Anti-Angiogenesis: Cutting Off Tumor Supply Lines

Anti-Angiogenesis: Cutting Off Tumor Supply Lines
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Cancer cells are commonly present in the body, but cannot grow into tumors without hooking up a blood supply. Angiogenesis inhibitors in plant foods may help prevent this from happening.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Probably about a third of common cancers “can be prevented by eating a healthy, plant-based diet; being physically active; and maintaining a healthy weight.” One of the ways plants may help is by cutting off the supply lines to cancerous tumors.

A tumor cannot grow without a blood supply. Currently, it’s believed that a tumor mass cannot exist in a volume greater than about size of the ball at the tip of a ballpoint pen without a proper blood supply, which indicates that angiogenesis—angio means vessel, so the genesis, the creation, of new blood vessels is critical to tumor growth. Each one of us has cancer cells in us right now. By age 70, microscopic cancers are detected in the thyroid glands of virtually everyone, for example.

“Most of these tumors” never cause problems, “never become clinically significant, leading to the concept of ‘cancer without disease’ as a normal state during aging.” Cancer cells are commonly present in the body, but they can’t grow into tumors any bigger than that tiny dot size—no more than ten million cancer cells—before needing to get hooked up to a blood supply. So, tumors diabolically release angiogenic factors, chemicals that cause new blood vessels to sprout into the tumor. The most important one is called VEGF, vascular endothelial growth factor. But we can suppress VEGF with veggies.

Many of the phytonutrients we know and love in tea, and spices, and fruit, and berries, and broccoli, and beans, can block cancer’s stimulation of new blood vessels. They’re “ideal for prophylactic long-term use against breast cancer because of their reliability, availability, safety, and affordable price. Dietary agents used to suppress angiogenesis [may] be an important step in the prevention and treatment of breast cancer[s],” and in fact all types of tumors. The review concludes that we now have “convincing evidence that dietary [plant constituents] possess the unique ability to affect tumor angiogenesis, which may be deemed advantageous in the prevention and treatment of human breast cancer.”

Most of these studies have only been done in a petri dish, though. You stimulate human blood vessel cells, and they start forming these tubular structures trying to make new capillaries to feed the tumor. But, if you add plant flavones like apigen or luteolin, found throughout the plant kingdom—like in citrus, celery, and peppers—you can see they help block the tube formation. Here’s the effect of fisetin, a phytonutrient found in strawberries, and other fruits and veggies. It just shrinks the beginnings of new blood vessel formation right on down.

Where do researchers get their hands on human blood vessels from?  Human umbilical vein endothelial cells. They get them from discarded umbilical cords, or, more controversially, from the eyes of aborted fetuses.

But, either way, you can stimulate blood vessel formation with the tumor compound VEGF, and then abolish that effect with plant compounds—in this case, from purple rice. “Therefore, the daily consumption of natural foods containing adequate flavonoids could be beneficial for the prevention of cancer metastasis or could improve cancer prognosis.”

Given the power of plants, one might speculate that the foundation of an anti-angiogenic approach to cancer might be a whole-food vegan diet.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to Jeff Kubina via flickr; Sun417, Evan-Amos, Amagill, and Igno2 via Wikimedia; and niusheng11.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Probably about a third of common cancers “can be prevented by eating a healthy, plant-based diet; being physically active; and maintaining a healthy weight.” One of the ways plants may help is by cutting off the supply lines to cancerous tumors.

A tumor cannot grow without a blood supply. Currently, it’s believed that a tumor mass cannot exist in a volume greater than about size of the ball at the tip of a ballpoint pen without a proper blood supply, which indicates that angiogenesis—angio means vessel, so the genesis, the creation, of new blood vessels is critical to tumor growth. Each one of us has cancer cells in us right now. By age 70, microscopic cancers are detected in the thyroid glands of virtually everyone, for example.

“Most of these tumors” never cause problems, “never become clinically significant, leading to the concept of ‘cancer without disease’ as a normal state during aging.” Cancer cells are commonly present in the body, but they can’t grow into tumors any bigger than that tiny dot size—no more than ten million cancer cells—before needing to get hooked up to a blood supply. So, tumors diabolically release angiogenic factors, chemicals that cause new blood vessels to sprout into the tumor. The most important one is called VEGF, vascular endothelial growth factor. But we can suppress VEGF with veggies.

