Best Supplements for Prostate Cancer

Best Supplements for Prostate Cancer
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What would happen if you secretly gave cancer patients four of the healthiest foods?

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

In my video on pomegranates and prostate cancer, pomegranate pills appeared useless in the treatment for prostate cancer. And, the same disappointing results with a “pomegranate beverage”—but that was just a “pomegranate extract” as well. So, maybe the “pomegranate [itself] cannot be blamed for the ineffectiveness seen in the study…but [rather] the low dose of the pomegranate active principle[s in the extract].” But what is the active principle? Extracts will boast about the level of ellagic acid—”[d]efinitely…one of the [more] potent of the phytochemicals found in pomegranate. However, it is not as strong as [the] pomegranate [itself].”

What they mean is that the components may act synergistically; the whole may be greater than the sum of its parts. Here are human prostate cancer cells in a petri dish, churning away at 100% growth. But drip on this pomegranate fraction and the cancer growth rate is cut 30%. But, this other fraction appeared useless. So, if you add them both together, what do you think would happen? 30% suppression plus zero suppression equals 70% suppression! That’s synergy, where 1 + 1 is greater than 2. Here they are under a microscope—that’s what prostate cancer cells look like. Here’s with the 30% compound. Here’s with the useless one, and here’s with both.

So, “[a]ny attempt to characterize the…power of a medicinal food by standardizing a single chemical is missing the entire point of [plant-based] medicine.” So, the standardized extracts “represent[s] a cynical, [money]-driven attempt to replace the power of the pomegranate with the power of ellagic acid.” But, “[t]he pomegranate needs no such tricks or enhancements.” It’s powerful as is. So, why don’t they just try the fruit out on cancer patients?

Because you can’t stuff a pomegranate in a pill. So, you can’t compare it to an indistinguishable sugar-pill placebo. Drugs are easy to study; people don’t know if they’re taking the active drug or the placebo. But they tend to notice if they’re eating a pomegranate or not. So, if you gave a bunch of cancer patients some pomegranates to eat, and the cancer slowed down, you wouldn’t know if it was the pomegranates or just the placebo effect. Of course, the patients wouldn’t care—if they got better, who cares? But to change medical practice, we want to know if the fruit is actually something special. I suppose you could create some kind of pomegranate smoothie versus some fake smoothie, but that sounds logistically difficult. So, researchers tried powdering it. 199 men with prostate cancer either got a placebo or a tablet, three times a day, containing 100mg of whole powdered pomegranate. Now, this was the whole fruit, just with the water taken out. But even so, how much can you fit in a tablet? Comes out to be about six pomegranate seeds’ worth a day. That’s about 1/100 of a pomegranate a day!

Since they could fit so little in a pill, they tried to maximize their chances of beating back the cancer using diversity. If you have two groups of people eating approximately the same amount of fruits and vegetables, but one group ate a relatively low biological diversity diet, where they ate tons of really healthy foods, but just less variety than smaller servings of a high-diversity diet, which group would win in terms of protecting their DNA from free radical damage? The high-diversity group. This suggests that “smaller amounts of many phytochemicals may have a greater potential to exert beneficial effects than larger amounts of fewer phytochemicals.”

Same result for inflammation. Greater variety in fruit and vegetable intake is associated with lower inflammation, even if you eat the same number of servings. Same with improving cognitive function. “[G]reater variety in fruit and vegetable intake was associated with a better [mental status], executive function, attention, [and] memory function [in some cases]—even after adjustment for total quantity.”

So, if you have two people eating the same number of servings of healthy foods, the one eating a greater variety may do better. So, the researchers didn’t just put in some pomegranate powder, they added some powdered broccoli too, and some powdered turmeric, and some powdered green tea concentrate. So, a fruit, a vegetable, spice and leaf, but tiny amounts—that’s like one floret of broccoli a day, less than an eighth-teaspoon a day of turmeric, and about one-sixth of a tea bag worth of green tea. All great plants, but could such tiny amounts actually affect the progression of cancer?

Yes. In the group of men with early-stage prostate cancer trying to avoid surgery, the PSA levels rose in the placebo group; rose nearly 50%—indicating the cancer continued to flourish, whereas in the pomegranate/broccoli/turmeric/green tea Food Supplement group, the PSAs didn’t rise at all. And, in those with more advanced disease—already had surgery or radiation, and trying to avoid chemo—a 70% greater rise in the placebo group. That was enough to significantly delay some of the more toxic treatment. So, significant short-term, favorable effects—see, they only had enough money to run the study for six months, because it was a non-commercial endeavor, funded by charity. This wasn’t some supplement company—in fact, there was no supplement until the investigators dreamed it up from scratch.

Of course, now there’s a supplement, given the study’s extraordinary results, but the only reason the researchers put the foods in pill form was to match it with a placebo. In my mind, what this study should tell cancer patients is to eat curried broccoli with fruit for dessert, and sip some green tea. A completely plant-based diet may even shrink the tumor, not just slow it down. But there’s no reason we can’t do both, a plant-based diet chock-full of especially powerful plants.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Icons created by Jamison Wieser, Tu Uyen, Arthur Shlain, Laymik, iconsphere, Yazmin Alanis, Nikita Kozin, and Tomas Knopp from the Noun Project.

Image credit: Anyka via 123RF. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

In my video on pomegranates and prostate cancer, pomegranate pills appeared useless in the treatment for prostate cancer. And, the same disappointing results with a “pomegranate beverage”—but that was just a “pomegranate extract” as well. So, maybe the “pomegranate [itself] cannot be blamed for the ineffectiveness seen in the study…but [rather] the low dose of the pomegranate active principle[s in the extract].” But what is the active principle? Extracts will boast about the level of ellagic acid—”[d]efinitely…one of the [more] potent of the phytochemicals found in pomegranate. However, it is not as strong as [the] pomegranate [itself].”

