Pomegranate vs. Placebo for Prostate Cancer

Pomegranate vs. Placebo for Prostate Cancer
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Pomegranate juice for prostate cancer was finally put to the test in a randomized controlled clinical trial.

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The pomegranate has been revered through the ages for its medicinal properties. So much so, it’s been used as a symbol for some medical organizations. A fruit seems to be a better representation of health than a snake on a stick.

Supposedly beneficial for a wide range of diseases. Even the cannibals love it, improving the color of “kid meat”—no, they’re talking about baby goats. It just made me double-take when I saw this study.

Most of the attention over the last decade has focused on pomegranates and prostate cancer. Starting with in vitro studies, showing more and more pomegranate extract can suppress the growth of prostate cancer cells in a petri dish by up to 95%.

Well, what about normal prostate cells? This is what normal prostate cells look like under a microscope, with a little or a lot of pomegranate extract. No real difference. Doesn’t seem to do much to healthy cells.

But, here’s what prostate cancer looks like; just decimated by the pomegranate. But, this was in a petri dish, not a person. Yes, if these results translated to the clinic, it could be dramatic. But first, we have to try it out in people.

Primary management of prostate cancer consists of either radical surgery, or radiation. Despite this, a significant number of patients relapse, and ultimately develop metastatic disease. Even after a radical prostatectomy, in about a third of the patients, the cancer comes back, as evidenced by rising PSA levels. At that point, the treatment options are limited—you already took out the prostate. The next step is essentially chemical castration; hormonal ablation. Just like breast cancer can thrive on estrogen, prostate cancer can thrive on testosterone. So, you can try to wipe out testosterone, but that can have such negative side effects. Anything we can do to delay that would be good. 

So, what about plants? They note that men in Asia have the lowest prostate cancer rates in the world: up to ten times less than North America. Now, is this just a genetic thing? No. When Japanese individuals move to the United States and start living and eating like us, their breast and prostate cancer rates shoot up right towards ours. This could be because of what they’re eating more of here; animal products are the strongest risk factor for prostate cancer worldwide, on a country by country basis.

Or, because of what they’re eating less of here—their traditional low-fat, high-fiber diets, with soy products, and green tea, and plant-rich in general. So, did these researchers try sticking these cancer patients on a plant-based diet? No. They just had them drink a cup of pomegranate juice every day. Why? Because the study was funded by the pomegranate juice folks. At least they were allowed to take it by mouth.

So, what happened? Well, in the three years leading up to the study, their cancer was steadily growing, as measured by their average PSA levels going up. Then, once they started the juice, their tumors continued to grow, but it looks like they were growing slower.

Now, in contrast, Dr. Dean Ornish and colleagues got an apparent reversal in early prostate cancer growth with a plant-based diet and other healthy lifestyle changes. PSA didn’t just go up slower; it trended down. And, dripping the blood of the men on prostate cancer growing in a lab, the blood serum of those eating healthy suppressed cancer growth nearly eight times better; whereas the blood of the men on the juice just suppressed cancer growth by about 12%. But still, to see anything, just drinking a cup of juice every day, is pretty impressive.

The problem is that there was no control group. Now, you could say they kind of acted as their own controls; this is them before, and after. It’s probably not just a coincidence that their tumors started growing slower right when they started the juice. But, check this out.

This is a drug trial trying to do the same thing—treat men with recurring prostate cancer after surgery or radiation. In the drug group, tumor growth slowed in 55% of the men. Pretty effective drug, right? The sugar pill worked 73% of the time. The placebo effect can be so powerful that it may slow cancer growth. This is why we need placebo-controlled trials. Maybe tricking people into drinking pomegranate-flavored Kool-Aid would have the same effect. You think you’re doing something for yourself, and so the cancer might slow.  You don’t know, until you put it to the test.

Finally, a randomized controlled trial of pomegranate juice for prostate cancer. And, as you can read in the title, it had no impact. What do they mean, no impact? 25% of the cancer patients appeared to shrink their tumors as soon as they started drinking the pomegranate juice. Yeah, but 35% shrunk their tumors not drinking pomegranate juice.

So, any effect appears to just be a placebo. It’s the same story with pomegranate extract pills. They seemed to work, until they went head to head with sugar pills, and fell flat on their face.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Katie Schloer.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to PublicDomainPictures and edenirocha via Pixabay.

The pomegranate has been revered through the ages for its medicinal properties. So much so, it’s been used as a symbol for some medical organizations. A fruit seems to be a better representation of health than a snake on a stick.

Supposedly beneficial for a wide range of diseases. Even the cannibals love it, improving the color of “kid meat”—no, they’re talking about baby goats. It just made me double-take when I saw this study.

Most of the attention over the last decade has focused on pomegranates and prostate cancer. Starting with in vitro studies, showing more and more pomegranate extract can suppress the growth of prostate cancer cells in a petri dish by up to 95%.

Well, what about normal prostate cells? This is what normal prostate cells look like under a microscope, with a little or a lot of pomegranate extract. No real difference. Doesn’t seem to do much to healthy cells.

But, here’s what prostate cancer looks like; just decimated by the pomegranate. But, this was in a petri dish, not a person. Yes, if these results translated to the clinic, it could be dramatic. But first, we have to try it out in people.

Primary management of prostate cancer consists of either radical surgery, or radiation. Despite this, a significant number of patients relapse, and ultimately develop metastatic disease. Even after a radical prostatectomy, in about a third of the patients, the cancer comes back, as evidenced by rising PSA levels. At that point, the treatment options are limited—you already took out the prostate. The next step is essentially chemical castration; hormonal ablation. Just like breast cancer can thrive on estrogen, prostate cancer can thrive on testosterone. So, you can try to wipe out testosterone, but that can have such negative side effects. Anything we can do to delay that would be good. 

So, what about plants? They note that men in Asia have the lowest prostate cancer rates in the world: up to ten times less than North America. Now, is this just a genetic thing? No. When Japanese individuals move to the United States and start living and eating like us, their breast and prostate cancer rates shoot up right towards ours. This could be because of what they’re eating more of here; animal products are the strongest risk factor for prostate cancer worldwide, on a country by country basis.

Or, because of what they’re eating less of here—their traditional low-fat, high-fiber diets, with soy products, and green tea, and plant-rich in general. So, did these researchers try sticking these cancer patients on a plant-based diet? No. They just had them drink a cup of pomegranate juice every day. Why? Because the study was funded by the pomegranate juice folks. At least they were allowed to take it by mouth.