Many of the phytonutrients we know and love in tea, and spices, and fruit, and berries, and broccoli, and beans, can block cancer’s stimulation of new blood vessels. They’re “ideal for prophylactic long-term use against breast cancer because of their reliability, availability, safety, and affordable price. Dietary agents used to suppress angiogenesis [may] be an important step in the prevention and treatment of breast cancer[s],” and in fact all types of tumors. The review concludes that we now have “convincing evidence that dietary [plant constituents] possess the unique ability to affect tumor angiogenesis, which may be deemed advantageous in the prevention and treatment of human breast cancer.”

Most of these studies have only been done in a petri dish, though. You stimulate human blood vessel cells, and they start forming these tubular structures trying to make new capillaries to feed the tumor. But, if you add plant flavones like apigen or luteolin, found throughout the plant kingdom—like in citrus, celery, and peppers—you can see they help block the tube formation. Here’s the effect of fisetin, a phytonutrient found in strawberries, and other fruits and veggies. It just shrinks the beginnings of new blood vessel formation right on down.

Where do researchers get their hands on human blood vessels from?  Human umbilical vein endothelial cells. They get them from discarded umbilical cords, or, more controversially, from the eyes of aborted fetuses.

But, either way, you can stimulate blood vessel formation with the tumor compound VEGF, and then abolish that effect with plant compounds—in this case, from purple rice. “Therefore, the daily consumption of natural foods containing adequate flavonoids could be beneficial for the prevention of cancer metastasis or could improve cancer prognosis.”

Given the power of plants, one might speculate that the foundation of an anti-angiogenic approach to cancer might be a whole-food vegan diet.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to Jeff Kubina via flickr; Sun417, Evan-Amos, Amagill, and Igno2 via Wikimedia; and niusheng11.

Doctor's Note

The cancer-promoting growth hormone IGF-1 is another angiogenic factor, helping tumors turn on the gravy train. This may be another reason plant-based diets protect against cancer, since as few as two weeks on a healthy diet can lower IGF-1 levels. See my series on the elegant experiments that discovered this:

One way cancer turns on the tap is by silencing certain tumor-suppressor genes. How do you turn them back on? See, for example, Apple Skin: Peeling Back Cancer.

How else can strawberries smack on the cancer kibosh? See Strawberries vs. Esophageal Cancer and Cancer-Fighting Berries.

Because we all likely have cancer cells inside us, Cancer Prevention & Treatment May Be the Same Thing. To die with cancer rather than from cancer, we need to slow down cancer-doubling time. Check out my oldie-but-goodie video, Slowing the Growth of Cancer.

For further context, check out my associated blog post: Flax and Breast Cancer Survival and Starving Tumors of Their Blood Supply.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

71 responses to “Anti-Angiogenesis: Cutting Off Tumor Supply Lines

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    1. There are a lot of “junk-food” vegans. Also, there’s only one very large prospective cohort study looking at vegans specifically, Adventist Health Study 2, whereas EPIC-Oxford had a mostly ovo-lacto-vegetarian cohort – in both cases, the reference omnivore cohort was markedly healthier than the general population.

      I suspect veganism, per-se, is just one part an anti-cancer diet (reducing exposure of carcinogenic compounds and tumor growth promoters concentrated in animal products). An anti-cancer diet also needs to be low or moderate in complete protein and high-insulemic index foods (to reduce growth promoting IGF-1), and perhaps low in methionine specifically while high in fiber, phytochemical hormetics (to induce endogenous antioxidant responses and toxin removal), epigenetically active compunds (to reexpress tumor suppressor genes for induce cellular senescence or apoptosis), inflammation inhibitors, and antiangiogenetic compounds. Ie, Green tea, cruciferous vegetables, onions, berries, citrus, whole beans rounding out the calories, but not really the fake meats & cheeses or sweet desserts that ethics oriented vegans may be eating.




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      1. Thank you! I will view Dr. Li’s talk. I know I am not, nor is anyone cancer proof, but my erudite opinion is that vegans have more of a chance, generally, to improve their odds against ever getting cancer, and I thought from previous studies, that the odds are well over 2/3ds against getting cancer




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      2. Thanks for your useful insights. In his talk, Dr. Li also raised an interesting point on how weight loss is associated with anti-angiogenic compounds. I wonder if this might explain the lower BMI of vegetarians and vegans relative to the general population.
        Do you have any thoughts on how fruits and vegetables should be combined in the diet to maximize synergistic effects for the prevention of cancer?




