The Best Food for High Cholesterol

The Best Food for High Cholesterol
4.68 (93.67%) 98 votes

Are the apparently amazing benefits of amla—dried indian gooseberries—too good to be true?

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

“Medicinal plants are [said to be] nature’s gift to human beings to promote a disease free healthy life”—here in reference to amla, a fruit, the Indian gooseberry, described as an “Ayurvedic wonder.” You hear a lot of that larger-than-life talk about amla coming out of Indian medical journals. Who can forget “Amla…, a wonder berry in the treatment and prevention of cancer.” Amla is so revered that you find serious scientists, at serious academic institutions, in serious peer-reviewed medical journals, making statements like this: “[E]very part of the [Indian gooseberry] plant has its unique therapeutic characteristic for the remedy of almost all the ailments…[and] can be adopted as a [bold italic] single bullet [against disease].” Okay, then.

I first ran across it in this famous article, looking at the total antioxidant content of thousands of different foods. 

I did a series of videos about it ages ago. And, to my surprise, the #1 most antioxidant-packed single whole food on the planet, on average, was amla: dried powdered Indian gooseberries, beating out the prior heavyweight champion, cloves, with, just for comparison’s sake, up to a hundred times or more antioxidants by weight than blueberries.

So, here’s this fruit that has enjoyed “a hallowed position in Ayurveda,” the ancient system of medicine in India—so hallowed that it was mythologically pegged as “the first tree…in the universe.” So, for thousands of years—before we even knew what an antioxidant was—they were revering this plant that just so happens to turn out to be the most antioxidant-packed fruit on the planet Earth. Okay, you got my attention. But, I still needed to see it put to the test.

Well, indigenous tribal healers used amla to treat diabetes. So, researchers decided to give it a try. This is the study that originally bowled me over. In fact, it was the subject of one of my first NutritionFacts videos over five years ago: the effect of amla fruit on the blood sugars and cholesterol levels of normal subjects and type 2 diabetic patients. In my video, I talked about the jaw-dropping effects of five cents’ worth of this powdered fruit— five pennies’ worth—compared to a diabetes drug. But, what about the cholesterol effects?

If you take healthy individuals and give them a placebo sugar pill, nothing much happens to their cholesterol. Ideally, we want our total cholesterol under 150. This was a pretty healthy group; the average cholesterol in the U.S. is over 200, which is where the diabetics started out in this study. And, when you give them placebo pills, nothing much happens either. But, give people just about a half-teaspoon of amla powder a day—not some extract or something, just dried Indian gooseberries, a powdered fruit, and this is what happens. That’s like a 35-45% drop in three weeks—absolutely astounding. That’s the kind of thing we see like six months after putting people on statin drugs.

What we care most about is LDL, though—so-called bad cholesterol, shooting for under at least 70, ideally. No impact of the placebos, but again, just about a half-teaspoon of amla, which would cost you about five cents a day, so like a buck fifty a month—and boom.

These results knocked my socks off. I mean, they’re just unbelievable. That’s why I was so excited, after all these years, to dig back into the amla literature to see if these findings had been confirmed, replicated elsewhere. So, I typed amla into PubMed, and waded through all the papers on using amla to decrease methane in cow farts, and speed the growth of chickens, or hey, what about amla ice cream? After all, amla is packed with fiber and phytonutrients. In contrast, ice cream is not. Therefore—and indeed, amla incorporated into ice cream increases the antioxidant capacity, though I would not recommend it for cholesterol lowering.

Ah, but here we go. A comparative clinical study of amla head to head against the cholesterol-lowering statin drug simvastatin, sold as Zocor—which I’ll cover, next.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Icons created by Sketch2SVG, Suji, and Alina Oleynik from The Noun Project.

Image credit: McKay Savage. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

“Medicinal plants are [said to be] nature’s gift to human beings to promote a disease free healthy life”—here in reference to amla, a fruit, the Indian gooseberry, described as an “Ayurvedic wonder.” You hear a lot of that larger-than-life talk about amla coming out of Indian medical journals. Who can forget “Amla…, a wonder berry in the treatment and prevention of cancer.” Amla is so revered that you find serious scientists, at serious academic institutions, in serious peer-reviewed medical journals, making statements like this: “[E]very part of the [Indian gooseberry] plant has its unique therapeutic characteristic for the remedy of almost all the ailments…[and] can be adopted as a [bold italic] single bullet [against disease].” Okay, then.

I first ran across it in this famous article, looking at the total antioxidant content of thousands of different foods. 

I did a series of videos about it ages ago. And, to my surprise, the #1 most antioxidant-packed single whole food on the planet, on average, was amla: dried powdered Indian gooseberries, beating out the prior heavyweight champion, cloves, with, just for comparison’s sake, up to a hundred times or more antioxidants by weight than blueberries.

So, here’s this fruit that has enjoyed “a hallowed position in Ayurveda,” the ancient system of medicine in India—so hallowed that it was mythologically pegged as “the first tree…in the universe.” So, for thousands of years—before we even knew what an antioxidant was—they were revering this plant that just so happens to turn out to be the most antioxidant-packed fruit on the planet Earth. Okay, you got my attention. But, I still needed to see it put to the test.

Well, indigenous tribal healers used amla to treat diabetes. So, researchers decided to give it a try. This is the study that originally bowled me over. In fact, it was the subject of one of my first NutritionFacts videos over five years ago: the effect of amla fruit on the blood sugars and cholesterol levels of normal subjects and type 2 diabetic patients. In my video, I talked about the jaw-dropping effects of five cents’ worth of this powdered fruit— five pennies’ worth—compared to a diabetes drug. But, what about the cholesterol effects?

If you take healthy individuals and give them a placebo sugar pill, nothing much happens to their cholesterol. Ideally, we want our total cholesterol under 150. This was a pretty healthy group; the average cholesterol in the U.S. is over 200, which is where the diabetics started out in this study. And, when you give them placebo pills, nothing much happens either. But, give people just about a half-teaspoon of amla powder a day—not some extract or something, just dried Indian gooseberries, a powdered fruit, and this is what happens. That’s like a 35-45% drop in three weeks—absolutely astounding. That’s the kind of thing we see like six months after putting people on statin drugs.

What we care most about is LDL, though—so-called bad cholesterol, shooting for under at least 70, ideally. No impact of the placebos, but again, just about a half-teaspoon of amla, which would cost you about five cents a day, so like a buck fifty a month—and boom.

These results knocked my socks off. I mean, they’re just unbelievable. That’s why I was so excited, after all these years, to dig back into the amla literature to see if these findings had been confirmed, replicated elsewhere. So, I typed amla into PubMed, and waded through all the papers on using amla to decrease methane in cow farts, and speed the growth of chickens, or hey, what about amla ice cream? After all, amla is packed with fiber and phytonutrients. In contrast, ice cream is not. Therefore—and indeed, amla incorporated into ice cream increases the antioxidant capacity, though I would not recommend it for cholesterol lowering.

Ah, but here we go. A comparative clinical study of amla head to head against the cholesterol-lowering statin drug simvastatin, sold as Zocor—which I’ll cover, next.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Icons created by Sketch2SVG, Suji, and Alina Oleynik from The Noun Project.

Image credit: McKay Savage. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video.

Doctor's Note

So excited to get back to this after all these years. Here’s the original series, which gives tips on how to find the stuff:

What else is super-duper antioxidant-packed? See my videos Antioxidant Power of Plant Foods vs. Animal Foods and Antioxidant Content of 3,139 Foods.

Stay tuned for the thrilling conclusion in my next video Amla vs. Drugs for Cholesterol, Inflammation, & Blood-Thinning.

No matter how well it works, though, one can essentially eliminate risk of heart disease with a healthy-enough diet. See my overview video How Not to Die from Heart Disease. But, if after doing everything right, your cholesterol is still too high, amla may help.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

225 responses to “The Best Food for High Cholesterol

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    1. @Janis Fresh gooseberries? You lucky woman! They’ll work great! They won’t be as concentrated as powdered gooseberries but as you can see from Dr. Greger’s other Amla videos, it only takes a berry or two to get amazing results.

      I do want to caution you though- there are Barbados gooseberries, Cape gooseberries, Chinese gooseberries (also known as kiwi fruit), Jamaican gooseberries, and Tahitian, or star gooseberries. You’ll want to check to make sure you have authentic Indian gooseberries in your yard.




      16
    2. JANIs
      No they are not the same , your gooseberries are closely related to currants and are sweet and make great jam , but alma is phyllanthus emblica and yours are most likely ribes uva-crispa .




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  1. Ok, I’m on board again… but I’d really like to know that these herbs are not tainted with lead, mercury, and arsenic. In a knee-jerk reaction I threw out my last batch of Amla after watching this video, made back in 2012: https://nutritionfacts.org/video/some-ayurvedic-medicine-worse-than-lead-paint-exposure/

    Starting at the turn of this century researchers tested herbal supplements at several “Boston South Asian grocery stores” and found one-in-five had potentially harmful levels of Pb, Hg, and/or As. Initially the topic of the video seemed to be centered on Triphala, but the theme switched midstream to discuss the possible downside risk of consuming Indian herbal supplements in general. Hmmm.

    Can someone recommend a high quality, low risk Amla product? I’d like to get back in.

    Terrasoul Organic was what I bought last time.