So, what happened? Well, in the three years leading up to the study, their cancer was steadily growing, as measured by their average PSA levels going up. Then, once they started the juice, their tumors continued to grow, but it looks like they were growing slower.

Now, in contrast, Dr. Dean Ornish and colleagues got an apparent reversal in early prostate cancer growth with a plant-based diet and other healthy lifestyle changes. PSA didn’t just go up slower; it trended down. And, dripping the blood of the men on prostate cancer growing in a lab, the blood serum of those eating healthy suppressed cancer growth nearly eight times better; whereas the blood of the men on the juice just suppressed cancer growth by about 12%. But still, to see anything, just drinking a cup of juice every day, is pretty impressive.

The problem is that there was no control group. Now, you could say they kind of acted as their own controls; this is them before, and after. It’s probably not just a coincidence that their tumors started growing slower right when they started the juice. But, check this out.

This is a drug trial trying to do the same thing—treat men with recurring prostate cancer after surgery or radiation. In the drug group, tumor growth slowed in 55% of the men. Pretty effective drug, right? The sugar pill worked 73% of the time. The placebo effect can be so powerful that it may slow cancer growth. This is why we need placebo-controlled trials. Maybe tricking people into drinking pomegranate-flavored Kool-Aid would have the same effect. You think you’re doing something for yourself, and so the cancer might slow.  You don’t know, until you put it to the test.

Finally, a randomized controlled trial of pomegranate juice for prostate cancer. And, as you can read in the title, it had no impact. What do they mean, no impact? 25% of the cancer patients appeared to shrink their tumors as soon as they started drinking the pomegranate juice. Yeah, but 35% shrunk their tumors not drinking pomegranate juice.

So, any effect appears to just be a placebo. It’s the same story with pomegranate extract pills. They seemed to work, until they went head to head with sugar pills, and fell flat on their face.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Katie Schloer.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to PublicDomainPictures and edenirocha via Pixabay.

Doctor's Note

I love pomegranates! Unfortunately, the juice and extracts look no more promising than when I did my video Is Pomegranate Juice That Wonderful?

For some foods that may actually affect prostate cancer progression, see:

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

149 responses to “Pomegranate vs. Placebo for Prostate Cancer

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  1. Great video! Off topic question: there’s some controversy in Italy about small children being fed vegan diets by their parents having nutrient deficiencies: Is a WFPB diet sufficient for providing small children with the vitamins and minerals they need (i.e. the Italian kids were served too many processed foods or too little variety), or do small kids needs more concentrated sources of certain nutrients, in the form of animal products, because their digestive tracts are not developed enough yet to get all their nutrients from fibrous plant foods?
    Thanks!




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    1. Position of the American Dietetic Association: vegetarian diets.
      Craig WJ1, Mangels AR; American Dietetic Association.
      Author information
      Abstract
      It is the position of the American Dietetic Association that appropriately planned vegetarian diets, including total vegetarian or vegan diets, are healthful, nutritionally adequate, and may provide health benefits in the prevention and treatment of certain diseases. Well-planned vegetarian diets are appropriate for individuals during all stages of the life cycle, including pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, and adolescence, and for athletes. A vegetarian diet is defined as one that does not include meat (including fowl) or seafood, or products containing those foods. This article reviews the current data related to key nutrients for vegetarians including protein, n-3 fatty acids, iron, zinc, iodine, calcium, and vitamins D and B-12. A vegetarian diet can meet current recommendations for all of these nutrients. In some cases, supplements or fortified foods can provide useful amounts of important nutrients. An evidence- based review showed that vegetarian diets can be nutritionally adequate in pregnancy and result in positive maternal and infant health outcomes. The results of an evidence-based review showed that a vegetarian diet is associated with a lower risk of death from ischemic heart disease. Vegetarians also appear to have lower low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, lower blood pressure, and lower rates of hypertension and type 2 diabetes than nonvegetarians. Furthermore, vegetarians tend to have a lower body mass index and lower overall cancer rates. Features of a vegetarian diet that may reduce risk of chronic disease include lower intakes of saturated fat and cholesterol and higher intakes of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, soy products, fiber, and phytochemicals. The variability of dietary practices among vegetarians makes individual assessment of dietary adequacy essential. In addition to assessing dietary adequacy, food and nutrition professionals can also play key roles in educating vegetarians about sources of specific nutrients, food purchase and preparation, and dietary modifications to meet their needs.




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        1. Right, chips and soda are “vegan”, but not at all healthy. Plant products as they come from the earth are the foods to seek out, and not just a bunny diet… we have amylase to digest starch unlike most animals, and they should make up the bulk of our diets.




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        2. “Well planned” is what is lacking in nearly every child’s diet in the developed world and increasingly in the developing world as well as they abandon their healthy whole food plant based (to at least a first order approximation since even the traditional diets had a small percentage of calories from animal products) diet.

          So it is the Carnist that we really need to worry about as parents and their children blindly and unthinkingly eat the Standard Western Diet that gets on average get less than 10% of its calories from whole plant foods.




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      1. A vegetarian diet is not the same as the whole foods, plant-based diet that Dr. Greger recommends. A vegetarian diet allows dairy and egg products while this diet doesn’t. Does the American Dietetic Association or some other scientific body have anything to say about the adequacy of vegan diets for children?




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        1. I think you missed the part where they said “including total vegetarian or vegan diets”. They are specifically including diets that abstain from all animal products.




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          1. One problem with the definition of vegan is that you can be an unhealthy vegan eating lots of prepared foods with loads of oil and preservatives, and that is a totally different diet than a raw food vegan or a vegan who only eats whole plant based foods. Vegetarian is even more problematic, with dairy and eggs giving you most of the health problems of eating meat, although it really depends on what is the center of your diet, not the definition.




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        2. Here’s an interesting article that compares omnivore, vegetarian an vegan diets. It finds that although a vegan diet has certain nutritional advantages, careful planning is still necessary, especially in infants and small children. In particular, the authors are concerned that a vegan diet, if limited in variety, may lack iron, vitamin D and B-12 and possibly, n-3 fatty acids. In certain regions, it may be low in iodine and selenium, if grown in soil poor in those minerals. It also expressed concern that a vegan diet may be too bulky for the amount of energy provided for children and the possibility that nutrients may not be absorbed because of the presence of phytates, trypsin inhibitors and cyanide-producing plants such as cassava, also called yucca, maniac or tapioca.

          https://www.researchgate.net/publication/12834164_The_nutritional_adequacy_of_plant-based_diets




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            1. I look at Phytates as nature way to suppress cancer growth. If you eat Phytate foods exclusively then phytate will suppress the nutrients but if you eat a variety of foods, they will cancel each others. So it’s better to mix phytate foods with non phytate foods.