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        1. Cao, Yihai. “Angiogenesis modulates adipogenesis and obesity.” Journal of Clinical Investigation 117.9 (2007): 2362-2368. is just the first of 40,000+ Google Scholar results for “angiogenesis obesity”. Adipocytes (fat cells) need a blood supply, too.

          I can’t claim any expertise in food combinations that potentiate anti-cancer effects The Nrf2 activating hormetins may prevent initiating mutations, while epigenetic modulatiors encourage transformed cell suicide or senescence and angiogenesis inhibitors starve larger tumors. For chemoprevention, these classes are probably all helpful, but their benefit will occur at different stages of disease progression.

          The plasma lifetimes of some important “nutraceuticals” like sulforaphane (cruciferous vegetables) or epigallocatechin gallate (green tea) are around 4-8 hours, but once they’ve activated transcription factors, levels of cytoprotective genes can remain elevated for days. So while continuous high plasma levels would require chemoprotective foods at every meal, that might not be necessary.

          I’ve seen studies that point to synergies from targeting a given signalling pathway like Keap-Nrf2-ARE with multiple compounds. Variety is probably important.

          Many of these beneficial plant compounds seem to serve the plants as pesticides (hence their concentration in the leaves and skins of fruit). Our ancestors evolved to deal with these exobiotic toxins with robust endogenous antioxidant and detoxification responses, and in their absence (eg, in a highly processed diet), our cells don’t get the expected cues to ramp up defenses. But, after a point, more is not necessarily better (see these videos on broccoli juice and green tea extract overdose). A variety of chemopreventative whole foods (rather than supplements) may keep dosing in the hormetic range.

          If you’re interested in multi-tiered approaches to cancer prevention I recommend looking around Vincent Giuliano’s Anti-Aging Firewalls site. Like many life-extension self-experimenters he’s a bit supplement happy for my taste, but he’s pointed me to a lot of active research avenues and has put together some useful summaries.




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        2. I can’t claim expertise in chemopreventative phytonutrient combinations, and I suspect few experts exist. While there are studies pointing to synergistic effects of targeting say, phase II enzyme induction with multiple phytochemicals, that’s just one chemopreventative mechanism. Most of the work exists as in vitro studies on cancer cell cultures, with a few comparing different phytochemicals’ effectiveness (eg. high throughput studies for drug candidate discovery), and to my knowledge none comparing different phytochemical combination regimens for in vitro cancer progression, much less on in vivo outcomes.

          The various anti-cancer mechanisms assume varying importance in different stages of cancer progression. The Nrf-2 inducing hormetins are perhaps most important in preventing initial mutations, while they may have a negative impact on advanced cancer (by protecting cancer cells). Angiogenesis inhibitors, on the other hand, won’t have much effect on microscopic cancer cells. Given we don’t know what stage our occult cancers are at, it seems reasonable to adopt a multi-tiered approach. Vince Giuliano, who has studied this for a decade, likens his approach to the redundant firewalls in computer security, and I’ve learned a lot from him.

          Kinetic studies of EGCG from tea and sulforaphane from broccoli show plasma peaks 4-8 hours after ingestion, but cytoprotective enzymes remain elevated for days. Its probably unwise to try megadoses of a lot of these compounds, as their benefits sometimes arise from the cell’s detoxification response to clear them out. Variety, and regular, small (food rather than supplement size) doses are sensible. An ideal anti-cancer diet might be triathlete and cancer survivor Ruth Heidrich’s diet, but even I’m not sure I’m ready for salad every meal.




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      3. “Dude, that’s TNT” Now if we can just convince a few billion others, both as individuals and as a planet, of the benefits of a whole foods, plant base diet that… can you imagine. Cancer, heart disease and even global freaking warming would all be virtually “toothless tigers”




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    2. This is not a guarantee. A dear friend of mine who was a Vegan vegetarian died of lung cancer this past February. Her circle of friends were shocked at her diagnosis and then her death. I think that eating a variety of fruits & veggies helps supply you with agents that help to eradicate the cancer cells’ blood supply which is crucial to their survival. However, many people do not understand the concept that cancer is a MULTIFACTORIAL disease. In other words,
      there are many other factors that can contribute to cancer causation such as genetics, lifestyle factors, environmental contamination, stress, vitamin deficiencies (particularly Vitamin D3 which also has an impact on cardiovascular disease) and so forth. Be well!!!