    24
    1. I, too, have concerns about heavy metal contamination in foodstuffs from India, including amla. Any word on widespread objective testing, and the results? I could see stirring some amla powder into a glass of water then doing a lead test on that solution at home, but no idea how one might test for mercury and arsenic at home. !!




      10
      1. Wasn’t the “Nutritionfacts.org research fund” doing things like this, sending things off to the lab to be tested for contamination? I seem to recall that happening once and then never heard about it again. It might be nice to start it up again and test these Indian products.




        14
        1. If my memory serves, the Nutritionfacts.org research fund found all the brands of amla tested were safe. Maybe that’s because Amla is a tree fruit, so it doesn’t get contaminated by foul water and sprays like the leafy ground grown plants put into supplements.




          4
              1. Thanks, TG. We saw this video in 2012. Since then we have bought Trifala that promises to be free oa all heavy metals on the internet. But we really would like some testing so we can know what is going on. 5 years have passed since that scary video. Does anyone have more recent news on Trifala or Amla?




                0
                1. Thank you for your question. Dr Greger has not revisited the issue of contamination and you should continue to make sure your source of these supplements are guaranteed to be free of heavy metals. My assumption is that this problem has not gone away as our environment in general including soil and water has become more contaminated over the last 5 years with many governments failing to address these issues. We await with anticipation the next video by Dr Greger on the effects of amla on cholesterol




                  1
    2. I did try this a couple of years ago after seeing earlier videos on the topic. I used 1 tsp per day along with 1/4 tsp tumeric for months. Made no difference for me and I had blood tests done. I thought perhaps post-menopausal dwindling estrogen won out over the amla in keeping my cholesterol high. It’s very frustrating!




      4
        1. WFPBRunner: ty for your reply and the link. It was interesting to see that the experimental group included women up to 60 yrs. Though results for each person was not detailed it gives me hope that maybe the influence of declining estrogen levels on cholesterol levels can be impacted. I walk a lot daily and do my physio/pilates exercises 2 x wk. . I will keep reading, thanks!




          2
          1. I am in the group of people whose LDL cholesterol hasn’t budged as much as expected consuming one teaspoon of amla daily. Would it be beneficial to take two teaspoons of amla daily?




            2
            1. Karen,

              it certainly can’t hurt, so give it a try and let us know. Just drink enough water with it to prevent constipation.

              Moderator Adam P.




              2
        2. Hello WFPBRunner
          cardio? I was an elite athlete, WFPB, Pritikan style, training up to 5 hours a day nearly every day (swimming), 25 years old, and STILL had high cholesterol……maybe when you are doing everything wrong and you change to most things right, it will make a difference, but how about when most things are right and there is not much more you can change?




          2
      1. If you look at the current video carefully, you will see that in the 2011 study on the effects of amla on blood lipids and glucose, the experiments on blood lipids used not amla alone, but amla and glibenclamide together as the experimental intervention. Glibenclamide is a diabetes drug. Who knows what the effects of amla alone would have been? There is no way to know from those experiments alone.




        0
    3. I’d like to see recommendations for a reliable source for powdered amla, too.

      Also, anecdotal information often being useful, can any other NF-ers report good, bad or indifferent blood test results after taking amla?

      Thanks in advance!




      4
        1. Kiwi don’t have amla. Different plant, different botanical family. Decades ago, kiwi were referred to as Chinese gooseberrry, but not related.




          3
      1. Hi JCarol and others – Looks like there are a lot of good recommendations here and I’ll just add one more – one year Dr. Greger sent us amla powder as a gift and the brand was Terrasoul (organic).




        0
    4. After Dr. Greger’s earlier videos, I became interested in trying to find a source of non contaminated amla (actually I decided to look for triphala which contains amala as well as two other dried fruit powders, apparently myrobalan and belleric myrobalan which are also supposed to be health promoting). I ran down an online distributor (Z Natural Foods) that was selling “organic triphala”. I emailed them, described my concerns, and asked if organic in this case also meant tested for heavy metals. They assured me that their product didn’t contain excessive heavy metals. That seemed sufficient to me and I took them at their word, but I guess if one really wants to be sure one should have a sample tested. They were a good source but I now shop at a local source, Rainbow Groceries in San Francisco, that also sells organic triphala with the same apparent guarantee.




      2
    5. Hi Dr. Cobalt, I recently purchased amla powder from AnthonysGoods. They are organic. I tried to copy the photo but this site wouldn’t let me.




      1
      1. You can copy anything from a web page if you download Snipping Tool and use it. It copies any part of a page without using the copy command.




        0
    6. Maharishi Ayurveda Premium Amla Berry.

      http://www.mapi.com.

      It’s produced to Western hygiene standards and is tested multiple times for heavy metals and other contaminants.

      This product is concentrated amla produced using an ancient process of drying amla pulp then reconstituting it with amla juice, multiple times.

      I’ve been using it for years and love it.

      Here is their website info on testing for contamination:

      Tested and Safe

      Our Commitment to Purity

      Maharishi Ayurveda USA uses only ingredients and herbal products that meet our rigorous standards for safety. We follow the traditional methods of Ayurveda while employing the highest standards of quality control. To ensure purity, Maharishi Ayurveda USA products are tested before, during and after manufacture and then tested again by an A2LA accredited independent analytical laboratory in the US (that meets ISO 17025:1999 standards), prior to distribution.

      These tests include examination for:

      Heavy metals (lead, arsenic, cadmium and mercury)
      Residual pesticides
      Microbiological contamination (including E. coli, coliforms, staph and salmonella)
      MAPI’s products far exceed the standards set by:

      American Herbal Products Association (AHPA), which specifies that dietary supplements should not contain more than 6 micrograms per day of lead.
      The World Health Organization’s provisional tolerable weekly lead intake level (PTWI) of 25 micrograms of lead per kilogram of body weight, which would be a daily tolerance level of 250 micrograms per day for an adult weighing 70 kg or 154 lbs.1

      The American National Standards Institute (ANSI), which specifies that dietary supplements should not contain more than 20 micrograms per day of lead.2

      Our manufacturing facilities carry multiple certifications including:

      ISO-9001 Certification – The ISO (International Organization for Standardization) – ISO is the world’s largest developer and publisher of International Standards. Maharishi Ayurveda Products International meets the ISO’s stringent requirements for quality in the design, production, and export of herbal products.
      Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP & cGMP) Certification – Conducted by an independent panel of experts; certifies that Maharishi Ayurveda Products International products are “fault-free, safe and have consistent quality.”
      As a leader in the global resurgence of Ayurveda, Maharishi Ayurveda USA embraces several guiding principles, including rigorous testing and a health model that supports balance in mind, body and spirit.

      We take your health and well-being seriously. It is our highest priority and founding principle.

      1 “Exposure of children to chemical hazards in food,” World Health Organization. Fact Sheet No. 4.4. May 2007. http://www.euro.who.int/en. This document refers to the following document as the source of PTWI: Global Environment Monitoring System – Food Contamination Monitoring and Assessment Programme (GEMS/Food) Contaminants Database [online database].

      2 NSF International Standard/American National Standard #173 for Dietary Supplements. Ann Arbor, MI: NSF International; 2006.




      2
      1. hi AdamP, just thought of a video that Dr Greger did sometime in the last couple of years about vegies rich in antioxidants impacting a ‘switch’ (for lack of better word) that signals breathing for babies in the womb. As I recall, Dr G warned moms-to-be about consuming excessively antioxodant packed food in the last trimester? Please ask Dr Greger about the video since Amla is highest in antioxidants. Thank you!




        0
  2. I’ve been taking about a teaspoon in my smoothies every morning. My cholesterol levels are still too high and I’ve been plant-based, whole food, unprocessed for several years now. I’m wondering if it should be taken alone on an empty stomach or some other combination to get the impact. Just wondering if I am combining it with something that is making it less effective.




    9
    1. Hi Brenda,
      Your info is fascinating to me! I am wondering if you are vegan or just vegetarian, and if you’ve had a carotid artery scan to check for plaque deposits? I ask because I’ve had super high cholesterol for awhile now and I’m trying various things to lower it, even though my carotid and small heart arteries are all clear which is the goal anyway.




      8
      1. I have not had any tests since going plant-based. Speaking to a cardiologist I’m told since I am not adding to the damage I should be just fine. I would just like to have my total cholesterol at 150 or lower – it fluctuates from 200 to 220. It used to be 360 so far better. I increased a lot of cholesterol-lowering foods – eggplant, oat groats, etc. It seems stuck so far. But it isn’t high enough to suggest a genetic link. I’m odd anyway.




        5
        1. Brenda, others on this site have commented that they had to eliminate all oils and some even needed to eliminate avocados, nuts and seeds to lower their cholesterol. It would be worth trying for a month and then being tested to see if there’s a change. In any event, oil shouldn’t be part of the diet.




          0
          1. I eliminated oils years ago – I make my own food at home so I know it contains zero oil. I don’t eat avocados. I do eat walnuts as well as seeds, neither present a problem based on the science as long as I keep the amounts small.




            0
    2. Hi Brenda – I’m with you; I’m WFPB and take triphala (containing amla) in my smoothies (as well as hibiscus and blueberries which though not as high in antioxidants as amla shouldn’t hurt !) and my cholesterol is somewhat troublesome (I’m “high normal”, I forget the # at the moment, but in the US population “high normal” seems far from healthy). The more I hear about others in the same situation the more I feel like there must be some genetic component re. cholesterol levels.