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          1. This is a very old study (1999 is the study’s date). When I look at a research study, I do a couple of things: 1) look at the date of the study, 2) see if there is any more current research available, 3) see if the study is in a peer reviewed evidence based journal, ; 4) see if the author has disclosed any conflicts and 5) see who provided funding for the study.
            In the case of the date of the study, and if there is any more recent research available, I am excited by information coming out of Loma Linda (which is an Adventist based university) where long term studies on vegetarians, vegans, et al has been done. There is always confounding that can happen on the part of researchers who project their own biases onto a research outcome, however, I have found the data coming from Loma Linda to be exceptional. I hope you find it interesting!




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          2. What the people worried about a vegan diet never point out is that a diet that isn’t vegan is more likely to cause overweight or obesity, possible type 2 diabetes as early as the higher grades of elementary school, and the problems with milk: 100% of chronic childhood constipation and anal fissures reversed with the discontinuance of dairy products – among many other problems.




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      2. I have read this position statement from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (the new name for the ADA) and use it often as confirmation for clients and friends that one can ensure nutritional adequacy with a plant based diet. Unfortunately, for many who proclaim themselves vegan or vegetarian (no one who comments on THIS site, of course :-) ) they eat french fries, doritos, and green drinks and think themselves healthy. Oh, and they drink alcohol like fishes (sorry, fishes) and proclaim themselves as vegans. I have counseled many a disordered eater (with a clinical eating disorder) who tell me they are vegan or vegetarian and then also tell me all of the plant based foods they don’t eat because they think they are not healthy: corn, soy, beans, nuts, the list goes on and on.
        One of the best ways to ensure your OWN nutritional adequacy is to download a calorie tracking app, I like Lose It (no financial compensation for me). Enter ALL of the food you eat for three days (a week is better), then see how your percentages of protein, carbohydrate, and fat comes out. You can even look at micronutritients, or other categories. Information is power – and technology tools can help us know the truth about our diets.




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    2. The Italian thing is a bit (actually a lot) overblown by the media. The actual bill is about child abuse through malnutrition, and does not mention vegetarian or vegan diets in the text anywhere. A recently publicized incident in Italy of a “vegan” family who endangered their child is a key example as to why they want to introduce such legislation. That child was not being fed a proper diet at all, and the parents had been warned by their physician that the child was deficient in calories, protein, calcium, and a variety of other nutrients (any of which could easily be found on vegan diet). After the parents refused to supplement the child to meet minimal nutritional standards and their child continued to fail to thrive, the Italian authorities removed the child from their custody. Getting back on track of your question about the adequacy of the WFPB diet; Small kids (i.e. babies) do need more concentrated sources of nutrients than super fibrous foods, but breastmilk, or Soy infant formula can provide that without requiring “animal products”. I guess you could consider breastmilk an animal product, But I assure you Dr. Greger believes that breast is best for babies, and that breastmilk is included in the WFPB diet umbrella for babies.




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      1. I am trying to look at the side of the Italian authority that kids may have a hard time eating enough foods and a WPFB diet has a lot of fiber and they don’t eat enough of a variety of plant foods for their nutrition needs. Even adults have hard time eating a true nutritious WPFP diet. Judging from this web site, I see that a lot of people call themselves WFPB and they eat a few lettuce and cucumber slices per day.




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        1. All parents have a basic responsibility to feed their children a healthy diet. The sad fact is that most, especially the carnist parents as evidences by the skyrocketing weight of our children, don’t. It could be because the parents themselves don’t care about the health impacts of their own diet, and just eat what they like or were raised eating. But more likely they are, thanks to the skewed and misleading “science” funded by the large food industries and associations who are only interested in selling more product, completely confused about what is and what is not a healthy diet. For most people the functional definition of a healthy diet seems to be one that doesn’t make you feel immediately sick. So two scoops of ice cream every night is OK, but three scoops isn’t because it makes your stomach upset.




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        2. Oh, and I have call you on your statement that kids can’t get enough calories and nutrients on a WFPB diet. Simply not true. Kids are actually able to eat more food, as represented as a percentage of their body mass, than adults. I know for certain that applied to my brother and I when we were kids. Family was always teasing us that we must have a hollow leg that we are stashing all the food we were eating in. Thus children have no trouble eating sufficient volumes of lower caloric density food to meet all of their nutritional needs. And all the fiber that comes with it eliminates one of the chronic constipation that a shockingly high percentage of children suffer from.

          As for adults, the only trouble with eating a nutritious WFPB diet is desire to do so. If you don’t want to eat it, then you will find that it is too hard. Otherwise, it is simplicity itself.

          And your final comment is coming dangerously close to troll territory. You have been pretty reasonable and even handed in your comments to this point. Don’t ruin it with comments like this. Nobody here talks about eating a few lettuce leaves and a slice or two of cucumber. If anything it is the reverse with people amazed at the incredible volume of food that they can eat so that they can feel pleasantly stuffed and still lose weight.




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          1. Geez, do I have to put a fight every freaking day with the mod police, then self righteous people? Where did I say that kids cannot have enough nutrition with WFPB foods? I said that with kids, sometimes they don’t want to eat and it’s difficult to get them enough nutrition if they don’t to eat sufficient WFPB foods. Do you have any kid of your own or does your gene end with you? I remember what I have to go through to raise my kids when they were little. In the morning, I am in a hurry to go to work and so is my wife and we have to take turn to feed them before we can take them to daycare/school, and in the evening the routine repeats again until bed time. They don’t want to eat no matter how I tried or let them hungry for days. So do I worry about feeding them strictly WFPB foods or feed them something semi healthy that they are willing to swallow? Now my kids are all grown up, they eat healthy and plenty of plant foods on their own.

            It’s this kind of one size fit all, self righteous attitude from a few individuals that makes me SICK. Even a person with cancer, or a pregnant person have to stuff in their throat 2 sweet potatoes per day, a cup of nut, a cup of bean, 5 bags of kale, 4 bags of spinach per day to make these self righteous people happy.

            So now you can call me a troll or whatever. Are you going to call the mod police to delete my posts or ban me? Be my guest but I won’t shut up. I am sure that you know who is here 24 hours a day guarding this blog like a hawk.

            All of you self righteous people need to take some fish oil to calm you down. I think you are all getting close to be psycho.




