Doctor's Note

This is part of a series of “political” videos I’ve put together. Collaboration with the New Vectors of Disease was the previous one with a bunch more coming up. Why don’t I just “stick to the science”? When there are billions of dollars at stake, the body of evidence can be skewed and manipulated. Funders can determine which studies are performed, how they’re performed, and whether or not they get published at all. That’s why I think it’s important to take a broader view to account for the ways the scientific method can be perverted for profit.

Here are some examples:

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

To post comments or questions into our discussion board, first log into Disqus with your NutritionFacts.org account or with one of the accepted social media logins. Click on Login to choose a login method. Click here for help.

  • Mark

    Great bit of work here!

  • BB

    When I talk to others about my nutrition choices and I make the comparison between the tobacco industry’s deceptive marketing and the meat and dairy industry’s deceptive marketing, I can see people thinking. The light bulb goes on when they consider that they are being mislead by meat and dairy as we were mislead by the tobacco industry. People still smoke, but few deny that it is harmful. People may still eat animal products, but if they learn the facts and acknowledge that eating these products is harmful, it could be the first step toward change.

    • guest

      Vegan junk food promotion seems like a big problem as well. Chips, cookies, sugar and fat mixed together. Candy. Promotes addiction to junk food (itself). These products are so readily available, and cheap. You do not see kids reaching for a breast of chicken to get their fix, they go to the kitchen and start gorging on cookies, sugar, cakes, fried chips, processed flour products saturated with salt (and fat).

      • Jocelyn

        I don’t think any junk food – vegan or otherwise – were excluded from the message of this video…..

      • mark gillono

        personally, if people want to eat junk food, as long as it’s vegan, i say let them have at it. the torture and murder of innocent, helpless others who have no choice is a FAR greater issue than someone who is only harming themselves.

        • Dan

          My problem is how much easier it is to get junk food than a healthier alternative in our societies.

    • Han

      The tobacco industry found a new inroad. Be warned this article contain lies, big lies, half truths and corruptions:

      http://www.vapornation.com/vaporizer-health-benefits

    • Candace Maerie Dunn

      BB, this analogy is genius!! It will prove to be super helpful to so many of us I am sure! Yes, when people learn the facts… It will get them thinking. Food is just as much of an addiction as other drugs… The goal is, to get our minds as well as our hearts right.
      Change is coming… I just know it.

  • veganchrisuk

    I would normally say something like “You have to admire their deceit, underhanded methods, skulduggery”, etc, but increasingly I just find myself despairing over the way we put profit before everything else. Come on world, the sooner we do away with money (and dare I say religion), and make the pursuit of knowledge a priority to benefit us all, the sooner all this will stop. We’d have cured cancer years ago if obstacles like research money and big pharma profits weren’t in the way – the list is endless……..

    • apprin

      Research money and profit before health, yes. Religion? I think not. We must employ a foundation of morality in order to network higher ideals.

      • Wegan

        Religion does not equal morality and vice versa, but that is beside the point.

        • apprin

          I fully agree with the excellent points regarding religion and morality; however, it is a traditional barometer by which we can quantify or measure our moral stability as a culture. Without some sort of accountability and discipline structure, I fear that the culture of humanity would certainly spiral into a “do what is easy and feels good” state. Perhaps I should have referred to the concept of religion as a necessary evil of sorts. Managed by humans, religion will always exhibit flaws. In dealing with healthfulness, we accept a responsibility to lend care and hope to the human condition.

          • Guest

            I use the barometer of “treat others as I want to be treated”, that one works every time!

          • Jocelyn

            I use the barometer that other’s lives/well being/needs are as important as mine. The practice of “treating other living beings as I want to be treated” gets it right every time, no discipline required! I highly recommend it! :)

          • apprin

            Indeed, this does work every time. It is also, however, a highly refined discipline in itself and is a result of life in a nation founded upon religious principles.

          • veganchrisuk

            Again – not the place for a religious discussion………

          • Matthew Smith

            I love this website and think it could be part of a whole lifestyle to increase health. The religious live longer. Going to church once a week can lower your blood pressure for that whole week. People who have sex live longer. People who mediate live 14 years longer. Yoga is also very healthy. Gardening is healthy for you. Having a pet is good for you. Swimming is so healthy everyone should be recommended it. Reading is very good for you. Long term relationships with a big social web is better for you. Snuggling is very healthy. Having a family is very good for your health. People who are single can live fifteen less years than the married. More people have heart attacks Monday morning than any other day, showing the important of home. Construction toys and games can keep the mind young for every. I like the numbers reported in this health site and think they can keep my mind young.

          • Jocelyn

            Or maybe religion is founded on principles innate in all of us?

          • apprin

            I would like to believe and hope that you are correct. When I witness the modern beheadings, crucifixions, burnings, beatings, etc. I become less optimistic.

          • guest

            There is true religion and then there is fanaticism.

          • apprin

            Indeed, we live in a nation fanatic with anti-religious zeal.

      • veganchrisuk

        Hi Apprin – As much as I’d like to debate with you re your views, this is neither the time or the appropriate place, notwithstanding Wegan stole my thunder…….

        Thanks

        Chris

        • apprin

          Agreed. I once taught theology and could go on for weeks, but would of course be my only audience early on – LOL !!

          • veganchrisuk

            Hi Apprin – I just looked at your profile out of curiosity, and to say I am stunned would be an understatement. Have you really made the following comments in other discussions as follows;

            1. Racism isn’t a crime.
            2. That we should teach our children to carry and be skilled with firearms – that the public is safer because you carry everywhere you go, that you’re trained and ready to engage.
            3. You are a life long hunter but you don’t eat what you kill.

            If the above comments are yours, (I only looked at your most recent eight comments and that was enough), then I’m guessing I’ve just experienced my first right wing christian, and fully paid up member of the NRA from across the pond – on the one hand I’m very scared of you, but yet the psychotic side of my brain is asking for your hand in marriage as we are so diametrically opposed.

            Thank Not God for warm beer and wet English summers – I’d much prefer that than being shot by a child for taking away his Playstation….