What they mean is that the components may act synergistically; the whole may be greater than the sum of its parts. Here are human prostate cancer cells in a petri dish, churning away at 100% growth. But drip on this pomegranate fraction and the cancer growth rate is cut 30%. But, this other fraction appeared useless. So, if you add them both together, what do you think would happen? 30% suppression plus zero suppression equals 70% suppression! That’s synergy, where 1 + 1 is greater than 2. Here they are under a microscope—that’s what prostate cancer cells look like. Here’s with the 30% compound. Here’s with the useless one, and here’s with both.

So, “[a]ny attempt to characterize the…power of a medicinal food by standardizing a single chemical is missing the entire point of [plant-based] medicine.” So, the standardized extracts “represent[s] a cynical, [money]-driven attempt to replace the power of the pomegranate with the power of ellagic acid.” But, “[t]he pomegranate needs no such tricks or enhancements.” It’s powerful as is. So, why don’t they just try the fruit out on cancer patients?

Because you can’t stuff a pomegranate in a pill. So, you can’t compare it to an indistinguishable sugar-pill placebo. Drugs are easy to study; people don’t know if they’re taking the active drug or the placebo. But they tend to notice if they’re eating a pomegranate or not. So, if you gave a bunch of cancer patients some pomegranates to eat, and the cancer slowed down, you wouldn’t know if it was the pomegranates or just the placebo effect. Of course, the patients wouldn’t care—if they got better, who cares? But to change medical practice, we want to know if the fruit is actually something special. I suppose you could create some kind of pomegranate smoothie versus some fake smoothie, but that sounds logistically difficult. So, researchers tried powdering it. 199 men with prostate cancer either got a placebo or a tablet, three times a day, containing 100mg of whole powdered pomegranate. Now, this was the whole fruit, just with the water taken out. But even so, how much can you fit in a tablet? Comes out to be about six pomegranate seeds’ worth a day. That’s about 1/100 of a pomegranate a day!

Since they could fit so little in a pill, they tried to maximize their chances of beating back the cancer using diversity. If you have two groups of people eating approximately the same amount of fruits and vegetables, but one group ate a relatively low biological diversity diet, where they ate tons of really healthy foods, but just less variety than smaller servings of a high-diversity diet, which group would win in terms of protecting their DNA from free radical damage? The high-diversity group. This suggests that “smaller amounts of many phytochemicals may have a greater potential to exert beneficial effects than larger amounts of fewer phytochemicals.”

Same result for inflammation. Greater variety in fruit and vegetable intake is associated with lower inflammation, even if you eat the same number of servings. Same with improving cognitive function. “[G]reater variety in fruit and vegetable intake was associated with a better [mental status], executive function, attention, [and] memory function [in some cases]—even after adjustment for total quantity.”

So, if you have two people eating the same number of servings of healthy foods, the one eating a greater variety may do better. So, the researchers didn’t just put in some pomegranate powder, they added some powdered broccoli too, and some powdered turmeric, and some powdered green tea concentrate. So, a fruit, a vegetable, spice and leaf, but tiny amounts—that’s like one floret of broccoli a day, less than an eighth-teaspoon a day of turmeric, and about one-sixth of a tea bag worth of green tea. All great plants, but could such tiny amounts actually affect the progression of cancer?

Yes. In the group of men with early-stage prostate cancer trying to avoid surgery, the PSA levels rose in the placebo group; rose nearly 50%—indicating the cancer continued to flourish, whereas in the pomegranate/broccoli/turmeric/green tea Food Supplement group, the PSAs didn’t rise at all. And, in those with more advanced disease—already had surgery or radiation, and trying to avoid chemo—a 70% greater rise in the placebo group. That was enough to significantly delay some of the more toxic treatment. So, significant short-term, favorable effects—see, they only had enough money to run the study for six months, because it was a non-commercial endeavor, funded by charity. This wasn’t some supplement company—in fact, there was no supplement until the investigators dreamed it up from scratch.

Of course, now there’s a supplement, given the study’s extraordinary results, but the only reason the researchers put the foods in pill form was to match it with a placebo. In my mind, what this study should tell cancer patients is to eat curried broccoli with fruit for dessert, and sip some green tea. A completely plant-based diet may even shrink the tumor, not just slow it down. But there’s no reason we can’t do both, a plant-based diet chock-full of especially powerful plants.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Icons created by Jamison Wieser, Tu Uyen, Arthur Shlain, Laymik, iconsphere, Yazmin Alanis, Nikita Kozin, and Tomas Knopp from the Noun Project.

Image credit: Anyka via 123RF. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Doctor's Note

I love that study! You and I both know why those studies aren’t performed more often. Who’s going to profit? (Other than, of course, the millions of people suffering and dying from cancer.)

The pomegranate extract video I opened with can be found here: Pomegranate vs. Placebo for Prostate Cancer. And the note I ended on, the landmark Ornish study, is detailed here: Cancer Reversal through Diet. For those unwilling or unable to make such significant dietary changes, there’s still something you can do. See Prostate Cancer Survival: The A/V Ratio. Changing a Man’s Diet after a Prostate Cancer Diagnosis isn’t easy!

For more on the 2 + 2 > 4 concept, see Food Synergy.

What about preventing prostate cancer in the first place? You can check out videos like Prostate Cancer & Organic Milk vs. Almond Milk and Eggs, Choline, & Cancer to get a sense of what you might want to avoid. But in terms of what to eat, I’ve got two videos coming up soon: The Role of Soy Foods in Prostate Cancer Prevention and Fermented or Unfermented Soy Foods for Prostate Cancer Prevention? But first, a video series on the heavy metal lead, up next.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

105 responses to “Best Supplements for Prostate Cancer

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  1. This synergy concept raises an interesting question. Since, for instance, ellagic acid is agreed to be the most powerful component of the pomegranate, what if a person took the ellagic extract pill at the same time as eating the full pomegranate. Would that increase the effectiveness of the whole fruit? Similarly with turmeric and curcumin. Since curcumin is agreed to be the most powerful component of turmeric, would taking a curcumin supplement along with eating whole turmeric boost the effectiveness of eating just the turmeric alone? Or does the extra single ingredient detract from the effectiveness? Could it be that the proportions found in nature are the optimum for human health and anything we do to change that proportion detracts from the effectiveness? Are there any studies along these lines? Any opinions from the experts?