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            1. Jimmy: Please review the rules for posting on this site. You have broken the rules and your post is being deleted. You can find the rules in the FAQ page linked to at the bottom of every page on NutritionFacts.

              FYI: I had the same interpretation of your post that Jim Felder did. He is not off the wall in his response. If you don’t want people to misconstrue your posts, careful wording is helpful. If you don’t like being challenged on your posts, this may not be a good place for you to participate. – Moderator




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          2. I agree with you 100%, Jim. I am a bad parent, sorry. I should have stuffed in my kids throat 2 sweet potatoes, a cup of nut, a cup of bean, 2 bags of kale, 2 bags of spinach every day. They would be much more intelligent and win a Nobel Prize today rather than just get to grad school. And they will live to 150 year of age.




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        3. This is why fat is so important. For instance, a sweet potato, bad meal for an under two year old. But mash in an avocado with the sweet potato and now you have something suitable for a two year old.




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        4. Hey Jimmy. I wanted to share with you what I ate today. Breakfast: oatmeal with flaxseed meal, walnuts, sliced banana, and frozen berries. Lunch: Chinese noodles with ginger garlic sauce and a black bean stew. Dinner: mashed potatoes, salad, corn, bread, and green beans.




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          1. It sounds delicious and nutritional and it makes me hungry :) I usually don’t eat too much in the evening and so I juice only and eat a small salad. I eat something similar to you during the day not necessarily in the same order. That’s my main meal for enjoyment but I also have my “yucky” smoothie where I put so much vegetables and blend them and drink it so that I can meet my nutrition quota. If I put this much vegetables in my dish then it will destroy the taste.




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      1. Lisa Schmidt: Some person or group in Italy is capitalizing on a child abuse case to try to pass a law that feeding children a vegan diet is illegal. Moderator Darchite found a good article that helps to explain the flaws in the thinking behind the law: http://www.thelondoneconomic.com/tle-pick/italys-threat-to-vegan-parents-is-an-attack-on-human-rights/11/08/

        More recently, Dr. Barnard from PCRM (Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine) came up with a response: “Have you heard about a proposed Italian law that could make it illegal for parents to feed their children a vegan diet? Dr. Barnard responds in a new blog and talks about four reasons why plant-based diets can benefit the health of children.” http://www.pcrm.org/nbBlog/four-ways-vegan-diets-can-benefit-kids

        I also really like the response that Gio kindly supplied today.




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    3. A vegan or vegetarian diet could be all empty calories based on refined junk food. I knew a guy once who was raised from birth on a healthy vegan diet. He was 6’1″ super healthy, trim and had a muscular athletic body. I wish I had been raised that way.




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    4. It is impotant to note that while a WFPB diet is vegan, a vegan diet is not necessarily WFPB. Unfortunately, that analogy is not as trivial as the original term that it is coined from: all beans are legumes, but not all legumes are beans. Beans and legumes are both incredibly healthy, but a vegan diet without guidance is not. I honestly vehemently hate when my friends call me vegan, because I don’t even consider myself one. Yes, I don’t eat animal products, but I don’t want to be grouped with individuals who throw down oreos, oil, and “vegan butter” every day.

      Italy is obviously very ignorant about nutrition, and nutrition research to even contemplate such a ridiculous notion.




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      1. I wouldn’t throw all Italians under the bus. This law was something proposed by one member of the Italian parliament. She has a Facebook page and so if you can read Italian, you can read some of what she says on a number of topics including this one I suppose. I don’t speak/read Italian so I have to take the word of those writing about her. Those reports say that she is a conservative politically and apparently nutritionally as well. My guess is that all of this is her conservative reaction to a shift away from all the traditional foods that she grew up with and so she lashes out driven by fear of change (a common conservative motivation).




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      2. Oh, and I very much agree on not calling myself at least a vegan. One, we still eat animal products when we find ourselves in situations where everything to eat has some bit of animal in it and we don’t want to make a fuss, call attention to ourselves or offend our hosts. And two, vegan is, like you say, only a statement about what you don’t eat, not what you do. Considering the reckless comments I have read some vegans making about not needing B-12 because they don’t need anything that “came from an animal”, maybe parents who self-identify as vegan should have to prove that they actually know a little something about eating a healthy diet without any animal products.

        Of course, but the same token carnist parents should have to prove that they know that they can’t feed their kids nothing but meat, cheese, ice cream, sugary yogurt and junk plant foods, that they actually have to make sure that they eat a significant amounts of fruits and vegetables every day.




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    5. Hi – I’m going to weigh in here just a little bit. My cousin, who is now 28-ish, refused to eat any meat from the time she was a toddler. . .just would not do it. She did eat dairy for years but as a young adult gave that up as well and has been totally vegan for years. She just gave birth to her first child, fully formed, fully developed, appropriate weight, no issues. So she fed her baby on a whole foods plant based diet. She and her husband intend to raise this baby that way as well. I intend to follow this situation, but I think that I already know what the good result is going to be.

      Also, . . .Benjamin Spock, M.D. . . known as America’s pediatrician. .. went WFPB in his later years (noting that his health improved) and then updated his nutritional information in his last book stating that children SHOULD be raised WFPB, that this was in their best interest. His last book was published in 1998 I believe – you can still get it from the libraries I believe.

      Also, . .of interest. . .is the fact that human Mother’s milk is somewhere between 3% and 6% protein (depending on the source you use). Cows milk is approximately 14% protein. Rat mother’s milk is 49% protein. ALL mammal milks are different and are made by the mother to match the biological needs of their baby. Period. Nothing more, nothing less.
      If you want to know what human babies should eat, . . just take a look at chimpanzees . . our closes cousins sharing almost 99% of the same genes. THEIR children don’t need concentrated animals protein (although it’s been noted that chimps do eat a small amount – very small!!! – and infrequent!!! – of animals foods).

      The meat and dairy industry have so many people so brainwashed that we end up doubting our own good common sense.
      Don’t do it!!




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    6. What infants digestive tracts are developed for is mother’s milk. Period. For the first year for example. “Formula” nutrition analysis is nowhere near close to mother’s milk. Cow’s milk is for small brained big boned calves, there’s even a correlation between cows milk before three months of age can lead to Type 1 diabetes. Now my wife did breast feeding for three months and then gradually added baby foods. There’s a lot more info available now on mother’s milk than we had forty years ago. BTW, as an aside, mother’s milk varies but about 7% protein is typical, just right amount and amino acid mix when infants are growing fastest. Analysis recommendations on vegan protein is 10% of the daily calories, not more, and of course when the infant would have been naturally weaned. For more info read “The China Study” by Cornell nutritional biochemist prof. T. Colin Campbell.