            Chris

          • apprin

            Indeed, this is me. Racism is not a crime, the last that I inquired. This does not indicate that I admire or support racism in any form; however, it is not a crime. It is embraced by some cultures; however, it has no place in ours. Racism the right of those who chose this way of thinking. Indeed, I am of a racial minority. You are correct in that I indicated that society is safer with sound, skilled and well armed individuals that can and will oppose forces of evil. Note … “sound, skilled and well armed.” We do not all live in the Utopian dream world that some seem to envision. Yes, I have always hunted but am a devout vegetarian. I teach my children to hunt but also allow others to make their own decisions regarding consuming animals. I am also a pilot but personally have no wings. Please look further into and investigate the lives of others. One day you will have one of your own. By the way … Your point is??

          • veganchrisuk

            I have to disagree with your opinion. In most, if not all Western countries throughout the world, Racism is a crime. In the UK for example, racially aggravated offences (whereby you discriminate re a persons, race, ethnic origin, nationality, colour or religion), if convicted carrier a lengthier sentance, quite often the sentence is doubled.

          • apprin

            In some countries, race based action a crime, at least on paper; however, in others it is encouraged and embraced as a matter of national identity and pride. It is race based actions that are a crime, not the hysterical feeling or mindset of racism. Humans are quite diverse in their social posturing. It is not possible to identify racism since it resides and propagates in the mind. In several Asian, African and mid-eastern societies, for example, racial purity is regarded as national purity. In my own country, the very definition of racism has been skewed by social and political infighting, actually evolving into legislative power grabs. Race-based assault, for example, is prosecuted more aggressively than assault for another reason, diluting legal effectiveness for one and amplifying it for the other when assault alone is already illegal and equally damaging to any race. Racism is a matter of hysteria and personal opinion, thus it would truly take a mind reader to prosecute a person for racism. Thus, racism is not illegal. If so, it would take a jury of physics to prosecute the thought. The focus upon and indeed, the obsession with race has caused great race-based discrimination, resentment and crime. Not to mention, race hysteria has become a lucrative industry and quite an effective political lever of social and political manipulation. Society in my country walks on eggshells because of the unrealistic expectations and race obsession. Being of a racial minority, I attempt to steer clear and do not buy into race baiting and the hypnosis of race that seems to dominate media and minds.

          • veganchrisuk

            No, I completely disagree with you – your argument is very flawed. I have personally prosecuted, and convicted many defendants in the UK for racially aggravated/homophobic offenses. You certainly do not require a jury comprised of physics professors/mind readers to assess a defendants mens rea, a simple jury will suffice. For example, A attacks B. Prior to, during or following the attack, A makes reference to B’s ethnic origin by calling him a derogatory name, – the case is complete – racially aggravated. If you burn down a mosque and paint a nazi sign on the wall, it is a racially motivated offence. If you get drunk with your friends and go out one night looking for gay men to attack this is a homophobic attack. There are of course too many examples to mention.

            In addition, your argument is that we would need to know what the person was thinking to prove his/her guilt – this is where the police intervene and gain evidence via questioning, CCTV, covert methods, DNA, fingerprints, witness statements etc. This procedure is the same for all offences, it doesn’t just apply to racism as you suggest. Our whole legal system can be simplified as follows. Two people enter Court, one is telling the truth, the other is not. Or neither is telling the truth. If we knew prior to a trial whether A or B was the guilty party then we would not go to trial.

            I hope I have explained my position without over complicating the issue – failing this I think we should just agree to disagree.

          • apprin

            An excellent job of describing hate crime; however, racism resides in the mind and is not hate crime. hate crime is an action that may result from any variety of stimuli, only one of which is racist hatred. Racism is not an action but an opinion. Many racists never take criminal action and thus, never commit a crime. Racism in and of itself is not a crime. If it were, it would be impossible to prosecute without looking into the mind. I trust that this is simply explained and easily understood.

          • Thule

            You said:
            “If you burn down a mosque and paint a nazi sign on the wall, it is a racially motivated offence.”

            Anecdotally those two groups get along perfectly alright, Hitler even had them in their army. If instead you would say a Star of David on a mosque, yep… things would get horrible — But I mean most surely for the Jews living in the area. Some people constantly stand out by their violent ways, others not.

            I saw that you are scandalised by people having arms, so thought Hitler too, and hurried to take all weapons from the population. Any unarmed population are powerless, consider the problem of giving the monopoly of violence to the state (and the criminals, who won’t be squeamish about breaking the law of possessing weapons) In Switzerland the population is highly armed, and you don’t have a high crime rate because of is, so in Andorra and other places. :)

            If you have a violent population in a given place, they will be violent regardless if they have firearms or not, in fact the more criminally minded, will get them, in the knowledge that they are safe to attack anyone else, who won’t be able to defend themselves from their attack.

            Also, crucially, individual rights, among them stands prominently the right to defend your own life.

          • veganchrisuk

            Don’t misquote me, I did not at any point write that I was scandalised by firearm possession. You also don’t except my example of a racially motivated offence and have substitued your own. I’ve only been in the legal profession for two decades so why would you. Finally, if you are from Switzerland, although not a member of the EU, I believe (not certain) you are signed up to the Human Rights Act, therefore Article 2 of the Act applies to you, “A Right to Life”.

            Lets just agree to disagree.

    • Dasaniyum

      So…more socialism and less capitalism?

      • veganchrisuk

        Viva la revolution…….

      • Thule

        That entails to concentrate even more power in a few people (the ones governing) Ugly. No one should have the right to confiscate anything from other people, nor hamper their economic freedom. But don’t imagine for a second that I support corporativism either, which is more of the same, you only get that with powerful lobbies and the state working together. Devil’s marriage.

    • jazzfeed

      IMO, mutated food plants and religion are the two greatest frauds in all the history that I’m aware of. You dare say, I second.

  • Arjan den Hollander.

    I guess we can conclude Dr. Greger is not a turn the other cheek kind of guy ^^

  • Plantstrongdoc M.D.

    In 20 years we will look at meat eaters the way we look at smokers today – we will accept occasional social meat eating, but everyday use is a no go…….and the meat eaters will have to dine outside :-)

    • Paul Spring

      I say that too, but it may just be wishful thinking on my part. Poor eating habits are so ingrained in our cultures that to deny people meat denies their identities. All I hope for is that plant-based whole-food folks will achieve a place in society where we have the same options and access to the foods we want that the carnivores have. That we are paying the medical bills due to their addiction is troubling though.