    24
    1. WFPB-HAL raises some interesting questions , one thing we need more of is non profit org. to do more studies like that .




      11
    2. The twin concepts of synergy and potentiation are well known among metallurgists, and I’ve found them useful to think with generally, so no surprise that they prove useful in biology and medicine. Bucky Fuller was a fan of synergy, in which combined substances exhibit more than the sum of their effects, as with chrome nickel steel.
      Potentiation occurs when a substance without notable effect improves behavior of a positive substance, as when black pepper greatly improves turmeric absorption (though, since it seems also to potentiate other substances, a more subtle concept may be needed.
      As for Hal’s query whether evolution has pre-optimized combinations of positive and potentiating substances, a similar speculation is rife among permaculturists, whether ‘nature’ has already maximized productive potential and the best humans can do is imitate nature, rather than seek the elusive ‘miracle’ food (GMO-made) and production method.
      I think the power of evolution is not recognized, nor is the power of evolutionary computing, which allows AIs to iterate successive solutions to posed problems until, after millions of tries, one or a few emerge as best. Pitting evolution-so-far against AI-evolution seems a viable way to test the notion.
      Applied to this study, which found an effect from maximizing plant families, we can imagine studies pitting ‘best’ members of a family against random samples, seeking whether there are in-family optimal members or whether variety of both families AND members is the spice of life.
      Among crucifers, broccoli (and a few varieties) stands out for sulforaphane; garlic, leeks, and red onions are notable Alliums [not strictly lilies but very close] for cancers, and cherry tomatoes and peppers stand out among Solanum members in overall nutrition, lycopene, and small presence of nicotine.
      Any others you can suggest?




      13
      1. This was a great video. Autumn olive, though invasive back East, is an extemely nutritious nitrogen fixing bush, which has by some accounts 7-17 times more lycopene than tomatoes. Smells better and attracts more hummingbirds as well. It is a very beautiful berry. If you live where it is invasive, gather it.




        5
        1. John, how do you eat it and what parts of the plant are edible? do you want to grow it or is it just too invasive.
          Can you harvest enough of the bush to keep it cut back? Since we do not use anything to control its spreading, can it be managed simply by harvesting, to eat for family and friends?




          0
          1. Once you learn to identify it, you can see autumn olive bushes everywhere. (at least in New England) Look for a tall bush with simple leaves that are silver on the bottom and green on top. The berries show up in the fall, and take a while to ripen fully. I’ve harvested the berries, but they have a rather large seed to pulp ratio. I’ve been told that the seeds are edible, so I just eat them whole. The fruit quality varies dramatically, I’ve had some berries that were almost inedible, and some that were pretty tasty. I’m sure you could grow the plant if you wanted to, trimming it if it spreads too far. I doubt that harvesting alone would be enough to control its spreading, it’s very hardy and very prolific.




            0
      2. For phytonutrients and other compounds in plants that fight cancer, especially hormone-dependent cancers, I would add:

        flavonols, especially myricetin (walnuts, parsley, many berries–sources listed here) and fisetin (organic strawberries, apple peels) and quercetin (with lots of sources, including the mighty Italian triumverate, all listed here).

        flavones luteolin and apigenin (parsley, chamomile, celery leaves and flakes, dried Mexican oregano)

        indoles in crucifers: watercress (raw only), Brussels sprouts, broccoli, cauliflower, kale, cabbage

        resveratrol: Vaccinium berries, including cranberries, skins of dark grapes and of pistachios (Resveratrol increases sex hormone binding globulin.)

        flax: increases SHBG

        melatonin: raspberries, gojis See Dr. Greger here.

        conjugated linoleic acid (a type of fat, not a phytonutrient): white button mushrooms (Clean out gills and eat raw or lightly cooked.)




        0
    3. WFPB-Hal – You might be right that spiking a whole food with additional amounts of an identified active ingredient might boost the effectiveness compared to a simple combination of the effectiveness of the whole food or the extract by itself. But it could just as easily go the other way with the combined effectiveness being less. Take an example from music. You have an orchestra with many different instruments with varying number of each type. As you listen you identify that the violins are the most important instrument in the orchestra, with more violins than any other instrument and the instrument that plays for the greatest percentage of the time. And the oboe is one of the least important by this measure since there is usually only one or two and it seldom plays the primary role. But tripling the number of violins is likely to not make Mozart’s Oboe Concerto sound better since even playing softly 60 violins will swamp the gentle sounds of the single oboe rather than providing just the proper lush rich background of sound.




      6
    4. This whole concept of the whole food vs an extract is similar to Bruce Ames triage theory? Also similar in the idea of eating a large variety of foods?

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wrfxdtXjXHs&feature=youtu.be&list=UUWF8SqJVNlx-ctXbLswcTcA

      In this video Dr. Rhonda Patrick interviews Dr. Bruce Ames about his triage theory, which he proposes that the body has developed a rationing response to shortages of micronutrients (vitamins and minerals) throughout evolution. When cells run out of a vitamin or mineral, that scarce micronutrient is allotted to proteins (in the body) essential for short-term survival. Proteins needed for long-term health, including those that protect DNA, lose out and become disabled and lead to diseases of aging. In addition they discuss how RDAs are chosen and what Bruce calls “longevity vitamins” which he calls a class of nutrients that exist mostly to prevent degenerative diseases of aging in addition to essential vitamins and minerals.

      …..

      I take a large variety of supplements…usually trying to stay with whole food concentrated powders…when I can.




      1
      1. Dr. Rhonda Patrick has interesting work but Bruce Ames is a supplement producer… He also recommends eating fish and his anti-aging product line includes 1 gram carnitine. I would not be so fast as to follow up on his advice.