      3
      1. Karl,

        Are you eating Oatmeal? If not, try adding Oatmeal or Steel Cut Oats to your diet. I did that for a few years and my cholesterol ratio is very good according to my MD. Sorry, don’t recall the #s, however he commented that they were the best he has ever seen.




        7
        1. B’Healthy, thanks for the tip but sadly I already do that to little effect re. cholesterol numbers. I think that if in the future an archeologist were to discover a dried remnant of my smoothie, they would have an excellent recored of everything that early 21st century health practitioners recommended, dietarily, re. trying to control cholesterol.




          0
      2. Hi Karl –

        I eat the blueberries and hibiscus as well and just about every other food indicated to lower it. From what I’ve read on genetics it has to be real high and remain there. I have gotten mine down more than 150 points and am told I am safer since I eat zero that would add to it. No animal products, processed foods, added salt, sugar or oil. So I’m not causing further damage. If I could get it to the 150 or lower I could also get my physician off my back. I won’t back down, no statins for me, but it is annoying doing the same dance.




        7
        1. Yeah, me too. every year, my doctor tells me to ‘eat better.’ And then I remind her of what I eat. She says she doesn’t know why. Says it must be genetic. My mom did have high cholesterol and did go on statins. But no drugs, thank you very much.




          3
        2. The liver regulates HDL and LDL levels in the blood

          LDL takes cholesterol from: liver to cells
          HDL takes excess cholesterol from: cells to liver

          unsaturated fats increase HDL. saturated fats increase LDL. The liver likes to do things at a time. If it is busy doing something, it won’t do something else. For example, if you take medications that overwhelm the liver, it may not do the cholesterol job right.




          3
          1. To make amla work, I think you have to take it with water only. It is the flavor that triggers the liver. If you mix it in a smoothy there are no effects.




            0
            1. Bitterness (amla flavor) stimulates the the liver to produce bile.

              http://www.vivo.colostate.edu/hbooks/pathphys/digestion/liver/bile.html

              “Secretion into bile is a major route for eliminating cholesterol.

              Hepatic synthesis of bile acids accounts for the majority of cholesterol breakdown in the body. In humans, roughly 500 mg of cholesterol are converted to bile acids and eliminated in bile every day.

              Interestingly, it has recently been demonstrated that bile acids participate in cholesterol metabolism by functioning as hormones that alter the transcription of the rate-limiting enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis. “




              0
        3. Amen to that Brenda; I’m consuming nothing that’s contraindicated for cholesterol levels and presumably, like you, consuming things that should help, but I don’t seem to get my levels down below high “normal”. Though my doctor is completely supportive of my WFPB diet (she just checked my vitamin B levels which were fine) she nonetheless felt like she had to make the recommendation re. the “company formula” (Kaiser) for age, weight, cholesterol (who knows what else – I guess they’d tell me if I asked) and suggested I consider statins as a preventative measure. I just laughed and she “agreed” that we’d just “keep an eye on things”. I guess I wouldn’t say she’s on my back but just having to deal with the suggestion is kind of annoying. Given our earlier conversations, I would have hoped she could have at least prefaced things with something like, “what can we work on to keep you off of statins…” – then I would have been able to respond with something like “less pharmaceutical company lobbying maybe ?”.




          2
          1. Perhaps she is just basing her approach on what the evidence shows?

            I had liver damage when I took statins a long time ago, That is is what started me on my journey to a WFPB diet.

            However, the evidence for their effectiveness and relative safety is pretty compelling. Even Esselstyn and McDougall use or have used statins in some of their high risk patients eg
            https://www.forksoverknives.com/who-should-take-cholesterol-lowering-statins-everyone-or-no-one/#gs.Jy7fzLo

            Do you drink coffee? Switching to filtered coffee may help bring your levels down
            https://academic.oup.com/aje/article/153/4/353/129046/Coffee-Consumption-and-Serum-Lipids-A-Meta




            4
          2. One other thought: do you include soy foods in your diet?

            “A recent meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials concluded that intake of either soy products (i.e., whole soybeans, soy milk, nuts, oil, and flour), soy protein isolate, or soy isoflavones for one month to one year could significantly improve serum lipid profiles in healthy and hypercholesterolemic individuals by lowering circulating triglycerides, total cholesterol, and LDL-cholesterol, and by increasing HDL-cholesterol (96).”
            http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/mic/dietary-factors/phytochemicals/soy-isoflavones#cardiovascular-disease-prevention




            4
          3. I was at a lecture with Michael Klaper, MD earlier this year and he said something I never heard before or since…adults who were breast fed as infants tended to have lower cholesterol. Those who were given formula, higher. I found that really interesting (I wasn’t breast fed.) I’m in the same boat as you, Brenda and Karl. My doc has never recommended statins because my HDL numbers are high, but I really want to get my overall number down.

            Not long ago I heard Dr. G recommend David Junkin MD’s portfolio diet which you can find here: http://andytherd.com/2015/12/29/made-in-canada-revisiting-dr-jenkins-and-his-portfolio-diet-for-lowering-cholesterol/. I can’t bring myself to eat the margarine, but am trying to eat eggplant, okra, and a little psyllium husk powder regularly — slimy things.




            3
          4. My doctor is learning. I handed him How Not To Die, he read the title out loud then responded, “Eat plants.” So he knows but I think it is just a lack of knowing what to do. I’ve learned to stop arguing and just sitting back while he reviews my lab results. Last time he said – oh your kidneys have improved. He looked further into past results and said, “really improved.” I kept quiet and let him consider why. He knows it is due to how I eat and he stopped telling me I needed to add some fish or a little meat. Now he says I’m not telling you to change anything about how you eat. That is huge from how we started when I used to get in his face. I needed to respect his years of education versus the videos I’ve watched and books I’ve read. He wasn’t taught so I’m teaching him a little at a time. I had a bad reaction to statins and took myself off after a doctor said doctors won’t discontinue them for fear if something happens they will get sued. My next attempt is to try to eat greens multiple times a day – I eat them but only once or twice.




            4
        4. Brenda sorry if I missed where you may have said you do some form of cardio. I mean really sweat.
          Last year I injured my Achilles’ tendon and took some time off to heal. After about 6 weeks I had blood work done. My total cholesterol went up 30 and LDL 20 points. That was eye opening for me. I always knew that was what the science showed but I saw it first hand. So if you don’t exercise lace up those shoes.

          http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJM199807023390103#t=article
          Old article but it also emphasizes weight which is also important. There are more recent articles if are interested. I always find the discussion sections most interesting.




          1
          1. Hi WFPBRunner –

            I was working with a plant-based cardiologist on exercising. I have some serious issues due to radiation directly on the heart in high doses. When I work the heart I crash. My BMI is 19-20 so my weight is good. I’m a unique case in all the treatments, including some serious chemotherapy, in my past that likely have caused irreversible damage – like the radiation to my lung which has resulted in mild COPD. Tissue is destroyed so it can’t be improved on. I suspect the same is true of my heart. Perhaps over time with tissue renewal it may get better – hard to know since there aren’t many of us out there to study and no money in studying us. The cardiologist said she was amazed by how well I am doing considering all the damage. I appreciate your input.




            3
              1. Thanks, WFPBRunner –

                I have my moments. Went Kayaking for three hours, even stayed ahead of at least half the group. Had a wonderful time and felt great. Then crashed for three days – ugh. Can’t afford to keep doing that. I would love to run but just not right now.




                0
        5. Hi all,

          l too have high Cholesterol but after listening to Dr Gregor and ground flax seed l now take two large tablespoons every day sometimes with oatmeal other times in a smoothie. First reading before was 268 after 6 months down to 226, still have a way to go oh and on top of that went vegan!!




          4
          1. I dropped my total cholesterol from 185 to 120 on the Pritikin diet (with LDL below 100). But I did it on the old Pritikin diet, which excludes all nuts, seeds and oils. Dr. Greger recommends nuts and seeds, but Pritikin forbad them. I now eat nuts and seeds, and my cholesterol and LDL are higher, as is my blood sugar. On Pritikin, my fasting glucose was in the 70’s. Now it’s up into the 80’s. Also, Pritikin forbad dried fruit like raisins and dates, and recommended only 2 to 3 pieces of fruit a day. Also no other fats on that diet, except that you can have one olive! ;-). No dairy fat of any kind, no eggs (cholesterol intake should not exceed 100 mg/day). Pritikin did allow a small amount of meat or fish (3 ounces/day). But he said that fatty fish like sardines should be half that. No refined grains and no sugar. The diet does work to lower cholesterol, and it can lower it a lot, but it’s not an easy one to follow for someone who is used to a higher-fat diet, and it is especially challenging for someone who is used to the standard American diet.




            0
      3. For what it’s worth–I stopped my sometime treat of dark chocolate bars this past year along with oil and my cholesterol went down. I’m around 156 or so and my LDL and HDL are fine.




        5
    3. Me too. Been WFPB for about 8 years now. I run 4 miles 4 days a week and spin for an hour two days a week. I lift weights once or twice a week. And still my cholesterol hovers near 200. Grrrr…. I’ll try the Amla again, but it didn’t seem to make much difference the last time I tried it. I got mine from Mountain Rose Herbs, too.




      1
      1. Kathy, as per some of the above discussion, there are others of us (vegan types) who share your frustration re. cholesterol levels. But I was under the impression that the antioxidants in amla were useful re. other health concerns as well. So, though it hasn’t helped much with my cholesterol I keep taking it, maybe being delusional, in that it I’m assuming it might be helping in other areas.