      • rajkhosla

        yes, infact the meat requirements of several countries are going up and up! I guess people there are closing their eyes to the deadly diseases around them and just yell…”My chicken nuggets please”…!

      • Paul Spring

        Its hard to know what people would do if they really understood what their food is doing to them. There are very effective sources of misinformation that so confuses people that they don’t know what to think.

      • Dasaniyum

        I agree. I would really like society to make room for us herbivores. It’s just like with smoking. A while ago, smoking was so deeply ingrained into the nation that there was almost no room for non-smokers to breathe. Today, people have recognized the harmful effects of smoking and have placed restrictions on smoking to give room for non-smokers.

      • Thule

        That’s why they should pay their own medical bills, if you willingly keep a diet and/or smoke, which most surely will make you seriously ill, you would be in your right, but also be responsible for the consequences.

        You see, if people would need to pay for their heart interventions, medications and so on, they will be much more receptacle to the link between diet and health. And insurances will go sky high if you keep endangering yourself like that.

        There is also the matter if we are in our right to torture and kill animals as is being done, clearly we don’t. And far from being necessary, is in fact the gateway to all kind of diseases that plague the western world.

        • Paul Spring

          Very compelling argument. As a person who believes in universal free healthcare it presents a dilemma. I believe people should be responsible for the consequences of their actions but I have to draw the line when it comes to society needing to come to the aid of fellow humans – at least the compassionate society I want to live in. Withholding life-saving medical treatment is more reprehensible and cruel than having to pay for the foibles of people who make bad health decisions.

          • Thule

            Think how we would kill two birds with one shot (nasty reference sorry!) :D

            Well, think of this, people will be much more conscious about their actions — If you eat horribly knowingly, you know you can get into a lot of trouble. And definitely the silent victims of all this, what about the staggering number (trillions) of animals that live and die in horrible conditions? If you mention compassion, there is nothing good for anyone in the present deal, animals die, people die also because of it, and I don’t know if you already heard, but the industry that singlehandily emit by far more emissions, is this industry. It is in fact not sustainable. We need to cut this somehow. That entails to educate people, people are receptibe when they aren’t treated as children, grownups must understand the weight of their actions, and be responsible. Otherwise we keep contributing to a culture of carelessness, that only favors these criminal industries, and the ones that get beneficed by the results (healthcare, drug companies) that are extremely happy with the situation, and for that reason all of these groups control the state with their lobbies.

            Finally, while charity is perfect, (you would do perfectly right if you donate for free healthcare for others) but another matter is if others decide where your money should go, I defend your right to decide that by yourself.

          • Paul Spring

            I agree very much with what you are saying but from a bigger picture I would draw the line on punishing people by withholding medical treatment (which is in effect would happen to the poor who can’t afford medical insurance). The state of being morbidly ill is bad enough and if we,as humans, don’t care for each other, how are we going to then profess to care for the animals. We have gotten people to stop littering, stop smoking, wear seat belts and helmets, recycle – we have to use the tools of persuasion, protest, democracy (such as it is), not cruelty to change society. People like to complain, but how many of us will call in to a talk show, write to a newspaper or confront a restaurant chef or grocery store manager (e.g the Whole Foods hypocrite “vegan” CEO)? We are like sheep (without having to fear being turned into a lamb chop)

          • Thule

            And I agree with you at large too, you mention the problem of poor people and medical insurance, I agree they should be helped, but it must be voluntary. See in one side, the state heavily subsidize these industries, so poor people (and everyone else) gets stuffed in what should be expensive if they were to pay the real price. Instead the whole society is forced to pay these industries, and society gets ill because of it. To top it, society is also forced to pay for all the medical treatments, another industry that is happy to keep with the status quo.

            Are we really helping people keeping these things going? Even if they get free medical treatment we aren’t stopping
            the diseases, the suffering and dying.

            What you mention there, about tobacco, littering etc, was done by laws. Direct prohibitions. Good luck getting meat and related industries in that situation. We need to get people informed — battling against the fact that everyone lives in a
            sea of confusion, those industries have billions to promote themselves.

            Well, nothing new. :(

          • Paul Spring

            Not really following you. I’m not talking about private health insurance – Obama Care is a give-away to these corporations. I believe “society” is “us”. I do want to look after my fellow human beings and am willing to pay for it. I want to organize the way we “govern” ourselves in a compassionate way. We don’t govern ourselves now and “government” is not my representative.
            The littering laws didn’t change people’s behavior – other than Arlo Guthrie in Alice’s Restaurant, I don’t know anyone fined or jailed for littering. It was social pressure that did it with the help of good propaganda. This can work for changing society’s view on food as well. Its just much harder.

    • unf13

      All the studies concerning detrimental effects of meat have been mostly observational. And the researchers have never really taken into account what kind of meat people had been consuming processed or not. It makes a big difference though it’s like comparing chips and fresh potatoes.
      Also, there’s a continuing scientific debate between low-fat and low-carb diets proponents and there are conflicting studies results supporting both sides.
      There are also conflicting studies results about vegetarians posessing better health. Most vegans and vegetarians are generally more health concious meaning they usually have less smokers and more physically active people among them. Also they are predominantly much skinnier than the average man. So you never know what factored most into that statistics they had less diabetes, strokes etc. like in the adventist’s study and the like.
      We shouldn’t forget there are a lot of longlivers meateaters and even some cultures who based their diet on meat consumption.

      • Plantstrongdoc M.D.

        You proved the point of the video :-)

        • unf13

          Oh yes I’m an agent of the food corporations :-) If you want any science backing my view you can take a look at this http://authoritynutrition.com/8-ridiculous-myths-about-meat-and-health/

          • Plantstrongdoc M.D.

            To be fair, I dont think that there are sufficient data to claim that 100% plantbased is better than say 95% plantbased, but for some people 100% is easier. On the other hand, I think that there sufficient data to claim that a mostly plantbased diet is better than a standard diet. In science you sometimes have to accept probable evidence, because definitive proof is impossible to obtain. A study proving that a plantbased diet is the best, will take 80-100 years. There will always be a lot af confounders when you study people in the real world. Of course processed meat is worse than lean meat (but broccoli is better…)

          • unf13

            I think that the most balanced diet should be close to that of primitive cultures of some wild places still existing on earth. Basically those diets are based on plants but include some unprocessed animal foods. That way you don’t have to take your b12 pills or be worried about adequate ferritin levels in your blood if you are a female etc.
            At the same time you get the minimum of saturated fats while getting some benefits that animal products still offer.