        4
    5. I wonder is it true that ellagic acid is truly the most powerful component of the pomegranate? For example, in nature in 2016 (Ryu et al) it was published that urolithin A which would have been an alternative decomposition product to ellagic acid from precursors in pomegrante is actually incredibly potent in terms of its effect on cell health. In rats, they were able to extend lifespan by 45%, which is pretty remarkable. In that study it seemed that urolithin a was causing mitophagy of the less functional mitochondria, which may have indicated that ROS produced by mitochondria which are known to affect telomere length, was being restricted, therefore slowing aging. On the other hand, no effect of ellagic acid was found. While its clear that synergy can be an important factor, as was shown for at least two components in this video, I wonder also if sometimes a lack of an effect of a specific compound may also just reflect a misunderstanding of what key chemicals are involved in the process? I’m by no means in the nutrition field, just an interested observer.




      2
      1. The most powerful component is the pomegranate itself as a whole fruit with it’s synergetic interactions left intact. It is not the ellagic acid.




        4
        1. What is your view on vegetable/fruit supplements? I mean, do you think any of that synergistic effect if compromised by dehydrating to a powder or pill like was done in the study discussed in this video? I wonder because if not, and given the synergistic effects when combining multiple fruit/veggies, it seems like a wider cross section of phytochemicals could be achieved by a vegetable/fruit supplement.




          1
          1. Hi Ryan,

            I am a volunteer for Dr. Greger. You pose an excellent question. If the pill used in the study presented in this video worked, why not use it in every day life? But why not eat higher amounts of all of the foods? Eat a whole pomegranate, a cup or 2 of broccoli, etc.? In other words, why not get larger doses of a large diversity of plant-foods. That’s the best of both worlds.




            3
            1. A valid point, but is it possible to eat 40-50 different kinds of vegetable/fruit per day? I suspect most people may only eat a handful of different vegetables and different fruit each day. Would it be beneficial for most people to actually take a vegetable/fruit supplement which has a large diversity of plant-foods, on top of a primary plant based diet? Or perhaps as a supplement when doing caloric restriction? What are your thoughts?




              3
              1. IF…you could find a well made fruit/veggie whole food powdered supplement…I’d go with it. But you’d want a variety of whole food powders…and they’d need to be tested for heavy metals…etc. The process of drying them would need to not alter their components to too great a degree.

                There is a great variety of these kinds of powders…like most things you can’t cheap out on it…but a high price is no guarantee of quality.




                0
            2. Ummm…because in my part of the world I do not have access to some of the fruit and veggies. And then we travel into the mountains and other islands where they have very little soil and often go 4-6 months of the year bringing in water from another island. (Busuanga, Philippines for example) Having whole food capsules or tablets can be useful.




              1
  2. As a male in my mid 50’s I have had the usual PSA tests. About 6 years ago my PSA level started elevating. It had gotten up to an 8 and since then I’ve had two biopsies. I was told that I could wait until I was in my 80’s to do something about it but the doctor (urologist) said since I was so young he advised I go and meet with their medical counceler/advisor to review my options of treatment.. No one ever mentioned anything about diet or stress. I considered this diagnosis to be a wake up call for me about the stress levels in my life and reassessing my self care. I started doing research on line and came across nutritionfacts.org. This information has been so very helpful. I changed my work schedule to allow proper time for lunch and less overtime and occassional walks (incorporating more moderate exercise) and adopted a whole foods plant based diet (no eggs, cheese/milk, meat) added a lot more greens foods to my diet, fruits, nuts and seeds, whole grains and a daily dose of ground flax seeds. After 8 months of being on this new regime I asked my regular doctor (nurse practicioner) to do a PSA test and was happy to find that it went down from an 8 to a 3. So now it has been about a year since I have made these changes and looking forward to having my next doctors visit and having my PSA test done. I asked my doctor why they don’t recommend dietary changes for prostate cancer patients because they recommend dietary changes to patients for other conditions such as high blood pressure and diabetes, ex. She replied that some people have had results by adopting changes to their diet. I’m thankful to having found nutritionfacts.org and for Dr. Gregers dedication and for getting this information out there for us.




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    1. This is a great story James about changing your eating habit and life style and all from learning from Dr Greger and co workers on this website. Well done and keep up the good work.




      5
    2. Congratulations James and never stop or give up on your Plant Based Diet and low stress lifestyle.

      My story is similar and PSA level went way down after 3 months on Plant Based Diet.

      Thank you Dr. Ornish, Dr. Esselstyn, Dr. Campbell and Dr. Gerson who are true healers




      0
      1. I’m so glad this has worked for you too, Ron.  These doctors truly are healers and have given us much to be thankful for.  James




        0
  3. This is why I love eating at a really good salad bar. There are always a great diversity of fruit, vegetables, beans, nuts, seeds and starches and some balsamic vinegar to top it all off with. It’s more diversity and variety than I usually get at home, and I love the interplay of sweet and savory combinations that can be created.

    I just got back from two weeks in central Europe where it can be quite the challenge to get high antioxidant whole food vegan meals especially when dining out with co-workers, and I returned home with a raging sinus and upper respiratory infections. I didn’t want to clobber my gut micro-biome with antibiotics so I when I got home, I made lots of fruit salads with lots of berries and flax seeds and slathered them with lots of freshly squeezed lemon juice with fresh ginger and green tea infusions. That diet along with as much sleep as I my body requested completely cleared my symptoms by the third day following my return.

    Food is powerful medicine. I was able to treat my maladies without degrading intestinal gut flora.
    Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food!




    25
    1. Joe, That’s a powerful story of how to treat illnesses like colds, flu, sinus infections, etc. People often come home from travels only to catch something – a cold, flu, etc. It would be interesting to know if others on the trip had infections after getting home and how quickly they got better doing whatever they did.

      You’re wise not to mess up your microbiome with antibiotics. Following surgery last fall there was concern that one of the incisions was slower in healing and could be infected, so the doctor ordered antibiotics. I resisted taking them for a week, but finally agreed to do so. My microbiome is still not what it was before the antibiotics, as evidenced by bowel habits and gas. My diet never changed, other than to eat only fruits and veggies for a few days before the surgery and only liquids (homemade juices, teas, and vegetable broth) for a few days after getting home from the hospital overnight stay.

      We’re going to Germany (where my son is being married!), Austria, and England this summer, and I’ve been concerned about how to eat well in the land of sausages. If anybody has any suggestions, please let me know.