        1
    4. Hi, Brenda_plantbased. What else is in your smoothies? It is possible that there is some combination making the amla less effective. You could try just the amla in water alone, and see if that makes a difference. It may just be that your natural cholesterol level is higher, which does happen. If you are not taking in any dietary cholesterol, as would be the case on a whole food, plants-only diet, and you are doing all you can to lower your cholesterol, but your levels are not reducing, then that may be the case. What is your saturated fat and sugar intake, if any?




      0
  3. Would it be the same amount of freeze-dried Amla (1/2 teaspoon) or should I increase it to a full teaspoon since I don’t have the powder?
    Thanks




    1
    1. Hi, -I am a nutritionist and moderator in NF team. The BEST way to eat almost any kind of food is FRESH because this way the food keeps more vitamins and phitonutrients. I would suggest to you increase 1/4 the normal dosis so that you can balance the same benefits.




      1
    2. I checked the study Dr. Greger cites, and they used 2 to 3 grams of amla to get their results. Dr. Greger says 1/2 teaspoon, but I weighed 1/2 teaspoon of amla on an ultra-sensitive scale, and got 1.18 grams. So if you’re going to duplicate the amount used in the study, I’d take a full teaspoon.




      0
    1. Spoiler:

      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22529483

      RESULTS:
      Treatment with Amla produced significant reduction of TC (P<0.0001), LDL (P<0.0001), triglyceride (TG) and VLDL (P<0.0002), and a significant increase in HDL levels (P<0.0002). Similarly, treatment with simvastatin produced significant reduction of TC (P<0.0001), LDL (P<0.0009), TG and VLDL (P<0.017), and a significant increase in HDL levels (P<0.0001). Both treatments produced significant reduction in blood pressure; however, this beneficial effect was more marked in patients receiving Amla.

      CONCLUSION:
      In view of the above findings, it is suggested that Amla produced significant hypolipidemic effect along with a reduction in blood pressure. Addition of Amla to the currently available hypolipidemic therapy would offer significant protection against atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease, with reduction in the dose and adverse effects of the hypolipidemic agents.




      12
      1. Interesting, but did you find any studies coming from countries where the amla berrie has not been worshipped through the ages? I’m begining to suspect that we are looking at results that might be a bit too positive bacause they originate from the cultural looking glass of Indian and Pakistani researchers.




        5
        1. It may be genetic differences instead of or as well as cultural differences.

          For example Asians seem to be more prone to type 2 diabetes than people of European ancestry and may have more visceral fat.
          http://asiandiabetesprevention.org/what-is-diabetes/why-are-asians-higher-risk

          Apparently cholesterol disorders are more common in South Asians too so they may react differently in this respect than people of European descent.
          http://www.pamf.org/southasian/support/handouts/cholesterol.pdf




          3
        2. Thank you for your comment and you may be correct. However, in general, from studies conducted around the world, that plant based diets are the best at maintaining a healthy cholesterol level. It is unlikely that one single food in the diet is going to be the cure for all our problems and we need to consider nutrition as a whole, not just as individual parts. I look forward to Dr Greger’s next video with the results of a randomised study using Amla.




          3
  4. Has the doctor researched Pantethine?

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3942300/
    Pantethine, a derivative of vitamin B5, favorably alters total, LDL and non-HDL cholesterol in low to moderate cardiovascular risk subjects eligible for statin therapy: a triple-blinded placebo and diet-controlled investigation

    http://sci-hub.bz/10.1016/j.nutres.2011.08.001
    Pantethine, a derivative of vitamin B5 used as a nutritional supplement, favorably alters low-density lipoprotein cholesterol metabolism in low– to moderate–cardiovascular risk North American subjects: a triple-blinded placebo and diet-controlled investigation

    There’s also Coenzyme A
    http://sci-hub.bz/10.1016/j.jacl.2015.07.003
    Efficacy and tolerability of coenzyme A versus pantethine for the treatment of patients with hyperlipidemia: A randomized, double-blind, multicenter study

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3881496/
    Efficacy and tolerability of adding coenzyme A 400 U/d capsule to stable statin therapy for the treatment of patients with mixed dyslipidemia: an 8-week, multicenter, double-Blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study




    4
  5. “LDL below 70”, so here you hear clearly and soundly from your master.

    While I agree that “cholesterol” should be kept low, as a GOAL, and I agree with the above video about eating foods to lower “cholesterol”, I will comment later about this half a century old “cholesterol” theory.




    3
    1. Despite your sarcasm, Jerry, Dr G is simply reflecting what the science shows. Don’t attack the messenger for faithfully reporting what the scientific evidence shows. That is what he is here for. And insulting the other visitors to this site isn’t particularly constructive either.

      “The new meta-analysis, published July 28, 2014 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, suggests that lowering LDL-cholesterol levels to very low levels results in a significant reduction in cardiovascular events. Individuals with LDL-cholesterol levels <50 mg/dL had a significantly lower risk of major cardiovascular events compared with individuals who had higher LDL-cholesterol levels, including those with LDL levels 50 to <75 mg/dL and 75 to <100 mg/dL."
      https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/828967

      If you really want to hear only what you want to hear about cholesterol, there are plenty of sites that cater to people in denial. There is no need to bend our ears on each and every video with your fringe beliefs. Most of us prefer to hear about the real science rather than fringe pseudoscience.




      13
        1. Marvin there is a really great analogy regarding HDL. If you don’t have any trash (cholesterol) then there is no need for more trash trucks-HDL. (Dr. Mcdougal I believe is who I heard say it first?) Anyhow if you have made all the life style changes and you still have numbers that aren’t perfect don’t sweat it. (Diet, exercise, stress)




          3
  6. Why not link to these products that you write about as a value-add to your readers? It would be a good source of revenue for you as well, no?




    0
    1. Darlene, not sure what the relation between your tongue and cheek re. that comment was, but if serious, I would like to argue for the opposite, i.e. Dr. Greger please don’t do that. There are plenty of websites you can frequent that blur the distinction between public and self service and it’s a treat to have one that doesn’t seem to have a problem with that (or at least has me blissfully fooled).




      17
  7. For those looking for good sources of amla, I buy dried amla berries from Mountain Rose Herbs. I like using the dried berries, I can see what they are. I worried about adulteration when buying amla powder from the local Asian/Indian grocery store.

    I drop a half-teaspoon of dried berries onto the top of my morning smoothie and eat it when it re-hydrates. I like the sour pop! in my mouth.

    Amla can darken gray hair to brown if used like henna, if you need a non-toxic hair tint. Indians have used it for that for centuries.




    10
    1. Anne that is so interesting. Are you using it like a hair mask? I was just reading that it is great for Hair but I was wondering how they use it. Supposed to make it shine.




      2
  8. Is the university of Pakistan something trustworthy? I’m not being sarcastic it’s a real question, because it provides the bulk of the research quoted. Also, the other research is coming from India, are there any spectacular studies available from countries where the particular berrie has not been worshipped trough the ages?




    4
    1. Hi Netgogate, thanks for your comment. I found a review article that you might find interesting as Indian Gooseberry (Phyllanthus embolic) has been studies for its anticancer and other antioxidant properties. The bioactivity in this extract is thought to be principally mediated by polyphenols, especially tannins and flavonoids. Phyllanthus embolic is a tree indigenous to tropical regions of Southeast Asia so that is probably why it is studied in India and Pakistan more commonly.
      Anticancer Properties of Phyllanthus emblica (Indian Gooseberry)




      4
      1. Hi WFPBRunner, thanks for your comment. I looked at the comments from yesterday about the probiotics and I just want to point out for the website followers that the videos on a particular topics that comes out are based on new research findings on a particular area of nutrition. At the end of the day individuals have to decide what action they take with these new scientefic information whether it applies to them or not. I think we can all use this platform to help each other and bring up the consciousness of humanity not humility.
        Thank you WFBRunner for your support of Dr Greger.




        1
            1. Hi Gale, thanks for your quick reply. As I was sorry if you misunderstood me. Since you asked me how I respond to Jerry and that was my respond to him.
              Yes, I try to say to all participants who show uncharastristic tone that we are all here to learn and we can be respectful and appreciate of all the hard work that goes into this website to provide sound scientific information for free to the general public. I enjoy your comments and all the moderators and learn from them please don’t let it get to you. Thanks again




              3
              1. hi Spring. From our perspective, NF is failing to support a community of medical professionals and long-time NF enthusiasts who contribute enormously to disseminating the info provided in Dr Greger’s videos and articles. Always there are questions about the concepts, the applicability in individual lives, or the research itself. The environment on this forum has been steadily degraded primarily one individual and our point is that NF can ill afford this to happen given the importance of the forum in presenting info. Its just not worth persevering. This is not a fun time wading through garbage.




                4
            2. Gale et al, you guys and gals are funny. You need to look at yourselves in the mirror to see what you are doing everyday. Every day, I endure countless of insults including 4-letter word, profiling. comparison to every imaginary creatures on earth, etc. And this is not coming out from the usual obnoxious guys and gals but also from guy who are supposedly the most intellectual and cool guy whom I exchanged recommendations on health several times in the past, but he can be nice and civil one day or one post and the next day or next post, he would call me by any name he can think of.