          • Filipe Coimbra

            can you tell me one (or more) benefit of consuming animal “products”that a plant food don’t give? (sorry, my english is not great)

          • Matthew Smith

            Dr. Greger has a video here on supplements. http://nutritionfacts.org/video/vitamin-supplements-worth-taking/ Animals give more complete protein than plants, and cholesterol is required in the human diet in small amounts, though Vegans seem to live without it. Soy is as complete a protein as meat, and the body can make some cholesterol. He says Vegans need to supplements with three minerals, B12, Vitamin D, and Iodine. He says meat eaters need to supplement with seven. There is a link here on Vegans. http://nutritionfacts.org/topics/vegans/

          • Filipe Coimbra

            All of you arguments are totally wrong (the complete protein story, the cholesterol story, the vitamin D, iodine and mineral story) when we talk about whole food plant based diet (and not simple vegan diet). The vitamin B12 is other story for ALL OF US in a sanitized world. Try to learn a little bit more

          • unf13

            Well, what about b12 or vitamin D (if no adequate sun exposure is available)? Can you get them from plalnts food? Or just take a look at RDA of calcium or zinc or iron and try to calculate how many kilograms of ‘leafy greens’ a day you must consume to get the adequate amount.

            For example, take a look at this video about zinc deficiency http://nutritionfacts.org/video/vegetarian-zinc-requirements/

          • Filipe Coimbra

            First of all: I try to study and learn more about physics, chemistry, mathematics, biology, biochemistry, human physiology and anatomy, pathophysiology and human nutrition almost every day. So, everything I know is not only from nutritionfacts.org (i love this source by the way). Vitamin D – get some sun exposure, period. If you can’t, then maybe you will have to take supplements. Vitamin B12 – unless you eat some dirty stuff here and there, then you have to take supplements. Neither of this situation have something about meat vs plant-eaters discussion.
            About the mineral issue – you will NOT have any problem with calcium, zinc, iron, or any other mineral if you eat a WHOLE FOOD PLANT BASED DIET, choosing the best that you have around you (i’m not talking about eat a simply vegan diet).

          • unf13

            Ok, could you tell me how i can get the adequate calcium amount (1000 mg) from a whole food plant based diet on a daily basis? Eating 70 grams of poppy seeds or 140 grams of sesame seeds is not an option for an everyday life. Can you imagine how much KILOGRAMS of broccoli one has to consume daily to get his calcium?

            Did you watch Dr. Greger’s video about zinc deficiency? http://nutritionfacts.org/video/vegetarian-zinc-requirements/

            Haven’t you ever heard about anemia in female vegetarians?

          • Filipe Coimbra

            check this: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3854817/ and then read the references too, to have a broader view about the topic.

          • Daniel Wagle

            Just ONE tablespoon of blackstap molasses has 20% of the RDA for calcium. There are many good plant sources of calcium, such as unhulled sesame seeds, green vegetables, almonds, beans and even oranges. Many plant foods have plenty of iron- including blackstrap molasses. Whfoods here lists the best sources of iron, and none of them are from animal sources. http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=nutrient&dbid=70 Eggs and dairy are NOT good sources of iron. Salmon and chicken don’t have that much iron. Maybe beef does, but the heme iron in it may be more absorbable, but it is more toxic. Plant iron is more absorbable if a person takes it with Vitamin C.

          • SH

            Anemia is complicated. i have been anemic for 20 years, taking iron pills on and off. I was anemic even when eating red meat. I now need less iron for two reasons:
            1)as a vegan my periods are no longer heavy – dramatic change
            2)as a vegan I am not eating dairy which interferes with iron absorption
            That’s just my personal experience.

          • Thule

            You can get plenty of calcium from plants like kale. You keep talking happily about heme iron, the worse possible version for humans, because we cannot regulate how much is absorbed, and excess is as problematic as deficiency, while we handle perfectly alright how much we absorb from plants (as herbivores we evolved to handle that source). Also heme iron is strongly linked to intestinal cancer. Nothing like that happens with iron from plants.

          • Matthew Smith

            Thank you very much for this comment. How do you recommend people diminish the impact of their meat eating? Is it with beans? Or nuts? Dr. Greger has presented data that the only people in the country who are fit enough to pass both BMI tests and blood pressure tests are vegans. I did not believe that being a vegetarian could make you live longer (for instance, the Lora Dunning Adventists say they live about 4-8 years longer than other Californians but that is the same benefit as going to Church and being Pious and they live shorter then the people of San Francisco), until I saw this site. I can see that vegetarians are much healthier. How do you suggest to eat plants to get rid of having eaten a little meat? If Milk causes cancer, then does that mean only Vegans are testable for cancer causing foods? What is the maximum meat you would allow? I know Chicken and Turkey are low in saturated fat, but they are rather high in Cholesterol. Is it possible to get the most with Chicken and Turkey, knowing that Dr. Greger says these are the most fattening meats and contain the fattening chicken virus? I have always been quite a bit overweight despite great physical ability. Should I blame the milk and poultry? Much less than one percent of the country is vegan. They must be very studied! I think we could eat walnuts and macademia nuts and pistachios, dark chocolate, and beans, beans, beans to live forever. Matcha, whole grains, berries, fresh fruits and fresh vegetables are really great for health. Is there a way to study that eating the healthiest foods suggested here could cause the best life? Thank you so much for your help.

          • Once you understand the best science and its clinical application you have the foundation for success. The two resources I recommend as starters are Doug Lisle’s YouTube video, How to Lose Weight wiithout losing your mind” and Jeff Novick’s DVD, Calorie Density: How to Eat More, Weigh Less and Live Longer. Both Doug and Jeff have worked with John McDougall for a number of years. Jeff was the first person I ever saw who linked exercise to calorie density. You can be a fat vegan or a thin omnivore but if you want to go on a successful journey to lose fat start with those two resources. Good luck.