      6
        1. Understood Jerry, There are plenty of options for an individual or a group of like minded diners, but my colleague did not want go shopping at those markets, prepare the food and conduct our dinner meetings in my hotel room.

          Sometimes one must find the best option available at a traditional German restaurant because that’s where everyone else wants to eat. There were few vegan options on offer at the places that were being selected. I like red cabbage, white asparagus, potatoes and bread, but after four days in a row, it gets old.




          0
      1. Hi Rebecca, am living in Austria (Vienna) and will have a 4 day trip to Hamburg (Germany) on the 19th.

        I will visit a friend so the cooking is not such a problem, hopefully, i still have to tell my friends about my relatively new eating Habits ;)
        And will introduce them to nutritionfacts.org while I can push them down and make em watch. A friend has to do what a friend has to do for one another right :)

        In both Austria and Germany you can get everything you need for a balanced vegan diet in pretty much any of the bigger food stores.
        I cannot give you a tipp on restaurants since you did not tell me what city(s) you will visit. But google is strong in both country’s you can find everything in your vicinity easily.

        I hope that eases you up a bit, no need what so ever to eat sausages :) – If you have anything specific you would like to know where you can find it, I’ll be glad do help out.

        Greetings, T




        3
        1. Tahnour,

          Thank you for your kind reply. I’m happy to hear what you’re saying, but we will be eating most of our meals in restaurants. Perhaps those stores have delis where can buy healthy foods for some of the meals.

          We will be in Bamberg for the first few days, with my son and his fiancee.

          Next we travel to Scheyern, where the wedding takes place.

          Then we go to Munich and meet a tour for eight days of travel across eastern Bavaria and into Austria, to a lake (I forget the name), then Salzburg.

          We go on to Vienna and spend a couple of days. Then we return to Salzburg for our flight to London.

          If you know of any appropriate restaurants in any of these places I’d love to know about them.

          Let me suggest something for you, before you attack your good friends with your new eating scheme. People are usually resistant to such ideas, so a more subtle approach may work better. If you will go to the site, esteemdynamics.org, you will find several videos talking about our resistance and how to talk with others about our diet. This is the site of Dr Doug Lisle, a PhD in psychology. He is both informative and very funny, so you’ll enjoy his talks.

          Good luck with your project.

          Thanks again for your information.




          0
      2. Rebecca, you should not at all be worried about finding good food in the land of sausages. In fact, the vegetarian soy sausage was invented in 1918 by German Chancellor Konrad Adenauer. Hundreds of thousands were killed at the battlefields by his cannons one century ago, but hundreds of millions might be saved by eating his sausages in our time.

        As I happen to live in The Netherlands, I often visit Germany or the UK. Vegans are very common especially in Germany. Many restaurants or falafel bars offer delicious and cheap vegan menus. Every kebab fast-food restaurant serves falafel wraps or falafel plates as well. The cost is usually very low like 4 Euro for a wrap filled with fresh veggies or 7 Euro for a plate with 4 or 5 kinds of different salads, several falafel balls, hummus, dressings and spices as you like. Oftentimes I order one plate like that to share with my wife. We like a cup of strong turkish tea with added fresh mint alongside.

        In the UK look for Indian restaurants. It seems that the best cooks left India to settle in the UK. Tell the waiter you are vegan and you’ll enjoy the taste of the inventors of turmeric. The spinach with potatoes are like heaven and the lentil curry might even be better.

        Supermarkets are fantastic and some even are completely organic. They are easy to spot everywhere. You will find many ready to use salads like quinoa with nuts, raw veggies and beans or bulgur with sweet pepper, onion and whatever. They come with a fresh organic dressing inside. Vegan burgers (based on any kind of starch, nuts and vegetables, even spirulina burgers) are sold at virtually every corner.

        If you need to find a decent veggie restaurant near to your location, check the HappyCow app or website.

        Enjoy your european tour!




        6
        1. Hans Ligtvoit, MD,

          Wow! Thank you! I’m so pleased and relieved to hear about all the great ways to eat healthy foods in Germany and England. We’ll be in several places, so now I know what to look for wherever we go. And I’ll check out Happy Cow as well. I have used it before, but didn’t realize it covered restaurants in Europe as well as the USA.




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      3. It was cold, rainy and it even snowed enough to blanket the ground on one Friday morning, and we were not properly attired for the the weather. I know of two of colleague that came down with colds.

        About twenty years ago, I had six courses of antibiotics in a one year period, and my doctor, who had prescribed them, told me that I should consider exploring alternatives because it wasn’t good to rely so heavily on antibiotics. I taken that advice to heart, and I have employed diet, rest and lifestyle modifications as a first line defense to address illnesses with better resulting overall health. That is not to say that I have completely avoided antibiotics. I had a course in preparation for oral surgery two years ago on advice my physician, but they are few and far in between.

        There are vegan restaurants to be found in Europe, and when I was on my own, I would frequent them, but I found it more of a challenge to find vegan options at German beer garden type restaurants that my colleague wanted to visit so I was stuck eating a lot of red cabbage and potatoes cooked in oil which I never use at home with bread.

        You will fare a lot better if you are traveling with like minded company.
        Enjoy you son’s wedding Rebecca!




        1
        1. Thank you Joe. I’m so glad you have found a better solution to your health – a solution that works for everybody who uses it.




          0
      4. Rebecca,

        Try to spend some time in Berlin, which has a vegan area centred on Schivelbeiner Strasse. As we know from Dr. Greger, vegan is not necessarily synonymous with healthy, but there is often considerable overlap. Veganz, a large and totally vegan supermarket, would be great to check out.




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        1. Maureen,

          Thanks for your reply. Sorry to say we won’t have time for Berlin. Maybe another time. My son is being married near Munich, and from there we’ll travel through Bavaria and on to Vienna before heading for London, then a week later, home.




          0
      5. It’s flying in the plane that makes people sick. Sitting in a seat where someone before you may have been sick. Touching the armrests, seat backs, tray’s, using the bathroom door handles, sink noobs. Then you put your finger in around your mouth, touching the food you eat, breathing the recycled air on a plane. It’s a no brainer!