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    7. The big problem is with lowfat diets. Children, especially under the age of two, have an increased need for fat. There are some vegan nutjobs out there that think a lowfat vegan diet is suitable for children if they just eat enough calories. I think this is where the issue sometimes happens with kids not thriving on a vegan diet.




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  2. A third of prostatectomy victims have their cancer come back!!! Yikes. I’m one of those victims and I was told by my surgeon that there was a 15% chance for someone like me who had a Gleason score of 8 (very high). Also, after 5 years I would be home free (I’m now at 4 years + and all is well – so far).

    I certainly hope the 1/3 figure is way pessimistic. Maybe my switching a few years ago to a WFPB diet will help keep me on the better side of the curve.




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    1. Prostate cancer is better off to be left alone unless it causes symptoms. If there is no symptom, just monitor it but not treat it. A lot of prostate cancer is benign. When you operate on it, you make it spread.

      That’s what I read in medical literature.

      Note that prostate cancer in this country and the world ballooned up after the PSA test was invented. Previously people don’t even know they have prostate “cancer”. Google for the article which says that the inventor of the PSA test is sorry that he invented it.




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      1. http://www.ranker.com/list/famous-people-who-died-of-prostate-cancer/reference

        This is a list of 328 “famous” people who probably would agree with you if they hadn’t gone and died from prostate cancer.

        My cancer was close to becoming uncontained although I had no symptoms. Ignoring it would have ultimately been fatal.

        The PSA inventor feels that widespread screening is a waste, but for people with a family history (like me) it is beneficial.

        What royally p_sses me off is that I probably could have avoided the whole mess by eating properly from a young age. And, what’s even more irritating is that changing my diet when my PSA first started going up might have reversed it.




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        1. I don’t know who is right and who is wrong. Based on some statistics, even Harvard Medical School now recommends not to do the PSA screening but wait to see any prostate symptom before doing it. You know how statistics works, even if 98% is one way and 2% is the other way but you happen to be in that 2% then you are doomed. So they must have based on some kind of statistics to come up with this kind of recommendation. I see that the medical profession has the tendency toward more diagnostic tests, not the other way around. But for them to say less testing, they must be based on something.

          You can use Saw Palmetto supplement to alleviate your symptoms. I see a lot of people using it with success. Mushroom helps too because it contains selenium. Or you can take also a selenium supplement.

          Dr McDougall said that his dad had prostate cancer since an early age but he died with it and not because of it.




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  3. I wonder if there have been any well-designed studies using the pomegranate arils (seeds) rather than just the juice? I’m a firm believer (based on evidence based studies) that the whole plant is always better than just the juice!




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    1. Hal, I’ve often read that the quality of pomegranates varies. Also: the powerful eligatannins which make up some of it’s power are also in the rind. The best juices are made from seeds as well as rinds! I don’t know about Pom, though I have some doubts…
      Additionally some people may be able to profit much more from pomegranate juice than others:
      See this study, admittedly not about prostate cancer:
      https://www.newscientist.com/article/2096689-pomegranate-by-product-boosts-muscles-and-may-fight-ageing/




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    2. Actually, it’s pomegranate peels that pack the phenolic punch, according to this
      study. It showed that the peels had 10 times more phenols than the pulp, and nearly four times the flavonoids—registering, in fact, the highest antioxidant level of any of the 28 fruits commonly consumed in China. A summary of the study failed to indicate whether the ethanol, methanol & acetone used to extract those nutrients from the peel had any vitiating effect on their health benefits, however.




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      1. This is interesting because it reminds me that the highest concentration of all antioxidants and plant protective compounds are found in the inedible parts of the plants (peels, leaves, bark, etc). It seems that those protective compounds are in plants not for us (HA!) but to protect plants from insect consumption. In clinical studies of bioactive compounds in plants, the highest concentrations of all “bioactive compounds” consistently show up in inedible parts.
        I did a graduate school project where I concocted some roasted Mango peel to take advantage of the Mangosteen that is found in the peel. Guess what? It was inedible!!!




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        1. Is the pomegranate peel inedible because it just tastes bad (sour, etc) or is it unhealthy/poisonous, i.e. would make one sick in some way? If it’s the first case, then blending it in a smoothie with other good foods might give one the benefits without the bad taste.




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          1. I assume that it is just like the peel of orange and you can eat it except that the orange part of the peel is not useful but the white part is. In fact that where are most of the nutrients, in particular the pectin. So I use a vegetable peeler to remove the yellow part but consume the white part. The yellow part is harmless to eat but it makes the veggie hard to digest.

            Pomegranate is so delicious to eat the seeds that I don’t want to make it into a smoothie to drink.




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        2. Since here in FL mangoes are available almost year round, I have actually eaten the skins, though they are sometimes pretty tough they taste okay. Maybe dropping them into the blender as a smoothie ingredient?




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    3. Utilizing “pomegranate juice” is certainly inferior to the whole food itself. The nutrients in the juice began to degrade and oxidize after juicing and it was likely pasteurized which degrade nutrients significantly. As you implied there are nutrients in the seed and fiber that is discarded through the juicing process (punicic acid, for example). Though I would imagine that it would be much more difficult to conduct double-blind research with arils…it would be challenging to give patients a placebo, for example. I believe the peel is richest in nutrients, though it’s quite bitter. During pomegranate season I cut the peel, freeze it and then add small bits of the peel to my smoothie.




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      1. Thanks for your reply. Do you have any idea how much peel would be safe to put in a smoothie? What do you think would be the max level before the peel became toxic, if at all? TIA.




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        1. From a practical perspective your smoothie will become bitter quite quickly. For example a 1/4″ square piece of peel (per 8 oz) may be bordering on too much. If you are aiming to maximize the health benefits of your smoothie with minimum toxicity a more optimal method would be to add a little bit of pomegranate peel (from a good source) and then other nutrient dense components. I aim for breadth over depth, in other words a wide variety of ingredients rather than a lot of a just a few. There are some studies on the safety of pomegranate peel. This one suggests that bread (the subject of the study) be fortified with no more than 2.5% of pomegranate peel. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23429604




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          1. Interesting research paper … thanks for sharing. From the abstract, it looks like the peel does get toxic as the amount is increased. (“An increased death rate of the brine shrimp larvae was found as a function of the replacement of wheat flour with Pomegranate Peel Powder.”)