          • Plantstrongdoc M.D.

            And Michael Klaper: Food That Kills (you can find it on youtube)

          • veganchrisuk

            Jeff Novak is a funny guy – see also this from Jeff Novak

            http://youtu.be/GfBKauKVi4M?list=PLB36821E9F8765784 re The Mediterranean Diet
            http://youtu.be/1pD3-j0GWdo?list=PLB36821E9F8765784 re Fat Free Oil (That’s 100% Fat)
            http://youtu.be/lbALgjmZUek

            There’s plenty more…….

          • Paul Spring

            Its easy to tell someone else what to do but there are some common sense concepts to think about.

            Forget about the weight – focus on how you feel, your quality of life. Do you have more energy, can you perform the physical and mental activities that you desire?

            If you do have more energy – are you taking advantage of it and being more active?

            Do the arithmetic. Fat has almost twice the calories as carbs and protein. Fat that is trapped in whole foods is less available to your body than added oils. So just stop the olive oil. Read the labels – stay under 3 grams per serving.

            Give yourself a fighting chance. Go 100% no-oil vegan for just two months. Its not something you can just “ease” into – but two months? Give yourself a present!

            Stay away from challenging social situations initially. Recovering alcoholics don’t go to bars. On the other had, proclaim your personal choice to friends and relatives. Its your life.

          • Paul Spring

            I believe that while it is true, for ethical reasons we can’t design the perfect human experiment to confirm 100% plant-based is better than 95%, there are other “inputs” that a reasonable person can consider and come to the conclusion that eliminating all meat is best. The biological in-vitro experiments, the biochemistry and genetics should all be considered too. And then there’s the bigger picture – is eating meat good for the health of society? Resources like the movie “Cowspiracy” barely touch on individual health issues and rely on simple arithmetic to put the nail in the coffin of the claim that eating animals has a place in our world.

          • Jocelyn

            Oh man, too good…don’t you see? You ARE proving the point of the video!

          • HemoDynamic, M.D.

            Your cited source is farcical at best.

          • unf13

            Ok, take a look at this and share your thoughts if you don’t call it ‘farcical’ too http://www.sciencebasedmedicine.org/death-as-a-foodborne-illness-curable-by-veganism/

          • HemoDynamic, M.D.

            Maybe you should immerse yourself in Medicine and become a physician that has to treat chronic disease. Then you might gain the understanding of why we as physicians that have truly treated chronic disease support eating a whole food plant based diet as the best diet we know of to date for preventing, stopping and reversing chronic disease. That’s the reason that Kaiser, the largest Managed Health Care Organization in the United States in 2013 made a position statement that states A Plant Based Diet as the best diet to achieve the healthiest body you can obtain. http://www.thepermanentejournal.org/issues/2013/spring/5117-nutrition.html

            It has been my, and many others experience (interesting it correlates directly with the plethora of evidence supporting a plant based diet) that our patients can prevent, stop and reverse their chronic diseases (eg. Cardiovascular disease such as CAD, Carotid stenosis, Peripheral Vascular disease, Diabetes, and Carpal Tunnel syndrome, Rheumatoid arthritis, Lupus, Crohns disease, Ulcerative colitis, diverticulitis, Cancer, Fibromyalgia, reduce chronic pain, all the while losing weight, increasing energy, improving sleep and ultimately improving their quality of life) if they follow a plant based diet. No other diet/lifestyle (and I have seen them all) has EVER shown all these benefits.

            If you want to eat animal products then eat them for your own enjoyment but remember you are increasing your risk of all the chronic disease I have previously listed and more.

            And who knows maybe you will be one of the lucky ones and be at one of the far ends of the bell shaped curve and live an amazing life while feeding your body high levels of poisons; but please do not tell others that ‘poison’ is good for your body because it’s what you like to ingest.

          • Plantstrongdoc M.D.

            This is hands-on experience! As good as it gets.

          • Matthew Smith

            Thank you. To join your thought, is it realistic to ask people to be Vegetarians or Vegans? It is cheaper and more efficient for the world. This diet, administered at any time and for any length of time according to this site, could dramatically heal the sick. It could save those who are elderly millions of dollars. It could save millions of people from the retirement homes. It could postpone death save the nation (like Medicare) tens of billions of dollars. It could instill mobility and self-sufficiency at any age for the baby boomers. While the plant based diet could reverse heart disease, one half of heart attacks occur without warning and so eating less meat should be a priority for the elderly. I am sure the plant based diet helps with mental illness and substance abuse as well, which affects 40 percent or more of the country. The population centers of the world that are known for longevity are based on vegetarianism, like Lora Dunning, California, and Okinawa, Japan. Perhaps the longest living of them also eat peanuts, considered a nut and a bean. If beans and nuts could be a part of every diet. If dark chocolate was made a part of the diet, with it reducing the risk of heart attack and disease by half. I think there is a way to get the benefit of eating plants and only plants for those like me with deficient will power and it is with things like beans and nuts and tea. Probiotics, lemons, cherries, green tea, and berries could limit the affect of meat and dairy and add to the impact of the plants we do it. Knowing the benefit of veganism, why do you think people like me still eat meat? It is not for pleasure and I am wary of losing childhood tastes. Thank you very much!

          • Thule

            Did you try meat substitutes? The market has more and more products, now there are “meats” out here that have fool even chefs.

            And from there I think you should try good WFPB books, with all kind of recipes.

          • Matthew Smith

            Thank you! I can’t keep my appetite for the vegan diet very well, but that is starting to change. With your suggestion I’ll be really having a great time here and with this diet in no time.