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    2. Great example of the power of plants and yet most doctors won’t at least try a plant based diet as their first line of attack, mainly because they don’t think it works in all cases or that people will follow it. But so what! It is basically side-effect free, well at least bad side-effects, there are a ton of good side-effects. As such there is very little harm other than a short delay in trying other treatments. Boggles my mind that “prescribing” a WFPB diet isn’t what every doctor does first for a wide range of conditions and diseases. I would love to see the following scene play out multiple times a day in doctors offices around the world.

      “Mr. Smith, I have the results of your tests. Your blood pressure, while not dangerously high, is elevated well above optimal as is your insulin resistance, cholesterol level and weight. Fortunately we have caught this early and I am absolutely confident that if we can bring these levels down to optimum levels we can drastically slash your risks of developing diseases like heart disease, diabetes, stroke, cancer, and a number of others that will cut years off of your life and life from your years. To help you nip these worrisome conditions in the bud I am writing you a prescription for a Whole Food Plant Based diet. I know that prescribing somebody a diet is a bit unusual, but this diet is the single most effect and time tested tool in my medical toolbox to bring blood pressure, insulin resistance, cholesterol and weight back to their optimum values and then keep them there for life. Now it doesn’t work for everybody for every condition, but it does work for most people and for most conditions. As such we use it as our first line of treatment and only use drugs as a last resort due to the many and sometimes dangerous side effects of drugs treatments. And even if we do have to bring in drug treatment, we still want you to move to this diet so that we can eventually stop the drugs since taken long term they can have their own very serious health issues.

      In our very short time today we don’t have time to go into details, but basically this is a diet that moves whole grains, potatoes, beans and peas, leafy greens, and other vegetables and fruits to the center of your plate and ask that you fill up on those foods. And then that you move all the meat, seafood, eggs and cheese to at least small amounts on the edge of your plate or even better off of your plate for all but special occasions. I’m not asking you to be perfect, but the closer to an entirely plant based diet you can get the more effective this diet will be in reversing the conditions that brought you in today. I know that this seems like a pretty extreme change, but suffering from years or decades of ill health and dying years sooner than you otherwise would is pretty extreme too. So I do hope that you will at least try this course of treatment and see how you react. And just so that you know that I practice what I prescribe, this is the diet that I and my family follow. When we started, I too had elevated BP, insulin resistance, cholesterol and carried a spare tire around my middle just in case of famine. Now all of my numbers are optimal and no spare tire as you can see. And I have to say that I have never felt healthier and more energetic.

      Please stop by the front desk where my staff will give you some material to read, point you to some trustworthy resources on the internet and make an appointment for you and your wife with our dietician who will go into greater detail about how some foods can help to heal your body of illness and disease and how other foods can be the root cause of those very same illnesses and diseases. I would like to see you back in a month after you start eating your new diet since that is usually all that is needed to completely reverse everything we found today.”




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      1. That would be lovely! Perhaps one day… but first, of course, medical schools have to teach doctors about this and the drug companies have to stop writing the medical text books and giving most doctors their continuing education, etc. I’d love to see it happen!




        2
    3. Great testimonial Joe. Upon reading your story, I suddenly realized that I used to suffer from sinus congestion all the time, but since I have been eating a WFPBD at about the 90% level ( progressing toward 100%) my sinuses are much clearer and my breathing much more free! Wow! More motivation to get to 100%!




      5
  4. This video seems to be a bomb! Can this be used also if you don’t have cancer but if you have prostatis?
    Dr. Greger please answer!

    Thanks
    Christian




    5
    1. Christian,

      Can’t agree more with Rebecca’s comments. You might consider also having your urine checked, by submitting the first morning void. If you do have an infection it should be addressed.

      Checking your level of hydration, ie. are you consuming a copious amount of liquid every day ? Do you experience dry eyes or a dry mouth typically ? And sexual function and frequency along with zinc levels are to be considered. I would urge you to have a prostate exam and talk to your physician about your urinary habits.

      As an aside, there are no lack of published studies on various food products….. such as pumpkin seeds and the list is long….https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25196580 and https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1297501/. Granted they are both confirmatory but more than suggestive …. and remember just two of many articles.

      Dr. Alan Kadish moderator for Dr. Greger




      1
      1. Good answer.

        Sometimes, however, science and health professionals overlook the obvious.
        Anyone who has an enlarged prostate (all aging men?), does not test positive for a bacterial infection and is peeing frequently is likely to have irritation to the lining of the urinary tract and around the head of the penis i.e. redness externally and a burning inflamed feeling when urinating.
        The increased frequency of exposure to acidic urine irritates the urinary tract lining and the skin around the tip of the penis.
        It’s like walking 100 miles a day. Your shoes are going to get worn out very quickly.

        The only way to reverse this I.M.O is to look for treatments that shrink the prostate the evidence of which would be reduced frequency of urination.
        Some very minor relief can be achieved by wiping and wash the tip of the penis with damp toilet paper after every visit to the loo and applying a water repellent cream like a lanolin based handcream (something with no added chemicals) plus avoiding diuretics, like coffee, helps to reduce the frequency which gives some minor relief.
        If a ‘cure’ doesn’t reduce the measured size of the prostate it’s not a cure.
        Given that all aging men have expanding prostates it seems the cause is being a male and growing older. It’s hard to imagine a cure for that.
        I would be interested to see any evidence of diet reducing frequency of enlarged prostate in any male population.
        Especially interested in the difference between frequency of prostatitis in lacto-vegetarians versus the general male population.




        0
      2. If my theory is correct men with enlarged Prostate and no infection have a different kind of UTI (Urinary Tract Irritation)e

        To treat this we could try drinking a lot of water to weaken the urine but that seems counter-productive as frequency of urination will go up.