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  1. This is great stuff as is usual from you Dr. Greger!

    It does “beg the question”, What foods PROMOTE angioenesis??? Those would be ones to avoid most likely though not always. Beets for example promote nitric formation which in turn may promote angiogenesis. And really any foods high in arginine may well do the same and that would include nuts/seeds/rice… Would really love some more/deeper clarification on this one!




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    1. Go up to the sourses above and look into Dr. Li’s work. He has a website that lists the foods. Most are the “best of” foods that appear in Dr Greger’s videos.




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    2. Hi Geoffrey Levens, I know this is old but I just came across something new that is a related factor but not previously mentioned. In addition to Methionine promoting VEGF with Methionine coming primarily from meat, meat is also the primary dietary source of advanced glycation end products which have also been shown to facilitate VEGF.

      And here I though diabetics who tend to produce endogenous AGEs in excess were only at risk of neuropathy, nephropathy, atherosclerosis, diabetic retinopathy. I think I better go check my blood sugar.




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  2. There is much talk that sugars, including fruit sugars, feed cancers. Where does that fit into a cancer-killing vegan diet?




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    1. Thinkabouddit: I’m not familiar with studies showing that whole fruits, with their sugars, feed cancers. I am familiar with studies on this site showing that whole fruits fight cancers – especially berries. And I *think* there is even a video showing dates fighting colon or rectal cancer. (But I may be making that up.)

      I can imagine that table sugar would be a problem, but I have a hard time imagining that a whole fruit, especially organic, would be a promote cancer. Maybe if you took the sugars out of the fruit – but that is not how we enlightened people eat fruit.

      I wonder if Dr. Greger’s recent blog post could shed some light on things. Here’s my thought: What if those studies trying to say that sugar in fruits feed cancer are really confusing other aspects of the fruit – such as pesticides? Here’s what I’m getting at from Dr. Greger’s blog post:

      “A new study calculated that if half the U.S. population ate just one more serving of conventional fruits and vegetables, 20,000 cases of cancer could be prevented. At the same time the added pesticide consumption could cause up to 10 extra cancer cases. So by eating conventional produce we may
      get a tiny bump in cancer risk, but that’s more than compensated by the dramatic drop in risk that accompanies whole food plant consumption.”

      From:http://nutritionfacts.org/2013/06/25/apple-peels-turn-on-anticancer-genes/

      Just a thought. I’m just guessing that the studies which say that fruit feeds cancer are probably either a) getting mixed up in what they are measuring or b) are focusing on those 10 extra cancer cases listed above and missing the bigger picture of the 20,000 avoided. Again, just a guess.




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    2. Sugars feed all cells, including cancer cells. So if you eradicated all sugars from your diet, yes you could “starve” cancer cells along with every other cell in your body. However it is true that due to the rate at which cancer cells divide compared to most other cells, they are more sensitive in general to interventions that target growth. This is how traditional chemotherapy works and why other rapidly dividing sites such as hair follicles (hair loss), stomach lining (nausea), and bone marrow (immune system impairment) are inadvertently targeted along with the tumor. Traditional chemotherapy kills cancer cells, sure, but it also kills every other cell in the body, albeit at a slower rate. Administering it is a balance between trying to kill the tumor before you kill the rest of the patient.

      So I guess my point is that context and balance are key. Things that kill cancer cells can kill normal cells, though indeed many plants are capable of targeted cancer cell killing, and this is an exciting area of research. And on the other hand things that cause cancer cell growth can be necessary for the growth of normal cells as well, though there are many things that cancer cells require (like angiogenesis factors for one) that normal cells don’t. However sugar is not one of those things. It is needed by both cancerous and normal cells.




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      1. Eradicating sugar from your diet wouldn’t starve the cancer as your body always has glucose in the blood as it’s our cells energy source. If we don’t eat sugar then our body converts fats into sugar via lipolysis…. and puts it into blood stream for cellular energy




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  3. Wow, recently diagnosed with Stage 4 lung cancer, I found this video not only “eye opening” and “earth shattering”. As I’ve told so many folks over the years. “you don’t have to believe; but you’ve definitely got to think about it”. In any case, “THANK YOu” so very, very much and “vegan” here I come. Don and I CAN! :-))n




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    1. Southlander: Sorry to hear about your diagnosis.