          • Charzie

            Sorry to butt in but I just want to give all you said some personal validation. I was morbidly obese and unhealthy, and at 58 I was saddened, but not surprised, to be diagnosed with diabetes too. Ironically, it was probably the best thing that could have happened to me! Reading about the new drugs I had to add to an ever increasing list, I learned that they themselves could be nearly as bad as diabetes. In the few months of taking them, I not only felt worse than ever, I also quickly gained another 20 lbs, pushing me over the dreaded 300! Something inside me snapped and spurred me on a determined mission to find a better alternative! All research pointed me to the critical aspect of diet, but surprisingly, not the one recommended by the Diabetes Association, but a strictly whole foods, plant based diet. Even though I never consumed much meat or dairy, I stopped eating all animal products completely, and eliminated anything processed, including any free fats or oils. My simple rule was eat it as it comes from nature! Maybe extreme, but simple and straight-forward to start out. I won’t say it was easy at first, because instead of easing into it, I dove into it! I could barely believe in less than 3 weeks my blood sugars were below what is considered diabetic and I was able to quit taking the medications! I was not only thrilled, I was ecstatic because the weight I had battled my entire life was dropping off too! I began to notice other positive changes happening…like a reduction in pain from arthritis and fibromyalgia and other issues, my blood pressure dropped to normal and my cholesterol, always high was steadily declining! I was mentally clearer and just felt so much better overall, it was amazing! My tastes even changed and I lost the compulsive cravings that an overfed, but under-nourished body tries to compensate with! For the first time EVER I could pretty much eat all I wanted, when I wanted, and continue to lose weight! I always start with foods that are nutrient dense but low in calories, and proceed from there, keeping my intake about 50/50 plant/starch…of the right kinds of course. Five years later, I weigh half as much as when I started on this fantastic journey, my health has improved in so many ways, no more pills, and I feel so much better than I can remember! I have NO questions at all about the best diet, and wish I had been able to do it ages ago! Better late than never though! I certainly don’t expect to live forever, I just want to make the best of my allotted time and be around as long as possible in good health! Quality over quantity. (But I’ll take both! LOL)

          • HemoDynamic, M.D.

            That is fantastic! Thanks for sharing. It’s what I see everyday in my office when my patients adopt a low fat, wholefood, plant based lifestyle. I’m glad you got your quality of life back.
            Congratulations!!!!!!!!!

          • Matthew Smith

            Congratulations at beating diabetes. Dr. Greger said here the best foods for diabetes are hibiscus tea, cinnamon, flax seed meal, amla, and beans. These are lifelong treatments for the disease. When I was 23 I was put on a medicine that made me gain over 30 pounds in a year and developed pre-diabetes, despite running five miles a day. I like that there are plant food options to treat that illness should it ever come back. Generic older medications eliminated that side effect for me. I found fenugreek helps me lose weight. This site used to seem to have a vegan weightlifting audience, I am glad others have found hope here.

          • Paul Spring

            I did – the guy’s totally biased. I looked at a key reference (by Barnard et. al.) that he claimed disproved the benefits of a vegan diet – just the opposite. He’s either a liar or just plain ignorant.

        • unf13

          And if you don’t deem Dr. Weil to be the agent of the System check out this info about low-fat vs low-carb.http://www.drweil.com/drw/u/QAA401531/Low-Carb-or-Low-Fat-Diet.html

          • FollowTheMoney

            for sure, “Dr.” Weil is a supplement pusher!

      • Thea

        re: “…some cultures who based their diet on meat consumption.”
        Yes, but those cultures are not as healthy as the cultures which base their diets on plants. You can learn more about that from videos on this site as well as from PlantPositive.com.

        re: “… there are a lot of longlivers meateaters…”
        I don’t know about “a lot of”. There certainly are some. Just as their are some smokers who live to be 100 and smoked a pack a day every day of their adult lives. That doesn’t make smoking healthy. The point is: the existence of some long-lived meat eaters (or short-lived vegans for that matter) is irrelevant when you are trying to figure out what is healthy to eat and what is not for the majority of humans.

        re: “…conflicting studies results about vegetarians posessing better health…”
        You can certainly find conflicting studies, but as Dr. Greger shows, when you analyze the validity of the various studies and when you look at all of the studies as a whole, then you see that the body of evidence is pretty clear – as clear as any question when it comes to nutrition and human health anyway. It is pretty rare to impossible to get 100% proof of anything. The point is: we have enough very strong evidence to be able to say with pretty good conviction that a whole plant food based diet is the healthiest diet for normally developed humans. (ie, baring some genetic deficiency, etc).

        I would encourage you to watch more videos on this site as well as the PlantPositive videos.

        • unf13

          Thank for your comment.

          Nobody to date disputes the benefits of whole plant foods as well as the harm of processed foods (be it animal or plant based whatever). But to say that animal food has only detrimental effects on the human health is wrong. Anything is bad if we overconsume it.

          Most people in the Western societies have been historically meat eaters. So the increase of diabetes, strokes, cancer cases etc. in the last 50 years cannot be solely attributed to meat and dairy! It’s just ridiculous!

          I’m grateful to Dr. Greger for his invaluable work and information. But any information should be considered critically.

          Could you (or someone) take a look at this Dr. Greger’s ‘The Leading Causes of Death’ critique and give your opinion?

          • Thule

            You said:
            “Most people in the Western societies have been historically meat eaters. So the increase of diabetes, strokes, cancer cases etc. in the last 50 years cannot be solely attributed to meat and dairy! It’s just ridiculous!”

            It goes from more than 50 years now, and I have the answer, meat consumption and other animal products skyrocketed as societies became richer, and then you see the direct relation between the increased consumption and the degenerative diseases climbing alongside.

            Check this very site, for example during WW II in places like Norway that were left without meat during those years got all these diseases down, and got back where they were as the “normal” diet resumed. I encourage you to check the details.

      • Wegan

        I like the “health conscious vegan” argument. Well yah, we know that meat and dairy is unhealthy so we don’t eat it. Because it is unhealthy. Hello? And we are generally skinnier and healthier for all the reasons you find on this website.

        • unf13

          I mean that if you reduce processed junk foods and eat whole plant foods as well as unprocessed meat and dairy (in moderation), exercise and drink enough water etc. you stand a good chance to be quite healthy. That way you don’t have to take your b12 or iodine pills etc.

        • unf13

          And to be fair, most male (especially raw) vegans often bear some resemblance with Auschwitz inmates. Yes, we have some vegan soy-based bodybuildres (who are in fact generally thinner than their meat eating counterparts). But what if i don’t want to consume soy?

          • Veganrunner

            Oh goodness. You are obviously new to the concept of WFPB. Keep reading.

          • HemoDynamic, M.D.

            Really?! Auschwitz?! Your claim is ludicrous!