        A possibility for minor relief might be to alkalise the urine – possible with diet but difficult to maintain.
        Also possible with a common household substance taken as a supplement but the urine alkalinity subsides quickly and would depend on continuous ingestion which probably has unintended consequences.
        Some health practitioners do prescribe alkalising substances for UTInfections, to alkalise the urine in order to kill off acid loving bacteria but once again to maintain that day in and day out might be problematical.

        Achieving neutral, or alkaline, urine over the long term might be possible for some individuals with a sustained dietary effort.




        0
    2. Hi Christian,

      There is no correlation between Prostatitis (benign enlarged Prostate) and Prostate cancer.
      It would be difficult, if not impossible, to clinically prove the effectiveness of any treatment in preventing, or reducing, Prostate enlargement in aging males over the short term as it develops over the term of our life, starting at puberty.
      Long term trials or epidemiological studies might provide some clues.




      0
    3. Here is one example of a promising trial with a ‘natural’ supplement.

      We have to be cautious though as the outcome is measured using the IPSS score which is subjective i.e. they ask the patient how they feel and how many times a night they pee et. c

      http://www.complementarytherapiesinmedicine.com/article/S0965-2299(13)00025-3/fulltext

      Now, if they had measured a reduction in the average prostate size, across the supplement trial group, versus the placebo group, I would rush out and buy shares in the company.
      Even if they had achieved a significant reduction in observed frequency of urination I would start getting excited (perhaps they could fit a fitbit to the Penis)




      0
  5. Among the many great videos on nutrtionfacts.org, this one stands out in my mind as one of the very best!
    thanks a million to Dr. G and all who support his efforts!




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  6. Good info though of course no surprise to longtime subscribers.
    Regardless of the video editing style I always watch with fingers on the pause and reverse buttons. I want to read those parts of the reports the video rushes over.




    4
  7. This is a terrific video packed full of good info applicable to most of us dealing with health challenges of any kind or simply wanting to experience continued good health. Thank you Dr Greger and team . Also thanks to James, Jim, and to all for the helpful, inspiring posts today.. reading, learning and being encouraged is all part of what makes NF such a valuable resource.




    5
  8. Is there an actual supplement that combines these components (referenced in video) available? Anyone know name/where to buy? Can’t hurt.




    0
    1. I may be wrong, but I think Dr. G’s point is that the real whole foods would be far better. The only reason for using the dried supplement was to overcome the placebo difficulty. So while you are probably correct the supplement won’t hurt, that would be the case only if so doing would not cause one to fail to take the step up to the better alternate whole foods if that option is available.




      3
        1. I have the same question myself. In some way wouldn’t it be beneficial to take a ‘multivitamin’ which is based from real plants sources, like either Pomi-T or Juice+ or something like that? If the point of the video is that taking a cross section of helpful antioxidants and phytonutrients together is more powerful than just taking one or two, wouldn’t taking something that say has a little bit of 30 or 40 different fruits and vegetables in it provide potentially even better nutritional value than just eating or two of those a day? Not to say that you wouldn’t still eat lots in addition, but wouldn’t it provide a good nutritional base?




          1
  9. Please consider a video about lectin. Doctor Steven R. Gundry, MD (author of “The Plant Paradox”) has a lot to say about lectins. Thanks




    2
    1. I agree George. That would be a very interesting topic. I know that if you sprout beans and then cook them, you get rid of almost all of the lectins. That’s what I do, every week.
      John S




      1
  10. George I haven’t noticed him posting references to his gibberish. Have you? I don’t have time for that. Between lectin and night shade discussions! Poor guy.




    1
  11. I’ve been watching NF videos for years. I just want to appeal to you all to please go back to the old presentation style and stop all the page movement. It’s nauseating. Also, the video on this page is too big for my 13.5 inch laptop screen so I now watch on youtube, which I don’t like to do because I want to read all the comments on the board. Please consider your presentation. The new BIG in your face design is no enjoyable to everyone.

    Thanks,
    Mark




    7
    1. Yes, I agree, Mark. The old style was much better. It seems as though tech people like to make changes just for the sake of making them, and the result is often worse, not better, than what was changed. Also, the new style doesn’t allow editing, so if you make a mistake, you’re stuck with it. If you can improve the style, great; otherwise, leave well enough alone!




      3
    2. Mark,

      I prefer the old style as well, but it’s easy to click on the little Full Screen icon to get the whole picture, then just hit Exit at the end. My Chromebook is probably different from whatever you are using, but the icon should be with the video – bottom, far right.




      1
  12. In this video, Dr. Greger states:

    In my video on pomegranate and prostate cancer, pomegranate pills appeared useless in the treatment for prostate cancer, and the same disappointing results with a pomegranate beverage. But that was just a pomegranate extract as well.

    What does he mean by “a pomegranate beverage”? A beverage is not an extract. It’s either the result of juicing a pomegranate (or juicing the pomegranate seeds) or it’s juice that is made from a pomegranate concentrate. I use a pomegranate concentrate, of which I simply add a tablespoon to a half cup of water. So why does he say that the “pomegranate beverage” was “just a pomegranate extract”? The two are not the same if by “pomegranate beverage” he means pomegranate juice. There’s a big difference between pomegranate juice, which is simply the juice from the whole fruit, and a pomegranate extract, which is restricted to the active ingredient — the ellagic acid.

    So my question is: How does consuming a pomegranate concentrate, which is made from juicing the pomegranate seeds, compare with consuming the seeds themselves? I should think that the nutritional benefit of the concentrate would have many, if not all, of the synergistic components of the seeds themselves, while the extract would not, but would be restricted largely to the ellagic acid, considered to be the “active principle.”




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  13. Pomegranates aren’t cooked. When you make a commercial fruit juice, you are legally required to boil /pasteurize it, thereby destroying much of the antioxidants and vitamin C. I don’t buy the commercial juice. I just buy the organic pomegranate and eat it. Interesting to think about what other greens, berries, etc. might combine with it.