      Good for you for your positive attitude. While diet is not a magic pill and there are no guarantees, there are many, many stories of cancer patients who are able to reverse their cancers on a whole, plant food based diet. But probably not just any diet. Darryl listed some great ideas to start to figure out which foods to focus on. See Darryl’s post above. It’s great.

      Also, you may want to check out a very inspiring story that Dr. Greger posted on his Facebook page about a 90 year old man who appear to have beaten prostate cancer:
      https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=679724962044016&set=a.505323302817517.132300.215513991798451&type=1

      You may also want to check out the many more videos on this site that deal with cancer. You will learn that there are many ways in which a whole plant food (supplemented with B12!) diet fights cancer. I think a good way to start is with the blog posts that have a subject matter of cancer. Then you can watch the videos that Dr. Greger links to in his blog posts.

      If you are not familiar with plant-based eating, there are some great recipe books out there. The food is fantastic. Most people find themselves surprised at how their food horizons expand, when they expected nothing but contraction. You just have to find the recipes that you like.

      Good luck to you!




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  4. Can”t understand why people would rather hack burn or bomb symptoms with poisons than feed the body good phytonutrients to cure it. Should be taught in schools at an early age ideally ? Probiotics too ?




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  5. Dr Li of the Angiogenesis Foundation gave a TED talk on this in 2010. Part of the talk discussed results of experiments which showed the inhibiting effects of diet (plant substances) on cancer cell growth. One reason I drink green tea and eat berries…

    http://www.angio.org/understanding/diet.php
    From what I am coming to understand, much of the positive and negative effects of substances in foods is due to impact on cell signaling, not the quenching or generation of free radicals. This would include influencing gene expression.




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    1. I’ve come to similar conclusions. A few papers that clarified my thoughts on exogenous antioxidants:

      Significance of dietary antioxidants for health

      Exogenous antioxidants—double-edged swords in cellular redox state: health beneficial effects at physiologic doses versus deleterious effects at high doses.

      Plant-derived compounds as antioxidants for health—are they all really antioxidants

      Research strategies in the study of the pro-oxidant nature of polyphenol nutraceuticals

      Antioxidants prevent health-promoting effects of physical exercise in humans

      A systems biology perspective on Nrf2-mediated antioxidant response

      The ORAC and similar in vitro antioxidant assays seem to provide a rough measure of biologically active polyphenol content, but the benefits of polyphenols may be through pro-oxidant interactions with cell regulatory molecules, rather than mopping up reactive nitrogen and oxygen species themselves.




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  6. Take note of the statement at the very end of the video (which no one seems to have picked up on), that low fat plays an anti-cancer role.




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  7. Just wanted to share a patient that came to the office yesterday.

    Young female started a Vegan diet after visiting our office about 2 months ago. A couple weeks later was having such severe pain while breathing in she went to the ER for evaluation.

    CT scan showed 3 cm tumor growing in right lung.

    Cardiothoracic surgeon and second opinion both agreed needed at least a biopsy because it looked like Cancer. Because of the severe pain, regardless of whether or not it was benign or malignant, patient opted to have it removed rather than biopsied and then removed.

    5 days ago the patient went in for surgery, was prepped and sent for repeat CT to zero in on where tumor was. The radiologist and first surgeon couldn’t find the tumor anymore. They called the original Cardiothoracic surgeon to take a look and he could barely see where it was. They were dumbfounded!! The tumor was so small they didn’t need to operate. They sent her home!

    Patient called me and asked my opinion about what happened to the tumor. I stated there is no way to actually prove (that I know of) that changing her diet was the actual cause of the shrinkage of the tumor but as the days Video shows the evidence is quite compelling that changing her diet was probably what caused the tumors demise.

    Patient has no more pain and is able to exercise and live life normally thanks to what looks like a simple change in lifestyle. No other conventional treatment has ever been so successful!

    In fact the patient shared that all the nurses were asking her what she did because they have never seen something like this before. And she told them the only thing she did was change her diet–she couldn’t even exercise because the pain was so severe. She said they were all amazed.

    Interestingly she said the doctors didn’t seen to be so impressed with her tumor disappearance which I personally find disappointing.