            Below are the images of:

            First: Billy Simmonds 2009 Mr. Natural Universe

            2nd: Patrick Baboumian broke world record for most weight carried 30 feet in 2013 Worlds Strongest Man Competition. 555kg (1,224 lbs). He beat all the Meat eaters!!

            Lastly an image of some WWII concentration camp inmates.

            Really?!? You see a resemblance there? And don’t tell me you are using hyperbole. It’s bombastic conjecture.

            If you really want to know more, read and watch this website in it’s entirety and look up the links and educate yourself about the peer reviewed science. On this journey you will answer all your questions you have stated here and discover all the current science about which is the best lifestyle to participate in to become the healthiest you can be.

  • Paul Spring

    Read “Merchants of Doubt” – it will make you sick. The same “deniers” have been at work since the early 50’s. Tobacco, pesticides, ozone depletion and now, global warming. The book details the meticulous strategy employed by corporations and their champions over the years.

    • SeedyCharacter

      Also read “Appetite for Profit” by Michele Simon and “Food Politics” by Marion Nestle–both exposing the corrupt politics of food. The problem is that the majority of people who read these books are members of the “choir” and our numbers and influence are small. I hold out some hope that sources such as NF.org and Center for Science in the Public Interest (they publish the magazine Nutrition Action and do nutrition lobbying) are making a positive difference over time.

    • Paul Spring

      My hope is that the “choir” will expand – but its awfully deflating to stop at a state-run rest area on the interstate. I believe it will take an visionary entrepreneur to start a chain of PBWF restaurants with lots of incredible tasting no-oil options to expose to the public. That there are millions of recipes out there is great – but our food “culture” is defined by restaurants. Any enterprising chefs out there want to jump in?? :-)

      • Charzie

        I have to comment because of a revealing experience I had today! Just for some quick and simplistic background, I am what is generally considered a WFPB lowfat vegan. Other than places like this, or local meet-up groups, sadly, it is a lonely endeavor in our society, though in my case, a totally worthwhile and life-saving one. Since as Paul mentioned, it isn’t easy to find suitable food when eating out, and combined with monetary issues, it almost forces me into eating at home. I accept it, but I’m not necessarily thrilled about it! It is nice to have options!
        I know there are a few places I can go to eat the foods I want, but the rare occasions I would be be going out to eat would be social ones, which would mean majority rules, and I am a minority of one. My dietary “restrictions” really seem to make everyone uncomfortable, since their nod to “health” consists of ordering a diet soda with their meal. I wish they would do better, but I am not there to judge! I am there to enjoy myself as well as they are! I decided quite a while ago that since I eat out so rarely, that I could relax my standards somewhat without abandoning my principles entirely, but apparently even that wasn’t enough to eliminate their issues, since there was always questions and commentary…and it rarely felt positive no matter how I tried to steer it.

        In an unintentional conversational insight today, I learned that the group continues to indulge, minus the ‘stick in the mud’, me. (My words) I’m not angry, not even hurt, as I get it, but it is kind of disconcerting. I can’t help but feel if there were better options available and I didn’t have to single myself out from the crowd, I wouldn’t have to be in the same position. These are both family and friends, and otherwise good people who just don’t seem to get it! I do because I was one of them not so long ago! We need so many changes I don’t even know where to focus, but glad that I learned in time!

  • Laloofah

    A quote I just saw today seems to go well with this video: “A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.” ~Saul Bellow

    • Plantstrongdoc M.D.

      Yes – and: “There are two ways to be fooled. One is to believe what isn’t true; the other is to refuse to believe what is true.” Søren Kierkegaard

      • Laloofah

        An excellent one indeed.

      • Margaret Heffernan calls it ‘Wilful Blindness’. Her TED talk is great. And her book is on my reading list.

        • Plantstrongdoc M.D.

          Well said

  • Will Kriski

    Great research. When you actually read and understand each study design it’s easier to decide what to accept, but the average person is uninterested and usually too busy to do this and they like to hear good things about their bad habits.

  • Merio

    You see… those corporations act completely out of control.

    It is simply impossible to trust them.

    I think it’s time to think how to split up those Agencies of diseases and make them unable to spread lies on lies on lies.

  • apprin

    Another wonderfully assembled notification of truth by Dr. Greger. This brings to mind the Jonathan Gruber situation wherein the public is led to support the sophisticated campaign to undermine public health interventions through misunderstanding and meticulously crafted ignorance. Thus. “the stupidity of the American voter” becomes the catalyst. The difference is, unlike mosquitos, the U.S. government can afford the top notch P.R. firms to present their biased research findings. Thus, we have the unholy alliance between food manufacturers (processors), the USDA (cattle, dairy, egg, poultry, etc.) and the FDA. I see countless parallels to the tobacco battles of the 1950s through the 1980s. We even endured a “White Coat Project” of sorts. Mr. Gruber has become a hero of supplying misinformation, use of conflicting information and hiding negative data, leaning upon the thin wedge of doubt supplied by lap dog media. Indeed, we could elevate human health to remarkable levels, were we not such darned “stupid American voters.”

  • Eric Triffin

    I have been calling processed foods and their advertising as vectors for obesity. They manipulate the physical strings of addictivity (fat, salt and sugar), with the psychological ones through advertising and economic ones through tax subsidies to growing 80% of our crops for animal agriculture. Advertising is the viral vector that has made fast and processed foods infectious leading us into an obesity “bubble” due to false foods becoming toxic assets.

  • Ted Crystal

    The Universities that do the studies would not be able to without the grants from industry. This leads to the bias and slanted results that you point to in your vlog. Yet, most journalists, bloggers and authors cherry pick data from these studies to make their particular case. How do you, who use these studies, feel confidant in their conclusions based on the mis- and disinformation, and then file your report. We all look to you for the truth in nutrition. Please re-confirm your belief in the data so we all can rest easy.