              Also, you guys and gals routinely insult other health doctors, some of which have web sites that Dr G appeared several times on. Just because those health doctors have different point of view than Dr G or sometimes same point of view of WFPB, but you guys don’t want to see it, but they don’t deserve to be insulted because they all try to make us more healthy, even with their financial gain that comes along, but everyone has to make money including you and me.

              So I used to have a bad temper and I would blow up in the past but since I consume healthy fats these day, I am pretty calm and keep my cool – trust me, it does work for your brain and I highly recommend that you try it.

              And last but not least, I thanks Dr Greger and the moderators for staying cool and offering a forum for us to discuss different opinions on health. Although we may differ greatly and at times there seem to be some heated discussions, but that’s a healthy sign that we care about our health but solutions may be diverse, but a common goal is to get rid of Big Pharma and Big Foods. Until then, World Peace cannot be achieved.




              4
              1. Fair enough Jerry. Obviously 2 sides. Scroll above and see the message where you are saying we need to hear from our “Master” on the 70 LDL. That attitude is constant. Is it really necessary?

                Let me explain my complaints a bit better. Thirty years ago if you went to a health provider the MD treating you had learned from mentors. He practiced the same medicine and so it continued. And then finally someone said but wait how do we know that old Dr. Smith is doing the best thing for the patient? And from that question came Evidence Based Practice. So the long and the short is that health practitioners must practice following current research. (Trust me in physical therapy this is huge.) That change was so important because we found out that more lives were saved by not just continuing to practice as Dr. Smith had but rather seeing what the science said.

                And so yes nutrition science can be a bit messy but what cardiologists tell their patients now is the best we know. Lower your cholesterol. Maintain a healthy weight. Limit your saturated fats. Sweat everyday. Have positive loving relationships. (get a dog?) Please see Dr. Greger’s videos on heart disease above.

                So Jerry if you have research that brings the above into question share it.




                9
                1. Gale, look at your own post yesterday. Either you have problem with the truth or you have sign of Alzheimer’s.

                  https://nutritionfacts.org/2017/10/26/foods-to-eat-to-help-prevent-diabetes

                  “Nina Dr. Greger has never said “your entire heart health depends on getting your LDL below 70.”

                  There are videos on the role inflammation plays. There on videos on the importance of exercise. There are videos on saturated fat. There are videos on the mechanism high blood pressure plays. There are videos on obesity. “.




                  0
                2. I’m sorry, Jerry, but this idea that you come here to discuss scientific evidence with an ‘agree to disagree’ attitude & that you’re a victim of our bad will is ludicrous & just another one of your fantasies. Especially since you’ve made it clear that you’re not interested in either looking at or trying to understand the scientific evidence. You have yet to bring a single shred of evidence to back up any of your claims, & it’s obvious by now that you have no intention of doing so. You don’t come here with questions or to learn (or even to watch the videos). You come here with an agenda to promote your own opinions & not to discuss science. For months, I have watched you happily & arrogantly lie, manipulate & deceive. I’ve watched you try to destroy the community we’ve built here in this comment section. I’ve watched you bring out the worst in people, not the best, including myself, and you’ve done it happily, which is sad & pathetic.
                  If you feel you’ve been mistreated here, you brought it on yourself with your own arrogant, know-it-all attitude. If anyone has been disrespectful, it is you. You have disrespected people who have significantly more knowledge & goodwill than you have ever shown anyone in this forum.

                  Let me be clear here, it’s not you that I don’t like. Rather, it’s what you do & how you go about doing it that I don’t like. It’s not your opinions that I don’t like. It’s the manipulative, deceptive & arrogant way you go about trying to shove your opinions down everyone’s throat.

                  To everyone else: if the NF staff aren’t willing to create boundaries for this forum that might protect the integrity of their work & protect the integrity of the community that we’ve built here, then I think it’s up to us to do something ourselves. We can’t prevent the trolls from parachuting in, camping out, & trying to hijack the comments section, but we don’t have to waste our time & energy dealing with them.

                  So, from this day forward, I vow never to read any of Jerry Lewis’ comments ever again.

                  If he responds to this or any other comment of mine, he’ll be talking to the wall. With disqus we could have blocked him, but unfortunately with this new system, which apparently none of us like, we can’t do that. But we can do it ourselves manually.
                  As for newcomers, while it’s noble to want to protect them from him, as he presents himself to them as being all-knowing, is it really our job? If the NF staff doesn’t care about him hijacking the comment section & possibly distorting the integrity of the NF message, then why should we? Besides, the videos & blog posts should speak for themselves. As spring03 said, people can decide for themselves. But we can protect ourselves, our time & our energy & continue to discuss the science amongst ourselves & with newcomers.

                  Anyone want to join me in this simple (albeit not perfect) solution?




                  9
                1. Very well said Nancy and I am in agreement ! And I would have replied under your comment but … there’s no Reply buttons LOL! It’s a plot.. I’m sure of it..




                  4
                2. Tom, if you’re still tuning in, I just wanted to let you know that I recently received a letter from A BrightFocus Foundation who is looking for funding for what they’re calling Macular Degeneration Research. In the letter they stated:

                  “In a major scientific breakthrough, Macular Degeneration Research-funded scientists found that the drug L-DOPA, widely used to treat people with Parkinson’s disease, is showing early evidence of protection against age-related macular degeneration.”

                  “Another team we funded discovered the mineral “scaffolding” for waste buildup in the eye that ultimately leads to AMD. This important discovery could lead to much earlier diagnosis and treatment to save sight.”

                  They also claim to do research on glaucoma. I was wondering if you’ve ever heard of this organization & the work they do. My retina specialist had never heard of them & tried to look up some information on them during my mother’s appointment last week. But the internet in his office was slow, & we didn’t find much of the research they were claiming in the letter.

                  Their website is brightfocus.org. They’re in Clarksburg, MD. If you decided to look into them, please let me know if you find anything interesting, especially on AMD, & I’ll do the same for you. My retina specialist said he would try to look into it further. I bring my mother to monthly visits, so will keep you posted if he finds anything interesting.




                  0
                3. I know, susan. The reply button disappears after so many levels in. People don’t need to reply to me. They have only to join us. Or not.

                  Also, I wanted to edit something I said. Instead of “If the NF staff doesn’t care”, I’d like to change that to “If the NF staff isn’t worried about…” I’m sure they do care.




                  1
              2. @Jerry Lewis: You eat the flesh and secretions from exploited, enslaved, abused and murdered innocent sentient beings.

                Vegans eat only plant based and are healthier for it.

                Which one of us sounds like we’re in a cult?

                You literally sacrifice an animal.

                You should look at yourself in the mirror.




                9
              3. Thanks Nancy for the information about Bright Focus. I had not heard of them but then I am not from the US.

                In truth, I am somewhat cynical about foundations and charities. In my previous life, I used to manage national grant funding provided to various charities and other non-profits to deliver healthcare services. Setting up and running these things can be the royal road to wealth. The CEOs and top execs (and board) frequently pay themselves very generous salary packages from the donations of people who are much poorer than they are. The other technique is for the President/board to pay themselves a meagre salary but outsource management to an external company, which they or their family happen to own, on very generous terms. i think with BrightFocus the CEO has a salary of $380,000

                However, I will have a look, thanks.




                2
                1. Yes, TG, I’m very skeptical of these kinds of organizations, too, & so is my retina specialist. So I won’t be sending them any money. But you never know. They may have helped fund a study or two that might have some interesting.




                  1
                2. CHARITABLE GIVING

                  There are several national indexes of charities, in which readers may evaluate the efficiency and mission-focus of any national charity. Particularly helpful are the columns about salaries and percentage of “overhead”– in too many cases, a charity spends more on self-promotion and salaries for “staff and management” than on actual disbursements to nominal beneficiaries..

                  Charity Navigator– outstanding power, clarity and ease of use–
                  https://www.charitynavigator.org/index.cfm?bay=search.alpha&ltr=N

                  The National Center for Charitable Statistics– All about Charities, as an Industry–
                  http://nccs.urban.org/frequently-asked-questions




                  1
              4. @WFPB Nancy and WFPBRunner– Thank you for your charitable and mature example in your responses. The benefits of charity far exceed any expense, and the benefits actually multiply themselves for you and all others on this forum, indefinitely. If the world’s conflict burdens us, charity gives us a foundation, compass and hope. “Blessed are the peacemakers.”

                * As others have pointed out, troll behavior is driven by low self-worth, so trolls eagerly battle others to rob them of their own. Since trolling is a disguised and perverse effort to command recognition and approval through “trial by combat”, reasoning with trolls is beside their purpose, and they could not care less about resolving any point with (or without) facts. If matters reach a point you believe the forum is significantly disrupted, there are forum scripts which can be used to isolate problem posters, and many provide an option to prevent further logins to WordPress and other blog-based forums. Trolls can be made to “disappear” suddenly, and never return.




                1
            3. Hi everyone – we are aware of the issues that some of you have with Jerry Lewis, as we thoroughly read the comments, as well as the private messages some of you have submitted. However, we have again and again deemed that Jerry is acting within the bounds of our guidelines, as we strive not to censor people who are simply talking about their nutritional habits and bringing other information to the discussion. If this changes, then we will take different action. We do currently remove specific comments as we see fit.

              For this reason, our moderators, who devote hours every week to answering medical and nutrition questions, have been asked by us not to engage in the argument between members of the community, as their role is to maintain focus on responding to the people who come here asking for help.