    We are going to write this case study up with the CT images and hopefully get it published.

    Anyway, thanks for reading and thanks to Dr. Greger for disseminating the peer reviewed research on the benefits of lifestyle changes. You really are a lifesaver!




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      1. Yes, I’m glad you enjoyed it. I thought it was great! I’ve had a couple of other like this as well but not a dramatic nor in such a short time.




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    1. Wow. She came to you 2 months ago and you were able to convince her to become a vegan? You’re good. What did you say to convince her?




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      1. One key is I always try to meet the patient where they are. If they aren’t ready to change I won’t even go there. But she was already willing and so the change was easy, she just needed the support and that is what we are experts at where I work.

        During an office visit the patients get 90 minutes with a health coach and me. The health coach brings them in for the first 30 minutes, then all of us together for the next 30 min. where I teach the pertinent points in the benefits of lifestyle change (much of what you see on this website. Here’s a lecture that I did a while ago http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zh6XL3JoIto –not as good as Dr. Greger’s but you will get the idea of what I teach by watching.), then the last 30 is reinforcement time to review what we went over and to provide a food plan. And then phone or email follow-up about every week. Makes it much easier to keep the patients on track.




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    2. I have this patient I am just trying to get to decrease from 10 servings of fish per week! “But they live longer in Japan.” He is cutting back on all animal but it is like pulling teeth!




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      1. I always tell my patients about how fish are the biotoxic accumulators of our environment because every single drug that People take and every single environmental toxin ends up in our oceans and hence, our fish. And then there is PHiP in all cooked meats that is very pro-inflammatory and all animal protein regardless of source turns on the genes that promote cancer, etc.

        But as the Buddhist proverb states, “When the student is ready, the teacher will appear.”

        And Confucius, “It does not matter how slowly you go as long as you do not stop.”

        Remember life is wonderful in that we have free-will so as long as you provide the information you should feel great and not worry about the other person changing. You have planted a seed and some take longer to sprout than others.




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    3. What a fantastic anecdote! Reading this story made be feel good all over. What an amazing outcome for this patient. The power of healthy plant-based eating does not cease to amaze me. Keep sharing the positive anecdotes please!




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  8. Just got to this but wow……. you keep your heart and pelvic arteries open with plants and you keep your tumor arteries closed with plants. How wonderful the body is




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    1. Karen: I appear to be addicted to vegan cookbooks. I have over 70 of them now. (Seriously addicted.) While I am by no means an expert and have had time to try only a small number of the recipes in all those books, here’s my favorite all-around cooking books so far:

      > Vegan on the Cheap
      > Happy Everyday Herbivore
      > Let Them Eat Vegan

      It’s hard to restrict to just three, but those would be my top three as of this moment. They are mostly whole-plant food based, but very do-able and most of the recipes I tried from these books come out to my liking. And best of all, I believe that the majority of the recipes in these books would fit with Dr. Greger’s nutrition recommendations. (Not that I am speaking for Dr. Greger.)

      I think this is a great question and hope that other people will chime in with their favorite books as well.




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  9. So what do you have to say about someone who is a total vegan and excersises daily in otherwise excellent health and ends up with breast cancer?




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    1. p sully: I’m sorry to hear that you or someone you know has cancer.

      Here is how I explain this situation to people that I work with:

      People who smoke can live long lives without any lung cancer. And yet, people who smoke have dramatically more risk of developing lung cancer. Conversely, those who do not smoke have dramatically less *chances* of getting lung cancer. But even people who don’t smoke can and do get lung cancer.

      Diet is just like that. It is not a magic guarantee of anything. But ohhhh boy can a NutritionFacts diet *dramatically* decrease the risk of developing a range of major diseases, including cancer. Not a guaranteed, but wonderful insurance.

      That’s a perspective for you. I think I would also add that diet is just one factor in affecting diseases. It is a biggie. But not the only factor.

      I hope this reply helps and that whoever we are talking about experiences remission.




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  10. You say that diet etc. can prevent one third of cancers. I have been reading and hearing numbers much higher than that. I am more comfortable with what you say here. Would you tell where the number of one third comes from.




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  11. The review you cited about rosemary being anti-angiogenic looks fascinating (Anti-angiogenic properties of carnosol and carnosic acid, two major dietary compounds from rosemary.) Any indication of how much should be consumed to receive the benefit?