  • Matthew Smith

    Dr. Greger is again changing the paradigm deftly and bravely by showing conspiracies at the very top of the Food and Drug Adminsitration at how we eat and what we can say we eat. The Federal Government and the U.N. recommend 30 minutes of vigorous exercise a day, knowing that with that recommendation many less people will attempt to get any at all and knowing how few people currently ever get exercise. If they said instead jogging as little as five minutes a day, two or three laps around a track, could improve your heart health by half and add five or more years to your life, I am sure more people would do it. To say, jog 30 minutes a day is to say to be a near professional athlete and run 5 miles or so a day, which is unreasonable, not statistical, and unscientific. This would what a competitive runner would do, and is an unrealistic standard. There is a conspiracy against drinking green tea, the idea being that the FDA does not recommend tea for cancer prevention when everyone knows that green tea almost assuredly a fountain of youth with marvelous anti-cancer properties, some doctors are recommended 7-10 cups a day, as Dr. Greger is here. Drinking juice is currently much maligned, despite its great convenience and availability and cost effectiveness. Perhaps if there were less interest in straining juices, people could get nutrition year round, given that we can only get fruits in the summer or fall in this hemisphere. Some juices can store better. McDonald’s is running a campaign that they use 100 percent beef without comment from the FDA knowing that there is a PubMed article that shows that fast food beef is only 2-14 percent beef (with 12 being average). http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18995204 This is the established science of the land, that fast food is not using beef. Perhaps people are unaware of just how good walnuts are, and perhaps there is reason to doubt the federal government will cause awareness for nuts, knowing how much they add heart health. Thank you for your advocacy.

  • HemoDynamic, M.D.

    Because of this video (and all the incredible work you have done) I am donating $100 to NutritionFacts.org. (I wish I could donate more–soon though)
    Your work is invaluable to the education of our public and all humankind.

    I hope many others will find the amazing work of NutritionFacts.org just as valuable and donate what they can to help educate everyone in the field of Medicine, Nutrition and Health!

    With my utmost gratitude. Thank You!!!!!!!

    • Veganrunner

      Me too then!
      Xoxo

    • Veganrunner

      That was easy. It only took a minute. Thanks for reminding me Dr Hemo!

    • Thea

      HemoDynamic: You are very generous! We all do what we can. For myself, I’m on a (low) monthly plan. I agree with you that NutritionFacts is worth supporting. And as regular reader of NutritionFacts, I’m appreciative of your personal support/time/posts too! We all work to make this a really great resource. Thanks for this post. I hope it encourages others to join in too.

  • Wnc Doc

    What a great conversation~~

    As far as I am concerned, all anyone needs to do to start on your journey of true and attainable “HUMAN HEALTH” is to fully embed yourself in the documentary “Forks Over Knives”; THIS HAS NOW BECOME A PART OF EVERY PATIENT ENCOUNTER I NOW HAVE.

    It is avail on Amazon and Netflix~~Caldwell Esselstyn, MD and T. Colin Campbell, PhD have figured it out the path to optimal and honest to goodness human wellness — AT ANY AGE — through their respective of 40 years of research each.

    Remember, the human genome itself has not changed much since caveman times…what has changed from that time until now is what we eat and the amount of activity we get. The early people lived off the land and hunted and maybe had access to a “kill” weekly or monthly–who knows–but they got a lot of exercise and ate non processed food…people back in the times of the prophets did not walk the earth with lipitor in their pockets…they too ate nuts and berries and the flesh of animals if and when they could afford it~~which was not often unless you were royalty.

    “Forks Over Knives” is about returning to that level of simplicity in our food consumption~~raw, whole foods with minimal processing with no animal product and minimal oil–the good doctors have the science behind the destruction of the endothelial lining of our blood vessels and the development of cancer and vascular disease when these animal products, processed foods and oils are consumed. When your blood vessels are damaged, it is clear that all kinds of diseases ensue from the resulting inflammation; remove the impetus for the inflammation, and cure the disease.

    Dr. John Mac Dougall said it best in the film right around minute 1:28: “…let’s get rid of the problem which is the sickness which is caused by the food”… I could NOT have said it better myself…I implore everyone reading this to watch the film and pass it on to as many people as you know, and to join us to fight this UGLY corporate greed AND LIE one educated and healthy human at a time!

  • Ray Tajoma

    tobacco industry was tiny compared to livestock industry. Only half the US population at the most used tobacco, but 98% of people eat at fast food chains and supermarkets and watch TV Ads bombarded with manufactured food advertisements. Livestock industry is also hugely influential in congress and controls the media & the US government from the inside out.

  • dijkstrajwe

    As a physician, I am fully aware of the biased science we have to deal with in medical journal articles. Editors have a hard time finding reviewers who do not have some form of conflict of interest through financial connections with the pharmaceutical or other industries. I only wish that Dr. Greger had been as forceful when he did his series on GMO foods. I am sure he can find plenty of White Coat Projects among the science coming out of that industry. I am still bothered by his unscientific statement, on which I commented in the GMO series, when he proclaimed: “So I’m sympathetic to the biotech industry’s exasperation about GMO concerns when we still have people dropping dead from everything else they’re eating.”

  • Paul Spring

    This where health and politics meet. If you are of the belief that one should champion corporate-sponsored research over government-sponsored, then this is what results – Bias. Good nutrition should not be a left-wing or right-wing issue – but the reality of it is, that it is.

  • Agnotology- Agnosis is the neoclassical Greek word for ignorance or ‘not knowing’, and ontology, the branch of metaphysics which deals with the nature of being. Agnotology is the study of willful acts to spread confusion and deceit, usually to sell a product or win favour.

  • Tom Goff

    Dr G is in very good company here. As the Director General of the World Health Organization stated in 2013:

    “Efforts to prevent noncommunicable diseases go against the business interests of powerful economic operators. In my view, this is one of the biggest challenges facing health promotion.

    As the new publication makes clear, it is not just Big Tobacco anymore. Public health must also contend with Big Food, Big Soda, and Big Alcohol. All of these industries fear regulation, and protect themselves by using the same tactics.

    Research has documented these tactics well. They include front groups, lobbies, promises of self-regulation, lawsuits, and industry-funded research that confuses the evidence and keeps the public in doubt.

    Tactics also include gifts, grants, and contributions to worthy causes that cast these industries as respectable corporate citizens in the eyes of politicians and the public. They include arguments that place the responsibility for harm to health on individuals, and portray government actions as interference in personal liberties and free choice.

    This is formidable opposition. Market power readily translates into political power. Few governments prioritize health over big business. As we learned from experience with the tobacco industry, a powerful corporation can sell the public just about anything.”
    http://www.who.int/dg/speeches/2013/health_promotion_20130610/en/