              Dr. Greger and the rest of the team love the community that has developed here on NutritionFacts.org, but we also ask everyone to remember that this is a public forum and we do not remove comments just because some people disagree with them. We agree with the proposal to ignore commenters with whom you don’t wish to engage. We have found some of the responses from some members to Jerry Lewis to be even more out of line with the community guidelines than the original content he has been posting.

              Further, we are currently working on installing a new commenting platform, and we will be releasing new community guidelines that will help make it more clear what is and is not allowed on the site.

              Any further complaints and attacks on users or moderators regarding this topic may be deleted to keep this conversation from growing.




              1
              1. Sooooo… instead of censoring the problem, we’re going to censor all of the people who want the problem fixed? ‘We’re protecting free speech by limiting everyone else’s free speech’?




                1
                1. Ryan: As our current guidelines state, we do not tolerate outright attacks on other community members, and therefore those will be removed. Regarding the issue at hand between certain community members, people are welcome to contact me privately, though we have been monitoring this for a while and our decision stands for the time being.




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  9. i add amla to my morning orange juice because i cannot discover if it loses its effectiveness
    if it is subject to heat. i am suspicious because amla seems to be included in smoothies.




    2
    1. For your question, I am working on a more substantial response, but Amla is widely available in the US. Amla requires latitudes above the USDA Zone 9b designation.

      Linked below is the latest (2018) USDA “Hardiness Zone” map for the United States, including Alaska and Hawaii. There is also a link to the Canadian map, as well. Sharper-eyed readers will notice USDA has dropped the “a” and “b” sub-climate designations of previous maps.

      USDA Plant Hardiness Zone Map 2018–
      https://www.seedsnow.com/pages/grow-zone-map-new

      USDA Plant Hardiness Zone Map 2018– interactive (ZIP code-driven)–
      http://planthardiness.ars.usda.gov/PHZMWeb/




      1
      1. Spoken too soon– USDA still uses the sub-climate designations. I had reviewed the 2018 map, which for some reason excluded the sub-climates.




        1
      2. Thanks alphaa10,

        I live in zone 8 so I think I will start some plants in my greenhouse this winter, time permitting, for later transplanting.




        0
  10. Could someone please help with information on a serious case of IgA nephropathy for my brother-in-law who is experiencing serious kidney malfunction?
    Thank you.




    1
    1. Hi, Lonie. I do not know very much about this, but my first impression is that this is just another gimmick to sell expensive water. I found a few research articles in which it was tested on mice for various conditions. A Huffington Post article is very positive, and states that the FDA has “GRAS Certified” it. To me, this implies that the FDA has tested it and determined that it is safe. The link in the article does not link to any FDA certification document, but merely to a definition of the term GRAS. I found the actual document, and it is a statement by the manufacturer that the product is safe, accompanied by supporting information, and stamped “RECEIVED” by the FDA. One abstract of an article in a medical journal expresses concerns about potential risks due to elevation of IFG-1. Another article touts benefits for gum disease in rats, but you can get the same effect from hydrogen peroxide, which is relatively cheap. That is my take so far on hydrogen water, but I will send your suggestion along to Dr. Greger. I hope that helps!




      1
      1. Thanks Christine, especially liked the Huffington Post link.

        I’ve been doing this for more than a week and I think I will continue. But in the event my doing so may be suggestive to others to do the same, I feel I need to add a few qualifiers that address some of the concerns you have.

        For one, I agree some products may not be legit. For that reason, I have taken something I’ve read (magnesium + Pure water = 2H2O) and drilled a hole in the lid of a pint jelly jar and after scraping off the outer coating of a magnesium flint striker (about 2 inches long) I insert that rod into the top of the lid on the jar filled with pure distilled water (RO water would probably work just as well.) I let the water set for hours and drink the entire amount, once in the morning and again in the evening.

        Some products say they put magnesium bits into their product (pills) that create the Hydrogen water once activated. That may be true but I can carry on my experiment for years at no additional cost.

        The raising of the IGF-1, though not definitive, caught my eye. I think I’ve got that pretty much in hand as I take Walnut oil (added to my MCT oil which I take for other reasons) and that is purported to hold down the expression of IGF-1.

        Thanks again for the info.




        0
  11. For those searching for a safe, uncontaminated source of Amla, I suggest Capros. swansonvitamins.com seems to have the best price. Because it is standardized it was the product chosen in multiple clinical trials which are available for review. It showed significant beneficial effects on lipids as well as endothelial function.




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  12. Aside from the fact that Capros has seven published studies behind it, the fact that it is in an inexpensive capsule form makes it much more convenient to take. Powdered amla is absolutely unpalatable and must be disguised in a smoothie to get it down.




    1
    1. I eat powdered amla in Trader Joe’s hummus and I also ferment the whole plant in chopped form. Some types of hummus are already too sour so they won’t work. I actually like it either way. At first I thought it was impossibly repulsive but I usually top the fermented mixed amla sauerkraut on my green salad and it just tastes like sauerkraut after fermentation. Works for me.
      John S




      1
  13. I remember eating gooseberries when younger and getting severe asthma from it, I was very confused about that since it was supposed to be so very good for me. Now, many years later, I have discovered that I have a homozygous snp in a sulfotransferase encoding gene called SULT1A1 (rs1042157), which means that I can’t metabolize foods with a high polyphenol content very well at all. I have to stay away from all high polyphenol/salicylate foods to stay well. So just a caution to anyone with asthma out there: more of these ‘healthy’ antioxidant rich foods is not always better.




    3
  14. http://www.nutrage.eu/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/A-Polyphenol-Based-Multicomponent-Nutraceutical-in-Dysmetabolism-and-Oxidative-Stress-Results-from-a-Pilot-Study.pdf
    A Polyphenol-Based Multicomponent Nutraceutical in Dysmetabolism and Oxidative Stress: Results from a Pilot Study

    “To assess short-term efficacy and safety of a multicomponent nutraceutical (MCN) on dysmetabolism and oxidative stress, a pilot prospective observational study was performed on 21 individuals (12 men and 9 women) who took, for 60 days, 2 tablets per day of an MCN based on antioxidants and metabolism regulators: hydroxytyrosol (15 mg), maqui (300 mg), amla (200 mg), monacolin K (10 mg), berberine (245 mg), astaxanthin (0.5 mg), coenzyme Q10 (100 mg), and folic acid (200 mcg).”




    0
  15. The source I use is Bulk Herb Store, Lobelville, TN . The bag is marked “Indian Gooseberry/Amalaki, Organic.” At $9.75 for a half-lb bag, that is $19.50 a pound, which I chose based on the price. I find it so bitter that I have to dilute it into my morning oatmeal.
    My breakfast is 1 cup oatmeal , 1 tsp amla, 1/4 tsp turmeric powder, pinch of black pepper, 3 tsp ground flax seed, almond milk to get the “right” texture, having put all this into a glass(Pyrex?) measuring cup. Then add a handful each of frozen blueberries and frozen sliced strawberries( I find the frozen berries in large bags at Sam’s Club.) Three minutes in the microwave has thawed the strawberries just about right so that I can cut up the strawberries with my eating spoon, blend everything again.




    6
    1. Sounds good except for the micro-wave nuking.

      It may not damage the ingredients at all, but it just seems intuitively, to me that it would. I personally would do it on a stove type thing ( I use an induction cook-top) and put the frozen berries in the hot oatmeal and let them thaw and cool by heat exchange. Also, I add a little MCT/Walnut oil to my oatmeal after cooking.




      0
  16. Statin drugs are modified mushroom poison. Both of them impair body cells’ abilities to create the cholesterol that all cells need.
    The poison does this in the extreme; the tweaked molecules of the statin drugs impair cholesterol production enough to force the cells to
    scavenge cholesterol from the blood stream. My question is, what the are side effects, if any, of gooseberry consumption? Is it possible
    to over-dose on gooseberries?




    2
    1. Floyd,

      there are side-effects: diabetics should avoid it since it can decrease blood sugar, taking gooseberry with ginger, Tinospora cordifolia, and Indian frankincense might make liver function worse in people with liver disease (but that’s just a theory). Gooseberry might increase the risk of bleeding during surgery, thus you need to stop taking it at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery. Overdose can cause constipation (it’s high in fiber), hyperacidity (it’s high in vit. C) and lower blood pressure.

      As you can see, just because something is natural, it doesn’t automatically mean it’s totally safe.

      Hope it helps,

      Moderator Adam P.




      5
  17. Self medication by eating curative plants have existed before humans existed. One benefit is that with self medication there is no middle man ($$$). Some people have been taught that they come from hospitals, and that bringing a body to a hospital is like bringing a car back to the dealer for service. What could happen if there were found better curative methods, like self medication in some cases, than the established institutions and hospitals?




    2
  18. I use an organic amla powder 90% of the time. However, I’m lucky in that there is an Indian supermarket in my town where they get the fresh amla berries in. They really are sour! I cut them up and freeze them and then drop some pieces into daily veggie smoothies. The seeds are an unusual shape; quite unique. They are more expensive than the powder though.