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  12. What about benign tumors? Is anti-angiogenesis equally important for non cancerous tumors to grow? Can benign tumors perform apoptosis? A beloved family member is facing surgery for removal of a tumor (likely benign) pressing into the spinal column. This involves sawing off the back half of a vertebra to access it. Any ideas are welcome.




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  13. Oooookay, the end remark promoted a vegan diet. I find that one claim might make your entire video biased. For everyone’s information, hunter-gatherer populations are the healthiest in the world, with incidences of cancer being rare. THOUSANDS of epidemiological studies on hunter-gatherers, their diet, correlation between vegetable intake and cancer, compounds in Brassica vegetables all point in one direction: vegetables (especially brassica vegetables like Broccoli) and fruit help prevent cancer. Because cancer is rare in hunter-gatherer populations who eat a traditional human diet of MEAT (wild meat that is), fruits, vegetables and nuts, you do not need to go vegan to prevent cancer. However, many studies have shown how unhealthy and cancer-promoting western, grain-fed, factory raised meat can be. The nutritional composition of our meat versus wild game, or traditionally raised meats, has dramatic differences, with the wild meats actually being good for you and the western raised meats not so good. No one needs to go vegan in order to prevent cancer. Just stop eating processed foods, cook your own food, try to eat grass-fed beef or pastured chickens, seafood, and eat fruits and vegetables 3 times a day each. Eat your broccoli raw for maximum absorbtion of glucosinolates (precursers to anti-cancer comounds).




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  14. Hello, I’m Martin from Argentina. When i look all these videos I can’t stop surprising milself. Its amazing the stuf your explaining with that all evidence. Congratulations. And thank you for sharing it.
    I have one questios if you let me. What happens with a person diagnosticated with cancer start with the plant based diet, should he stopped the tradicional medicine that Dorctos supplied him? Would that medicine interfere whith the benefits of the plant based diet?
    Ill be gratefull wiht your answer, and sorry for my English.
    Thank you
    Martin




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    1. Martin: I’m not a doctor. I just wanted to make sure someone responds to you.

      I’m so glad you are getting benefit from these videos. I’m a big believer in the importance and practical application of this information.

      As for your question about treating cancer, I’ll give you my lay-person’s 2 cents: I don’t think anyone can answer that question for you. You would need to sit down with someone who understands your particular situation (what type of cancer, how fast it’s growing, your risk factors, etc) AND who understands nutrition AND who understands the pros and cons of traditional medicine options for your situation. That person would ideally be able to help you answer your question and/or refer you to sources that will help you make that decision. And ideally, that person would be your doctor.

      In America, it is very hard to find a doctor who could do this, but it is possible, especially if someone is willing to do a lot of their own research. I don’t know how things are in Argentina. I’m thinking good thoughts for you (or whoever you are asking about) that you can find someone who understands both traditional medicine and the powerful cancer fighting effects of proper nutrition. There are lots of videos on this site related to cancer too. I those can also help. *Good luck.*




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  15. My husband first found out he was diabetic, then that he had prostate cancer. We found the video ‘forks over knives’ at our local library – Ontario, Canada; and he was off to the races. He had been a huge meat eater and lover of all animal carcasses, once diagnosed completely changed to a vegan diet – no oils, no fish, no chicken, no red meat, no dairy which included eggs, no fat in products over 2 grams and became completely diabetic and cancer free within months – that was 3 years ago and still free….it works!




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  16. Has there ever been a link between nutrition and non-cancerous lipoma? I have been eating a vegan diet for 2 years now and still manage to get lipomas once in a while.




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  17. I just read an article in Roll Call regarding The Cancer Caucus. It is unbelievable to me that there was not one mention of nutrition. Please tell me that someone knows something about this and members of this caucus are considering nutrition in the fight.




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  18. Dr. Greger, in 2014 i was diagnosed with esophageal cancer, went through Chemo, Radiation and surgery. A month ago test results showed two lymph nodes located near my esophagus were cancerous. They want to do the Chemo and Radiation again. My preference is to treat the disease as an inflammatory condition using a diet program to bring it under control. I’ve began a make sense diet 3 weeks ago, using PET or CT scan how long should I wait to see some positive results? Coovert




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  19. I’m getting an error trying to watch this video, on both Safari and Chrome. I am able to watch YouTube videos, but not this. Anyone else?




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