    2
    1. John,

      The pomegranate concentrate that I use comes from Brownwood Acres, which does not boil or heat their concentrates. From their website:

      -Cold Filled Single Ingredient
      -No Additives
      -No Preservatives
      -Certified Kosher
      -No GMO’
      -6 Different Flavors

      So just what does Cold filled Fruit Juice Concentrate mean? It means we do not heat our juices when filling the bottles. This type of heat can cause damage to the anthocyanins (antioxidants) in the concentrate. Be sure to use cold filled fruit juices if you’re consuming these for health reasons.




      2
    1. hi Elena, the way I look at it , this whole website is a response by Dr Greger to the perils of consuming animal foods, to the benefits of eating whole plant foods, and to the hazards lurking within our everyday food environment. You could start your search here, https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/protein/ which will give you more than enough reason to choose whole plant foods. All the best to you.




      3
  14. I have prostate cancer. I had surgery and radiation and it came back. Doctors have offered nothing in terms of diet, supplements, … I have tried a lot of things. Gave up meat and dairy long ago. This is a wonderful video! I tried pomegranate juice and extract pills with no success. Today I went to the store to buy some whole pomegranates. No one has them, I am told they are seasonal, a winter fruit. Oh great! Well, they do sell the seeds in packages in the produce section. I bought a few packages and trying them. Plan is to keep eating them until the whole fruit is available. I am also consuming matcha green tea, broccoli and curcumin.

    I have read that turmeric is not absorbed well. That makes me wonder about the turmeric amount in the pills mentioned in the video.




    1
    1. hi Dave, I do not know if you have seen this old video, but its one of the best for chevking out which vegies proved to be the very best in fighting (or preventing) cancer. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=8tAAehC4BYs Its doctor greger showing test results of many vegies on various cancers. Go to 8:26 in the video to see the page on prostate cancer and pause the video to check out the vegies. Allium and cruciferous families of veg are the best, along with a variety of fruit and berries. All the best to you.




      2
  15. Question to anyone – With this new format, did we lose the “Previous Video” link? I found that particularly helpful when I wanted to go back and revisit it to follow comments/discussions.

    Also, does anyone besides me find the Facebook, Twitter, and Google icons on the left side of the viewing page distracting and annoying?

    To NF team – I am so sorry you went to this new format. What I particularly miss when searching for videos are the pictoral icons. I remember the video I want to revisit, once I’ve entered the subject, by the pictures associated with it. I so wish you would reinstitute that.
    Thanks!




    2
  16. After reading a meta-analyse from The German Institute of Human NutritionAm J Clin Nutr. 2017 Apr 26. pii: ajcn153148. [Epub ahead of print], I wonder how Dr. Gregor established the daily amounts per food group in his daily dozen app. There seems to be a nonlinear response rate for nuts, fruits and vegetables and a linear response rate for whole grains and peas. I compared the Nutritionfacts amounts with the study at hand, here.




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    1. I think it has a lot of chemicals or preservatives, doesn’t it? It’s been awhile since I read the label, but I know that after reading it, I didn’t buy Quorn.




      1
    2. Hi, Frannyh, I am a volunteer for Dr. Greger.

      Quorn is a heavily processed food, with high levels of sodium. I would not advocate it as a healthy food. However, it is likely better than processed and red meats. I hope this helps!




      1
  17. I thought I recalled that there was egg white in quorn products, so I googled it; here is the result:

    Quorn Ingredients – Quorn Foods

    http://www.quorn.com/quorn-ingredients/
    We then add a small amount of egg white (or potato extract in our vegan products), shape it and then freeze it before adding it to Quorn products, so that our .

    Egg whites are, of course animal products, animal protein, and to be avoided.




    1
      1. blockquote, div.yahoo_quoted { margin-left: 0 !important; border-left:1px #715FFA solid !important; padding-left:1ex !important; background-color:white !important; } I keep a lot of things in my ref that others don’t. All my nuts, all my whole grain flours, my dried herbs, popcorn, etc. 

        Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone




        0
    1. Thanks for your question.

      I found one study that demonstrated that:

      “milled flaxseed can be stored up to 4 months at ambient temperatures without noticeable changes in quality. The presence of endogenous antioxidants in the milled flaxseed may account for the stability observed.”

      On the other hand, one study states that:

      “Quality degradation occurs in particular with excessively moist and excessively hot product, and may be recognized from internal and/or external discolouration of the seed and a musty odor. Flaxseed has a storage life of more than 12 months at 9–10% water content. To the best of our knowledge, there is no evidence on the physical properties of flaxseed.”

      Hope this answer helps.




      1
  18. “Best Supplements for Prostate Cancer”

    But what if I don’t want prostate cancer? ;-)

    Seriously, I love your site and they way you pick apart studies in particular. We need a guy like you Dr Greger! Thanks for all that you do. It’s just that this title could use a re-think.




    0
  19. I wanted to know if there is such a thing as eating too much fruit. For example, what if instead of 1 serving of berries a day I have 3? Is that bad?




    0
    1. Hi Fiama,

      I think you will find this video helpful.
      “Seventeen people were made to eat twenty servings a day of fruit. Despite the extraordinarily high fructose content of this diet, presumably about 200 grams a day—8 cans of soda worth—the investigators reported no adverse effects (and possible benefit actually) for body weight, blood pressure, and insulin and lipid levels (fats in the blood) after three to six months. More recently, Jenkins and colleagues put people on about a twenty-servings-of-fruit-a-day diet for a few weeks, and no adverse effects on weight or blood pressure or triglycerides, and an astounding 38-point drop in LDL cholesterol.”




      0
  20. Thank you Dr. G!!! what a great video! I often explain the Reductionist paradigm in nutrition to my “scientifically” minded friends and am never sure if they REALLY get it. I will add this video to the bag on that topic. I love the part that showed the “Synergy” of the phytochemicals was greater than consuming them separately. Perfect! Also, I use the illustration in T. Colin Campbell’s book – Whole – which uses an apple experiment, which is very similar to this.




    0
  21. I had an idea for the research: give all tested patients one pomegranate and one pill, and this pill could be placebo or not, and then analyse how efficient the pill is.




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  22. I know dark chocolate is good for fighting cancer, but I read the label on my 90% Coco bar. For a small serving, it has 13g of saturated fat! Is that really ok to be eating???




    0

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