    4
  19. I hope someone can help me here. I attended Dr. G’s lecture in San Diego last Sunday. He recommends 3 supplements for vegans.
    B12, Amla and a 3rd that I didn’t quite catch. I think he mentioned 250mg per day but I missed the supplement. Can anyone here fill
    in the missing substance? Thanks in advance. (It was not turmeric)




    0
    1. Hi rhart
      I pulled out my trusty copy of How Not to Die and on Page 407 he starts with
      B12-2,500 Micrograms
      Vitamin D depending on where you live and how much sun you get
      iodine rich foods-Sea vegetables
      Algae long chain omega 3-250 mg

      Now there is a list somewhere on this website but I can’t find it.
      I hope that helps.
      Gale




      5
    2. rhart, don’t quote me on this, but maybe you could use it as a means to search further. I seem to recall seeing a lecture by Dr. Greger in which he stressed the importance of vegans consuming enough (and I think in something of a proper balance) of the various forms of omega 3’s.




      0
  20. Hi Friends,
    In Canada, I have bought the brand, Organic Traditions Amla Berry Powder. I just put some on my dhal and rice- delicious. Kinda sour to the taste, so watch for the pucker! ;)

    I just love how reading or watching any of the great information on Nutritionfacts.org can change my meal into a super-meal! Thanks Dr. Greger!

    A proud monthly supporter of Nutritionfacts.org




    4
    1. @Sandra– You mean Dr. Greger’s signature, cliff-hanger conclusion, “Which I’ll cover, next”?

      I fall for that every time– just as he reaches the logical conclusion, he applies a quick tourniquet of suspense.

      The information about Amla is truly amazing, provided test cohorts confirm the results in vivo.

      Once, I toyed with the idea of growing blueberries in my back yard, but the bushes are fairly expensive as a non-bearing investment for the first few seasons. Now, to look into Amla cultivation.




      5
      1. JANis, there are many different and unrelated fruits referred to as gooseberries. American goose berries, for instance, grows on a bush in the woods preferred by blueberries. (These gooseberries make the only pie I might prefer to a blueberry pie.) But they aren’t related to amla any more than the Chinese gooseberry which we call kiwi.




        0
      2. alphaa10 I have an amla seedling growing in a very large pot in my yard. If you find out any cultivation tips let us know! So far all I have been able to find out is that it will top kill with a modest freeze but come back in the spring. Maybe when older it will survive such a freeze. In any case it is an attractive plant so I’ll keep trying with it.




        1
  21. I live in Singapore, which has a thriving Indian community, so gooseberries are available, but not the powder. They are among the strongest bitter tasting elements on the planet too! I don’t have diabetes, but there may be room for debate on which is worse, the disease or the cure! Chinese bitter gourd is sweet by comparison! Any suggestions how to make them palatable without affecting the benefits? Otherwise, I’ll stick to tumeric for my antioxidants.




    0
    1. I have always had Amla in ice cold smoothies as the cold reduces flavors. My guess would be to freeze the berries and use them as ice in super thick smoothie with complementary ingredients. For me that means frozen banana and frozen broccoli with soy milk blended to the consistency of soft ice cream.




      3
    1. hi rhart, as far as I know, omega 3’s from algae IS pollutant free since the algae is grown in tanks, not in the ocean. It’a matter of finding the brand with the strength and price point that you want.




      3
    2. rhart – I purchase Spectrum vegan EPA + DHA. Here is a link so you can see what they look like:
      https://www.luckyvitamin.com/ph-663414-spectrum-essentials-vegan-ultra-omega-3-epa-dha-with-vitamin-d-lemon-flavored-60-softgels?LanguageCode=EN&locale=en-US&utm_source=google&utm_medium=PLA&scid=scplp140652&sc_intid=140652&utmp_campaign=SC_Shopping_Campaign_Mid_Margin&branded=no&gclid=Cj0KCQjw1dDPBRC_ARIsAJZrQfo16J6aRc9eBbmOLzQ50EhW7Isl4xkf2BZCG-GHezucVOFMw0HswV4aAj7OEALw_wcB&gclsrc=aw.ds

      I did not purchase mine from the above luckyvitamin seller. I bought mine at my local health food store. They were on sale at the time for $20 for 60 gels. But the amount in each gel was twice what Dr. G recommended. So I just take one every other day. So they last for 2 months. Not bad.
      As others have mentioned, they are grown in vats, not polluted ocean water.
      Hope this helps.




      1
    1. i also had that thought , are these results from typical diets that include meat and how much difference would it really make for someone on wfpb already?




      3
    2. Guiding Vegan,

      I think you might find this study of interest ….. comparing Amla to Simvastatin. As it is effective at lowering cholesterol.

      Should you eat cholesterol is a completely different question. I would encourage you to see the following videos as it appears fairly clear that extra cholesterol in most people’s diets is not a wise choice. https://nutritionfacts.org/video/how-do-we-know-that-cholesterol-causes-heart-disease/ and others that are at: https://nutritionfacts.org/?fwp_search=cholesterol&fwp_content_type=video

      Dr. Alan Kadish moderator for Dr. Greger http://www.CenterofHealth.com




      2
  22. Hi There

    I have an 11 year old daughter that we’re trying to “fatten” up as she is under weight (she has CP and some physical feeding issues). Do you have any recommendations on a plant based/whole food diet how to maximise calories to help her gain weight?

    Thank you
    Belinda




    0
    1. Hi, belinda kerr. I sympathize with your daughter, because I had the same problem when I was just a little bit older than she is. I think the best sources of information about healthy weight gain on a plant-based diet might be whole-food, plant-based bodybuilders. Google vegan bodybuilding if you are interested in finding them. I know one female vegan bodybuilder who has two children, and has successfully navigated pregnancies, breastfeeding and feeding two very healthy small children with whole plant foods. Smoothies and shakes can be a good way to get more calories into the body, and they can be made from cooked beans, veggies, and fruits. You can also throw some nuts and/or avocado in there for extra calories from healthy fat. I hope that helps!




      0
      1. Thanks Christine. that is so helpful thank you. I particularly like the idea about vegan bodybuilding as a resource – I hadn’t thought of that one!!




        0
  23. Back when the amla video came out as relates to diabetes, a friend of mine immediately bought some and began consuming it per the amounts that the research that Dr. G. used had shown. He had no effects from taking it for his diabetes.
    I am really looking forward to seeing if it does anything for cholesterol.

    If anyone has had any good results with amla for either diabetes or cholesterol I sure would like to hear from you! :-)
    Thanks




    1
  24. Hi,

    I would like to know if I can have in the morning amla powder with water and then in the afternoon matcha tea? There is a problem if I use both everyday or I should drink them in different days?




    0
  25. ha,ha,ha – Mr. Greger you are to late. I read your article and immediately look up at the internet for Amla powder in Germany – the profiteers has been faster then the science… again. In Germany you can buy 1.000 g powder for the bargain price of ???? Roll the drums….. 130 €, the cost of a half tea spoon (about 2 g) would be 2,60 €! Are they crazy? Unfortunatly there are less indian foot stores in Germany, where you may be can buy original Amla powder – but I life in the outback far away from the next big city…. :-(




    1
  26. Effects of soaking, germination and fermentation on phytic acid, total and in vitro soluble zinc in brown rice.
    (PMID:26047266)

    http://europepmc.org/abstract/med/26047266

    Oxalobacter formigenes May Reduce the Risk of Calcium Oxalate Kidney Stones
    (PMCID: PMC2396938)

    https://www.kitchenstewardship.com/phytic-acid-in-rice-reduced-96-with-accelerated-fermentation/

    My question is why these fermentation practices do not increase zinc absorption? It says something else (complexation) is inhibiting absorption? Perhaps it’s possible to make a culture/starter that can neutralise all the anti-nutrients in nuts, seeds, grains and beans?




    0
  27. Surprise surprise. Low cholesterol is associated with high rate of mortality in diseases including colon cancer, lung cancer, liver damage, heart diseases, dementia, other mental issues. They even recommend to monitor patients for their cholesterol that if it is too low to stop giving statin drug.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1644336?ordinalpos=1&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9840100?ordinalpos=7&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15006277?%3Cbr%20/%3Eordinalpos=1&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum ****

    low cholesterol was significantly associated with all-cause mortality, showing significant associations with death through cancer, liver diseases, and mental diseases. Triglycerides > 200 mg/dl had an effect in women 65 years and older but not in men.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12499611?dopt=AbstractPlus

    “The J-curve association was observed between average TC or LDL-C concentrations and total mortality. Malignancy was the most prevalent cause of death. The health of patients should be monitored closely when there is a remarkable decrease in TC and LDL-C concentrations with low-dose statin”

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11502313?ordinalpos=1&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum ****

    “Only the group with low cholesterol concentration at both examinations had a significant association with mortality (risk ratio 1.64, 95% CI 1.13-2.36). INTERPRETATION: We have been unable to explain our results. These data cast doubt on the scientific justification for lowering cholesterol to very low concentrations (<4.65 mmol/L, 181mg/dl) in elderly people"

    "Among 477 cancer deaths five years after cholesterol measurement, there was a significant excess of lung cancer deaths in the bottom 20% of the cholesterol distributions in the populations"

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2886765?ordinalpos=1&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum

    "The inverse cholesterol-cancer relation in men was present for cholesterol determinations made 6 or more years before diagnosis of cancer"

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6957662?ordinalpos=1&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum ****

    Serum cholesterol measured at baseline was found to be associated with the risk of both fatal cancer and all cancers occurring in the subsequent 18 years in men (P less than 0.05). This inverse association seems particularly strong for colon cancer in men.




    0
    1. Important: cholesterol of 181 seems to be the recommended lower limit.

