your Colon” – it stays longer in your gut, so maybe the Arsenic is able to leave the train to reenter the body?
        Arsenic in rice is a bad thing but it is only one (!) part of my diet and I think if the rest of my body is healthy (my blood vessels as clean as they can be, so that my blood is flowing easely and so one…) one to two dishes a week of brown rice with other vegetables can not kill me… ;-)




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    1. according to the information we have in Europe it is the same issue, the public problem is on not organic farms they use all pesticides, they spray all slurry on the fields and Monsanto and Co. is over all (mostly in the pure countries like Pakistan and India) not concerning the health of the people but the money they can make.
      Like I wrote above – change the cooking methode and maybe use organic brown rice from Europe. But be careful, there are a lots of different “organic” labels in Europe and not all have a really good standard – the very best label is called “Demeter” it has the highest standard… ;-)




      1
      1. So the problem basically exists because of the use of pesticides right? That said eating organic rice would somehow avoid the arsenic problem? I’m from Germany and that’s because I’m asking. I’m only buying organic brown rice from the EU.




        0
        1. Hi Kaishiyoku, I’m from Germany, exactly Bavaria near Augsburg.
          “Stiftung Warenrest” has been testing about 20 diferent sorts of rice, some organic, some not. The organic rice has also contain Arsenic but not as much as the not organic one. Organic rice has been tested al as “good” but this say nothing at al because there is no official limit from the WHO for example. On the other hand, we in Germany consum not so much rice like the Japanes people, we are eating mainly potatos, pasta, bread. In my oppinion it would be more concerning if you would eat fish, meat and dairy and fast food or convinince food. It it more concerning to use plastic bottles, because of BPA…




          1
          1. Thank you for replying so fast. Ok so basically it’s better to consume organic rice. And you’re right, from the risk side BPA, dairy and such are more concerning.




            0
        2. Kaishiyoku,

          It’s not about organic or not exclusively, as the pesticides are and were used ~30 years ago forward are/were banned. With that said I agree with Heilprakiker always go organic…. assuming a lowered arsenic level. Why add other toxicants ?

          The problem is that the rice takes up the contents of the soil. You might ask for an analysis of the rice products from the company where you purchase rice. If they are really reputable they should be willing and able to give you the arsenic contents and you can choose those with the lowest levels.

          Please see the new video: http://nutritionfacts.us5.list-manage.com/track/click?u=c1bae6687e1e6ab175fb56913&id=ac94c3c47b&e=b7bee4794f for additional information. On the video are some of the levels, from multiple sources, to give you a reference point to judge what’s acceptable.

          Speaking of the EU…. see: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK304380/ and dependent on your location in the EU see: https://books.google.com/books?id=OtVZqdPHsm8C&pg=PA22&lpg=PA22&dq=european+use+of+arsenic+pesticides&source=bl&ots=UuoGuwdcw8&sig=IG2_qRj1N5jEdpDJEZZbo73cGXA&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjHm83TtrHVAhVlsFQKHb-tBEAQ6AEIWjAJ#v=onepage&q=european%20use%20of%20arsenic%20pesticides&f=false

          Do your homework and let others know your findings on this forum….

          Dr. Alan Kadish moderator for Dr. Greger http://www.Centerofhealth.com




          0
  30. Regular brown rice contains more inorganic arsenic than regular long grain white rice . About 53% more according to the US FDA 2014 risk assessment report (table 4.9).
    https://www.fda.gov/downloads/food/foodscienceresearch/risksafetyassessment/ucm486543.pdf

    The additional arsenic is presumably largely in the ban and thus bound to fibre. This would presumably affect its bioavaikability. According to this 2017 Korean study, “bioavailabilities in cooked white and brown rice were 31 % and 21 %, respectively”
    http://www.fasebj.org/content/31/1_Supplement/608.6.short

    By my calculations, arsenic uptake from regular long grain brown and while rice therefore would be broadly similar eg 100 X .31 = 31 for white rice compared with 153 X ..21 = 32.13 for brown rice.

    Consequently, I see no comparing reason to avoid the superior nutrient profile of brown rice (and its reduced risk of type 2 diabetes) in favour of white rice.

    Or am I missing something here?




    5
    1. it would be intreting to have some study about: how much is coming out, because of this more on fiber comparing white rice with brown rice. Also I like to see a study comparing omnivores intake of arsenic and other toxins with a whole plant-based, low fat diet and what is coming out at the end. For me there are to less studies on this topic. ;-)




      0
  31. so what was the conclusion of this video? it seemed to be going off on a tangent of comparing the rice industry to the chicken industry and not really making a final conclusion.




    1
  32. What about processed rice foods, like puffed rice cereal, or processed rice cereal??? Would the arsenic content be higher, or lower, since the rice is washed, ground up, and reformed?




    0
  33. Hi dayhikr,

    Here’s a useful paper I found which compares exactly the things you talked about.
    In case you can’t access it, I’ve put a quick summary of one of the tables at the bottom. In comparison to rice grains, this study found a range of 0.04–0.27 mg/kg, meaning that other rice products are likely to be roughly the same as rice grains.

    Concentrations of arsenic:
    Crisped rice: 0.21 mg/kg
    Puffed rice: 0.24 mg/kg
    Rice malt: 0.21 mg/kg
    Noodles: 0.12 mg/kg
    Sweets: 0.14 mg/kg
    Rice cracker: 0.28 mg/kg
    Amazake: 0.16 mg/kg
    Bran oil: 0.03 mg/l
    Vinegar: 0.05 mg/
    Mirin: 0.01 mg/l




    0
  34. We know by now that rice is not the problem: It is the soil that it is grown in that is polluted with heavy metals which end up in the rice. Now for a few words from our sponsor: Consumer Reports, Nov 2012:
    Rice = 17% of our exposure to inorganic Arsenic
    Fruit Juices = 18% of our exposure to inorganic Arsenic
    Vegetables = 24% of our exposure to inorganic Arsenic.

    So time to cross all these foods off our list, right?




    0

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