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            1. Yes, absolutely right…pretty much everything..perhaps everything becomes toxic at some point…too much broccoli, turmeric, green tea, etc….You can find toxicity studies on all of these..too little and the positive effect is not statistically significant, too much and it becomes toxic….That’s certainly one of the reasons I aim for “breadth over depth”.




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    4. I agree Hal. Green Med INfo has some studies on pomegranates. Legally in the US, you are required to boil the juice to sell it, thereby killing vit C, antioxidants and juice removes fiber. I eat the pomegranate rather than buy the juice, but as Dr. G says, “Big Pomegranate won’t fund that study.” John S




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  4. Interesting how doctors without any objection just accept the (well described) placebo effect, but reject all the evidence that a mainly plantbased diet can prevent, halt, reverse and even cure diseases. Just saying…




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        1. Vegan burger is easier to make than to make non vegan broccoli. You know making something that tastes good like meat is always easier than making something that stinks like … broccoli :)




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              1. Yes, raw broccoli has no bad smell or bad taste either. I like it, too. I know that some people make broccoli slaw. Hopefully they don’t ruin it with disgusting mayonnaise, even if it is the so-called “vegan” type.




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    1. Equally puzzling is why the placebo effect is denigrated instead of utilized for healing! Another flaw of modern medicine… separating the mind from the body, they are mutual.




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      1. Gale,
        Still around! Just busy these days.
        Exercising is fine, but no running – the old knee….
        Is everything well in Paradise?




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  5. Interesting about the placebo effect. I am going to start my drug company selling sugar pills and charging an arm and a leg for it because people will think the more pricey it is, the better the drug is. There is no FDA approval required because there is no side effect, guaranteed. So I will start my drug company today. Any investors? You will participate in a pre IPO company.




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    1. There have been studies that show when a Dr TELLS a patient, “this is a sugar pill, but I want you to take it” the patient gets better even KNOWING it is a sugar pill! There is something to be said for the relationship between a physician and his/her patient, as well as our expectancy to get better. The mind is indeed powerful!




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      1. Lisa Schmidt: Wow. That’s pretty amazing. I like that approach, because it preserves the ability to trust your doctor. A doctor could even say (with all honesty) something like, “This is a sugar pill, but I have seen it help in situations like yours. I want you to try it.” I’m thinking: Hearing a doctor say that it has already worked could add further “mojo” for the pill.




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        1. I always try to remember: The relation heals. And the cheapest of all tricks: Listen to the patient – I mean really listen – in their story the patients often present the solution themselves. And then add some broccoli!!! :-)




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      2. There is also tale when the doctor says to a cancer patient that he/she has 3 months to live and he/she dies exactly in 3 months while being still healthy and on a camping trip. So I understand the need to tell a patient when he/she will die so that they can plan but it also dims all hope of living and kills the patient with just words.




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    2. My ex would help out at his friend’s deli and when they had products on sale, certain people would take advantage of it, but many would not because they said the “sale products” were inferior, when in reality they were no different. The laugh is, they would buy the same OLD sale salami or whatever, after it went off sale, and because it cost more, they insisted it was better! Made me laugh! Humans are such an enigma!




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      1. “Humans are such an enigma”. And so easily manipulated! Hoe does the old saying go : “Fool me once, shame on you; Fool me twice, shame on me!”




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  6. I wonder if this is what is happening with homeopathic treatments to all sorts of ailments, There’s no scientific evidence that homeopathy works, but I know people who swear by them.




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  7. Have you looked at Pomi t trials in uk ? This is a tablet made up of pomigranet , green tea, broccoli & tumeric . It appears to have seen excellent results . I take it after having had breast cancer . I would be interested in your thoughts




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    1. I went to the Pomi t website. One thing that stood out was simply the quantities of the equivalent foods. For example the broccoli equivalent is 750 mg…that’s a really, really small amount of broccoli. To put it differently, a typical serving of broccoli is much higher in nutrients than the broccoli powder component of the pill. Also, I would encourage you to eat a variety of cruciferous vegetables, kale, cabbage, kohlrabi, etc…not just broccoli powder.

      Its best to eat a wide variety of whole foods, rather than a pill. However if you do not feel inclined to eat cabbage, kale, broccoli, turmeric, pomegranate, etc…than this pill may be of benefit.




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      1. “However if you do not feel inclined to eat cabbage, kale, broccoli, turmeric, pomegranate, etc…than this pill may be of benefit.”

        There is a veggie enzyme supplement on the market. It’s for people who cannot eat raw vegetables to get the enzyme or they are not getting enough. Apparently it does something because some people cannot take it and get upset stomach. I eat the real vegetables and so I don’t need it but for some people, it may help.

        From one of those enzyme pills:

        Enzyme Benefits
        Lipase – aids in the breakdown and digestion of fats and oils, such as those found in nuts and seeds, avocados, and dairy or other animal products.
        Amylase – helps the body break down long-chain carbohydrates, also known as complex carbs, such as those found in whole grains and root vegetables.
        Protease – aids in the break down of proteins into simpler amino acids for more complete digestion and assimilation.
        Lactase – aids the body in the proper digestion of the sugar molecule lactose, found specifically within milk and other dairy products.
        Cellulase – helps to break down soluble and insoluble fibers, so the body can extract and receive optimal nutrition from the plant foods we eat.
        Phytase – helps accelerate the chemical breakdown of phytic acid, an indigestible organic molecule found within many nuts, seeds, and grains.
        Maltase – breaks down maltose, a sugar molecule produced during the digestion of starches found within certain cereals, legumes, and grains.




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    2. A don’t see how an extract of some portions of plants that are healthy when consumed as food would have any better effect than just eating those foods directly. Unless you are taking them by the bowlful, the only way that they can claim to have the same effectiveness as the actual food is if they extract and refine just the portions that they think are responsible for the health effects. This is an example of reductionist thinking that assumes that one effect has to have one cause. The fact that this approach dominates much of nutritional research doesn’t mean that it leads to a correct conclusions. And in fact Dr. T. Colin Campbell of China Study fame talks extensively in his follow-on book Whole (highly, highly recommended) on how this approach is a major part of the problem in advancing understanding of human health and nutrition rather than the sole pathway to the solution.