      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11502313?ordinalpos=1&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum ****

      “Only the group with low cholesterol concentration at both examinations had a significant association with mortality (risk ratio 1.64, 95% CI 1.13-2.36). INTERPRETATION: We have been unable to explain our results. These data cast doubt on the scientific justification for lowering cholesterol to very low concentrations (<4.65 mmol/L, 181mg/dl) in elderly people"




      0
      1. The conclusions drawn from this study confuses correlation with causation.

        Cancer can lower LDL cholesterol by feeding on the cholesterol. Dr. Greger talks about this in his video “Cholesterol Feeds Breast Cancer Cells.”

        Also, alcoholics with liver cancer or cirrhosis of the liver can have very low serum cholesterol. At the hospital where I used to work, the lab results for these patients showed pathologically low cholesterol levels on the order of 40 to 50 mg/dL. This should not come as a surprise, as the liver is the organ that produces cholesterol, and a diseased organ will produce very little.

        It makes all the difference in the world WHY one’s cholesterol is low. Is it low because of a healthy diet and lifestyle, or is it low because one is suffering from a disease that either feeds on the cholesterol or damages the organ that produces it?




        6
        1. It is an association but a significant association that one has to think about. Like you said, a healthy body produces cholesterol and so you don’t just base blindly on a cholesterol measurement and say that it is too high and take statin or not eat certain healthy fat, or it is too low and now you are complacent that you are healthy when in fact you have inflammation all over the body. So right now, the low cholesterol is associated with high mortality and serious diseases whether from natural causation or from taking statin drug, I don’t know. Everybody know that association is not causation but it needs to be looked at, at least as a symptom.

          It’s just like plaque in people brain is associated with Alzheimer’s but removing the plaque does not cure Alzheimer’s but one should not ignore the plaque.

          It does not look like these people are taking statin drug but it is just low naturally.

          https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11502313?ordinalpos=1&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum ****

          “Only the group with low cholesterol concentration at both examinations had a significant association with mortality (risk ratio 1.64, 95% CI 1.13-2.36). INTERPRETATION: We have been unable to explain our results. These data cast doubt on the scientific justification for lowering cholesterol to very low concentrations (<4.65 mmol/L, 181mg/dl) in elderly people"




          0
        2. This systematic review found that elderly people in the lowest quartile of total and LDL cholesterol had a higher mortality rate than those with higher cholesterol. However, the authors of the review do acknowledge that this may be because serious illnesses can cause low cholesterol. Another cause of low cholesterol is the use of statin drugs.

          If low cholesterol as a result of eating a plant-based diet (and not as a result of taking statin drugs or having a serious illness such as cancer) were the true cause of increased mortality, we would observe a shortened lifespan in groups such as the Seventh Day Adventists. However, we observe the opposite: longevity in Seventh Day Adventists who have low cholesterol as a result of diet and lifestyle.

          To your health,

          Dr. Jamie Koonce




          4
    2. This is no surprise, Jerry. the association has been known since at least 1926, if not before. Illness and trauma cause cholesterol to decline not the other way around.

      But gee, Jerry, somehow in your post you just “forgot” to mention that disease and trauma cause cholesterol to decline. Just like you favourite internet marketer, Dr Hyman, “forgets” to mention this fact on his website. This is highly deceptive and I think unethical behaviour. Perhaps Hyman has the excuse of ignorance, you certainly don’t – the facts have been brought to your attention multiple times.

      After all, it has been known for almost 100 years that low cholesterol is associated with disease. We also know that , and other trauma causes cholesterol to decline and the more severe the illness or injury, the greater the decline.
      http://www.criticalcare.theclinics.com/article/S0749-0704(05)00097-7/abstract

      Even minor illnesses cause cholesterol to decline
      http://paperity.org/p/58129810/reduced-cholesterol-is-associated-with-recent-minor-illness-the-cardia-study

      The more severe the illness and longer the hospitalisation, the greater the decline in cholesterol, For example, in heart attacks (myocardial infractions or MIs)
      “Of 67 acute MI patients, 30 were admitted for ST elevation MI (STEMI) and 37 for non-STEMI. Both total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels decreased significantly (by 9%) in the 24 hours after admission and by 13% and 17% respectively on day 4@
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26233997

      and in cancer the association between low cholesterol pre-diagnosis and subsequent diagnosis of cancer is also probably “attributable to reverse causation due to preclinical malignancies.”
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2685450/

      Yet here you are again trying to deceive people into thinking that low cholesterol increases risk of illness and death when declining cholesterol is a marker of disease and injury. This is an attempt to mislead people through omission of key information. You should be ashamed of yourself Jerry.




      6
      1. Ditto to Scott B’s comment about TG:

        “@TG you have the patience of a saint sir. Jerry’s constant ignorant posts are so tiresome and you are really helping the comments section with your replies, so that people unaware of this persons agenda and false info will be better informed. Thank you Tom.”

        Omission of pertinent facts is very deceptive!!!




        2
    1. South African Cape gooseberries: Physalis peruviana
      Indian gooseberries: Phyllanthus emblica
      –> very different fruits (as you also can see when you google pictures of the fruits), so small chance of the effect being the same.




      0
  28. I have started following this site a few months ago and iit seems amla and tryphala are the real superfoods. I thought of buying some. Mountain Rose Herbs is out of stock; Anthony’s Goods only sells ice cream and the MIPA site only sells supplements, not the amla powder. I checked Amazon and some reviews of the organic amla sold there were scary: from live bugs in the package to plastic taste on the product to “funny color and taste”. OMG! I am not sure we can trust any of those brands. Does anyone know of a reputable brand?

    I suppose it is too expensive to have products tested and I could certainly not afford it. My suggestion would be we would all contribute so NutritionFacts would select a few brands of tryphala and amla for toxicity. The same should work for other herbs that come along and nobody knows they are what the label says.

    I am not sure it is at all feasible or affordable (how many subscribers are there?); it is just a suggestion.




    0
  29. Hi,

    I see the data that shows the efficacy of the powder, but to recommend consumption of it you need to have substantial data that long term it’s not harmful, don’t you? In Yuroveda this is considered medicinal and is used in special situations following appropriate diagnosis; inspite of knowing it’s power to achieve some unique benefits they do not recommend the powder on a regular basis. Perhaps the fruit. So, what is the science behind the recommendation (in other videos) to consume daily?




    1
  30. Does it make a difference whether the amla is uncooked or added to food in the process of cooking? Will heat destroy or reduce its antioxidant and cholesterol lowering benefits?




    0
  31. Dear Dr. Greger, and all the staff at Nutrition Facts,

    I would like to ask if you know of any research relating to diet and achalasia? Or possibly statin drugs and achalasia?

    From what I have learned, achalasia is an auto immune disorder that may be triggered by a viral infection, which ultimately results in one not being able to eat.

    I have a family member who is suffering from achalasia, and I am concerned that current medical practices do nothing to address the underlying cause of the disease. They already follow a plant based diet, but as I’ve learned the hard way, its possible to eat plant based, and still not be eating for optimal health.

    As achalasia may be an autoimmune disease, I am hopeful that diet may at least offer the possibility of mitigating the condition.

    Thank your for taking the time to read this,

    Thanks,

    Mark

    ——————

    Here is the citation for the research paper I’ve been able read and understand about the disease:

    Furuzawa-Carballeda, Janette et al. “New Insights into the Pathophysiology of Achalasia and Implications for Future Treatment.” World Journal of Gastroenterology 22.35 (2016): 7892–7907. PMC. Web. 30 Oct. 2017.




    0
  32. I think it great to know of another fruit that high in antioxidant power and helpful in “reversing diabetes’. But I believed it best NOT to focus on ONE particular food that the Silver bullet like they say. I understand the optimum thing for health is health of the microbiome and the best diet is a Diverse diet for diversification of bacteria species……like the way life is on Earth, and not MONO-culture; “man’s way”. I had a blueberry smoothie everyday for the last 14 years now as part of my vegan diet. Wouldn’t give it up although it may not have the highest antioxidant value.




    0
  33. I add a level teaspoon of amla to my morning smoothie, but am interested in measuring amla by the gram. So I don’t have to buy a scale, can anyone tell me how many teaspoons of amla powder make up one gram?




    0
  34. Thanks Dr. Greger for bringing it back home. Great topic and great video. It’s good to have videos back on the nutrition frontline.




    0
  35. Hi, Ellen Rozics. We are not in the habit of endorsing specific products on NutritionFacts. You should check with producers to find out what their quality control practices are, including whether or not they test products for contaminants, and then publish the results of the tests. This should help you find the best sources. I hope that helps!




    0
  36. Hello, I would like to know if these LDL lowering gooseberries are sufficient true for the disease familial hypercholesterolemia Frederikson type 2.
    If so, would you recommend Amla as a replacement for statins?




    0
    1. Hi, R V. I am not a doctor, and so I cannot recommend discontinuing any medication that has been prescribed for you. If you are able to reduce cholesterol levels through diet, it would stand to reason that you could discuss discontinuing medication with your doctor. You could certainly try the amla and see if it lowers your cholesterol, and then talk with your doctor. I hope that helps!




      0
  37. I noticed that there are two different types of Amla referenced in the video: Emblica Oficinalis and Phyllanthus emblica. what is the difference? Will the results be the same with either product? What is the types sold to consumers?




    0
  38. Thank you for your question. Most of the studies reported in Dr Greger’s videos refer to Amla powder and the effects on health parameters appear to be beneficial. Therefore, using Amla powder is fine as it is the formulation that has been most widely studied




    0

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