      So I think it is almost certain that if these tablets contain only selected phytochemicals extracted from the whole plants that they don’t have the same effect as would be had if one simply consumed the whole food. It doesn’t matter if they say that the extract is equivalent to many times the amount of whole food than you could possibly eat. Whole food contains dozens, hundreds, and even thousands of biologically active compounds, often working together in a synergistic way. Plucking just one of them out and supplying large amounts of it would likely have a similar effect as picking out the violins as being the key instrument in the orchestra, firing everyone but the violinists, and then packing the stage with another hundred violinist. Is there any doubt that the resulting “orchestra” would perform anything like the original orchestra with the rich and complex interplay between the different tonality and texture of full range of instruments. And not only that there would be stretch of silence or long simple repeats by the violins where other instruments would have had the lead and carried the melody. And then during the forte violin parts, OMG! So even for the parts where violins are truly needed the normal dozen or two provides the right drama where as a hundred or two would shatter your nervous system.

      But even if the phytochemicals they do extract are in fact the only ones that matter and have the claimed effect in isolation, there is nothing to say that the extraction process used doesn’t reduce or completely destroy the effectiveness of the compounds. And lastly supplements, at least in the US, are completely unregulated, so they might not even contain what they say they do. I know that Germany does have more regulation and oversight of supplements.Not sure about the UK.

      So I would just focus on the whole plant foods rather than highly refined plant fragments, Also, if you haven’t already, I would view all the videos on this website related to cancer. A very clear picture emerges about the relationship of diet and cancer. Whole plant foods for the most part do not promote or support the growth of cancers, and in fact just the opposite as in this video. Plants actively support the body as it eliminates the cancer from the body. Animal foods on the other hand stimulate the increased production of hormones/enzymes like Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and Target of Rapamycin (TOR), both of which are key to the progression of cancer beyond pinhead sized tumors. So they might not cause the cancer to start, but they are central to its progression, and it is the progression that eventually kills us not the tiny tumors that never progress. Even the differences in protein between plants and animals effects cancer. Animal protein contains a much higher percentage of methionine than plant protein, and a number of cancers have been found to be a href=”http://nutritionfacts.org/video/starving-cancer-with-methionine-restriction/”>highly dependent on methionine.

      Population studies back this up with populations with the lowest animal food and highest whole plant foods having cancer rates that are a fraction of what they are here.




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  8. Hello! I am a volunteer moderator for Nutritionfacts joining you for this discussion. I am also a dietitian with a MS degree trained in a whole foods, mostly plant based approach. Looking forward to reading your amazing comments!




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  9. Interesting to see that although the incidence of prostate cancer is about one-third higher in North America than in Europe (according to the chart at 2:25), the mortality rate is actually higher in Europe. Does this stat reflect the final capitulation of the European diet to the onslaught of American fast food? Can it be a testament to the superiority of the American medical system? Or are Americans just eating lots more sugar pills?




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  10. I use a organic pomegranate concentrate to make a glass of green drink every day. I add a tbls of organic alfalfa powder and a tbls. or organic wheatgrass powder to get minerals, etc. The pomegranate juice makes it taste soooo DELICIOUS!!. Sorry to hear about the unhopeful results with prostrate cancer.




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  11. If you have any type of caner you always want to attack it from a multifactorial point of view. Never just relying on just one thing. Also, there are test that some Dr. dont mention or dont know about that can tell you if you still have cancer cells or you can use these test to see if you might have a concern with a family history of cancer. why wait till you have a lump or a bump?




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  12. I’m not sure what this is suggesting. I was disappointed with the ending of the video not wrapping things up.
    Asian indigenous people have the lowest rate of cancer but are at par when on an American diet, so is this suggesting that pomegranate in itself has no effect or is pomegranate altogether not a healthy plant based choice?
    The video didn’t mention whether the Asian people ate pomegranate or not.




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  13. Hello I am wondering if someone can help me. I am a Dietetic Intern and I am teaching a class on heart health. I wanted to know if I could use a copy of Dr. Greger’s daily dozen as a handout to the class. Am I allowed to use this? Also is there somewhere on this site that I can print a pdf version or any other version? Thank you for your help




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    1. I can’t answer the fair use copyright question (which i assume is ok) but regarding how to make a pdf of this post, you can click on the link for the transcript, then copy/paste the text in a document and save as a pdf.

      Mark




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      1. Thanks Mark. Yeah I am assuming it is ok as well but never hurts to ask and I would also make sure the source is cited. I was curious if this site had a PDF version of DR. Greger’s Daily Dozen foods but then again I guess it would not be hard for me to make one and still make sure everything is cited correctly. Thanks for the help. I realize this post was not related to the video but thought I might get the quickest reply on the newest video.




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        1. Hi Jake-
          You did the right thing by posting your off-topic question here. As you probably saw, Dr Greger invites people to do that. I’m just a regular site user, like you. You’ll find that most people here are really helpful and there are very few trolls. So it’s a friendly easy place where everyone tries to help each other. I think it’s great that you plan to share this information. It’s always great to get the information out there. And you’re likely to have a more receptive audience. You’ll find lots of stories here of people sharing information with friends and family who are suffering from conditions that could be reversed, but they don’t change their diets. It’s really quite remarkable. So any advancing of the information is a good thing in my book.

          Cheers,
          Mark




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    2. Jake Edmiston: I passed you questions on to the staff at NutritionFacts. They said that while they don’t have a .pdf made up, you are welcome to make one up as long as you give the reference of course. They checked with the book manufacturer and there is no copyright problem sharing the Daily Dozen and it’s little boxes. :-)
      .
      Your students are lucky to have you!




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      1. Thank you for checking for me. I went ahead and made a sheet which hopefully they can put on the fridge or somewhere they will notice each day. I made sure to reference the source of course while adding in the nutritionfacts website and the app. I thought the handout would be good for people to try to eat these foods instead of telling them what not to eat.

        Thanks again for the help.




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  14. Atrazine is getting some recent headlines for it’s widespread proliferation and it’s ability to change the sex of exposed frogs. I wonder if’s connected to BPH or prostate cancer in more medical literature.




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  15. Ellagic acid and the ellagitannins found especially in pomegranite, raspberries, and walnuts are metabolised by the gut microbiota and absorbed as bioactive urolithins. In the test tube, urolithins inhibit cancer cell proliferation, with urolithin B having the most antiproliferative activity, while urolithin A is among very few compounds known to induce mitophagy (clearance of damaged cellular energy generating organelles). Humans vary markedly in the capacity of their gut microbiota to produce urolithins. Some produce urolithin A, some (often those with dysbiosis associated chronic disease) produce urolithins A and B, and up to 25% produce no urolithins at all. This undoubtedly confounds results from trials, and hopefully future studies will stratify their results by urolithin phenotype, and prebiotic or probiotic interventions will be devised to maximize benefits from these foods.




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    1. Yes, it might prove to be of utmost importance that these phenolics can also be found in other foods: walnuts,strawberries, raspberries and others. Combining small amounts of these foods may well be as effective as eating pomegranates daily….




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    2. What other compounds help clear out damaged mitochondria? Ergothioneine? What compounds cause ROS in the mitochondria? I understand that methionine does. The scientists who take a metabolic approach to cancer believe that damage to the mitochondria of cells initiates the disease, and that the downstream effect is genetic damage.




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      1. There’s an experimental drug candidate PMI that also induces mitophagy, and toxic protoniphores like CCCP can induce mitophagy in the lab.

        ROS production is intrinsic to mitochondrial function, but can be markedly reduced by mild uncoupling. The body uses uncoupling proteins (UCPs), such as those responsible for the non-shivering thermogenesis of brown fat, to accomplish this, and there are some dietary compounds (capsaicin, menthol, anacardic acid) that induce UCPs and fat browning.




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      1. Its debatable. In my third link and this new study, urolithin B production is more common in those with dysbiosis related disease, while the only microbes confirmed to produce urolithin A so far are strains of Gordonibacter, which have also been associated with bacteremia and Crohn’s. The consensus, however, is that the more diverse a microbiome is (including with microbes with mixed associations), the better the health effects.




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  16. I worked few years in Urology Prostate cancers was a target of my work , as for women Japanese diet is significantly preventing prostate and breast cancers, After years of working on that subject I found interesting to have results in another population less evaluated with another fruit in the diet, Most of the scavenger effect is possible only with carriers or co-nutrients. The discrepancy between supplements, action in petri dish and real life is a response to the individual metabolism some diets help people to make it , others not , and we are not able to understand the missing part to make a new prevention/treatment until we will found it




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  17. The urologist did a prostate biopsy and the mail away lab did this stain, that stain, and the other and diagnosed advanced cancer.
    Second opinion from Massachusetts General Hospital to quote the resident pathologist: “If I had those irregular cells you wouldn’t operate on me for that.” Diagnosis, irregular cells, not cancer cells.
    So the MGH urologists tracked me for ten years and said at 80, “You’ve graduated” because at that age I might die of something else but not prostate cancer.




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  18. How I wish I could meet Dr. Greger or another good physician once, tell them about my situation and ask them some questions. I am literally wasting away from a plethora of illnesses at the age of 25 and even five years (and counting) on a vegan, whole-food diet did absolutely nothing to improve my health. I don’t think there is any hope for me…




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    1. PancakeTutu: I’m so sorry to hear about your problems. It sounds simply awful.
      .
      Have you heard of Dr. Michael Klaper? He is a well respected doctor who is very knowledgeable about plant based eating and diet related diseases. And he does phone consultations. I have no idea how much they cost or if he can help you or not. But wasting away is not an option and calling Dr. Klaper provides some hope. Don’t give up! If you are interested, http://doctorklaper.com/answers/




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      1. Another option is Dr. Joel Fuhrman’s members forums. You can get tons of help and I don’t think its that much. Dr. Fuhrman is a real expert on dealing with that small minority of people who don’t thrive on a vegan diet.




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        1. Benjamin Dowell: Thanks for that additional idea. Dr. Klaper also has worked with people in that situation. But it’s good to have options! If one does not work out, try the other. Don’t give up hope. Thanks!




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  19. I think this video should at least point out that pomegranates do have some important nutritional value. I was reading a few abstracts on PubMed that said that some studies indicate that pomegranates help support nitric oxide production in the arteries. This is good news for anyone who has high blood pressure or atherosclerosis in their arteries. If do not mention any redeeming value for pomegranates in such a video as this, someone might consider pomegranates a waste of time and money, especially when you realize how difficult it is to extract the juice from the seeds. I have two of them waiting for me on the kitchen cabinet. There are some quick easy methods on YouTube that show you how to extract the juice from pomegranates in a timely and efficient manner.




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    1. Thanks for your comment John.

      We certainly agree that pomegranate has its benefits as mentioned in this review.

      However, this video is still informative in regards to prostate cancer treatment, and therefore it analyses a very specific situation. By no means Dr Greger states that pomegranates cannot be part of a healthy diet, the focus is indeed a whole food plant diet.

      Thanks for your input.




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  20. _OFF TOPIC_ but then “common ground” for us who “meet” this way: Howdee, I’m back. Been “offline” a few days making repairs after a HDD failure. No more HDD’s for me! Solid State!!! Had to set up OS’s and switched to Mint/W7 dual boot setup. Then all the supporting softwares and add-ons and extensions and settings! Beginning to “fit” again. The Solid State Drive is amazingly fast and silent-even with my (dated) 2007 infrastructure. SATA!




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      1. At this moment I’m pulling files off a duplicate of the dead drive. On Linux Mint now, but am MISSING the Pantheon GUI of Elementary (hot corners!). So many options and variations in the free-OS world.




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  21. If it proofs as true, it will be amazing. I’m living by eating mostly fruits and vegetables, even though I’m not refusing meat, but seeing what kind of effect fruits can have on this kind of diseases makes me hopeful about the future.




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  22. i am a M.D. specialized in prostate cancer and nutrition. the double blind study study from Switzerland was not done with pomegranate juice but with a sugar drink containing a bit of pomegranate and almost no real pomegranate polyphenols, such as punicalagin. in addition it was done on metastatic pca patients, This is a very different story: it is like a cold and pneumonia. intense chemo gives 2-3 months more (horrible) life time in metastatic pca, so what to expect of a sugar drink. with high polpyhenol pomegranate products, and sulforaphane from brokkoli seeds alone and even better with low fat, plant based diet and exercise pca grwoth can best stopped, especially in low risk prostate cancers. In high risk you can slow progression.
    in the Ornish study the the PSA stopped falling after the first year and went up again. Still great work and great approach,




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  23. The study you mainly cited (by Stenner-Liewen) has a rather odd design. They drank mostly sugary juice in both groups and only 138 of the 500 ml drink was actually pomegranate juice. In the second half of the study they reduced the dose even further. The juice they used had also been tested and contained only very little polyphynoles. Last but not least the the patients had very bad cases of prostate cancer…

    I’m not saying that what you (or the study) said is wrong but I’d suggest you give pomegranate another look when more studies are released.




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  24. Just like Tomato seeds and antiplatelet activity, perhaps it is the bitter Pomegranate seed and not the juice which yields the desired cytotoxic effect to prostate cancer cells.

    How about a study where men just ate a pomegranate a day.




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