Is Cheese Really Bad for You?

Is Cheese Really Bad for You?
4.71 (94.12%) 187 votes

What about the recent studies that show cheese has neutral or positive health effects?

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

In a series of videos I did about saturated fat, I talked about a major campaign launched by the global dairy industry to “neutralise the negative image of milkfat among regulators and health professionals as related to heart disease.” That campaign continues, to this day, with the publication of a meta-analysis demonstrating “neutral (meaning non-harmful) associations between dairy products and cardiovascular [disease and death].”

Okay, well, first of all, how do we know the dairy industry had anything to do with this study? Well, it was published in a journal that forces authors to disclose financial conflicts of interest. Let’s see what they divulged. Dairy, dairy, dairy, dairy, dairy, dairy, the fourth largest dairy company in the world, dairy, dairy, milk, beer, soda, McDonald’s, dairy, dairy, dairy, dairy, dairy. Oh, and the study itself was explicitly funded by dairy, dairy, dairy. Okay, then.

The other big new one was this, suggesting that a little bit of cheese every day isn’t just neutral, but actually good for you. And they make it clear that they have “no conflict of interest;” they’re just employees of the Yili Innovation Center and the Yili R&D Center. You know, “China’s largest dairy producer”….making it one of the world’s largest dairy companies.

Okay, but how can cheese consumption be associated with better health outcomes? Well, most of these studies were from Europe, where cheese consumption is associated with a higher socioeconomic status. See, in Europe they’re not eating Cheez Whiz and Velveeta. “Cheese is generally an expensive product.”

And so, who eats cheese? Those with higher-paying jobs, higher socioeconomic strata, higher education levels—all of which are associated with better health outcomes, which may have nothing to do with their cheese consumption. Higher socioeconomic groups also consume more fruits and vegetables and more candies. So, I bet you could do a population study and show candy consumption is associated with better health. Shh, don’t tell the National Confectioner’s Association. Too late! Did you know that candy consumers have lower levels of inflammation, a “14% decreased risk of elevated…blood pressure”? Brought to you by the candy industry and the USDA, our government, which props up the sugar industry to the tune of a billion dollars a year.

It’s like when our tax dollars are used to buy up surplus cheese. Paul Shapiro wrote a great editorial. Imagine the headline “Government Buys $20 Million in Surplus Pepsi,” our hard-earned tax dollars “buying millions of unwanted cola cans, all as a favor to the flailing soda industry, which just kept producing drinks no one wanted. As outrageous as such a government handout to the soda industry would be, that’s exactly what the [USDA] is doing for the…dairy industry.”

Michele Simon did a great report on how our government colludes with the industry to “promote dairy junk foods.” The federal government administers “’check-off programs’ to promote milk and dairy.” McDonald’s has “six dedicated dairy checkoff program employees at its corporate headquarters” to try to squeeze in more cheese. That’s how we got “double steak quesadillas.” That’s how we got “3-Cheese Stuffed Crust Pizza,” complete with a “Summer of Cheese.” “These funds are being used to promote junk foods, which contribute to the very diseases our federal government is allegedly trying to prevent. Does it make sense to tell Americans to avoid foods high in salt, sugar, and saturated fat, while engaging in the promotion of those same foods?”

Look: “The meat and dairy industries can do what they like with their own money. The public power of taxation should be used for the public good”—not to support the dairy and candy industries.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: lipefontes0 via Pixabay. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

In a series of videos I did about saturated fat, I talked about a major campaign launched by the global dairy industry to “neutralise the negative image of milkfat among regulators and health professionals as related to heart disease.” That campaign continues, to this day, with the publication of a meta-analysis demonstrating “neutral (meaning non-harmful) associations between dairy products and cardiovascular [disease and death].”

Okay, well, first of all, how do we know the dairy industry had anything to do with this study? Well, it was published in a journal that forces authors to disclose financial conflicts of interest. Let’s see what they divulged. Dairy, dairy, dairy, dairy, dairy, dairy, the fourth largest dairy company in the world, dairy, dairy, milk, beer, soda, McDonald’s, dairy, dairy, dairy, dairy, dairy. Oh, and the study itself was explicitly funded by dairy, dairy, dairy. Okay, then.

The other big new one was this, suggesting that a little bit of cheese every day isn’t just neutral, but actually good for you. And they make it clear that they have “no conflict of interest;” they’re just employees of the Yili Innovation Center and the Yili R&D Center. You know, “China’s largest dairy producer”….making it one of the world’s largest dairy companies.

Okay, but how can cheese consumption be associated with better health outcomes? Well, most of these studies were from Europe, where cheese consumption is associated with a higher socioeconomic status. See, in Europe they’re not eating Cheez Whiz and Velveeta. “Cheese is generally an expensive product.”

And so, who eats cheese? Those with higher-paying jobs, higher socioeconomic strata, higher education levels—all of which are associated with better health outcomes, which may have nothing to do with their cheese consumption. Higher socioeconomic groups also consume more fruits and vegetables and more candies. So, I bet you could do a population study and show candy consumption is associated with better health. Shh, don’t tell the National Confectioner’s Association. Too late! Did you know that candy consumers have lower levels of inflammation, a “14% decreased risk of elevated…blood pressure”? Brought to you by the candy industry and the USDA, our government, which props up the sugar industry to the tune of a billion dollars a year.

It’s like when our tax dollars are used to buy up surplus cheese. Paul Shapiro wrote a great editorial. Imagine the headline “Government Buys $20 Million in Surplus Pepsi,” our hard-earned tax dollars “buying millions of unwanted cola cans, all as a favor to the flailing soda industry, which just kept producing drinks no one wanted. As outrageous as such a government handout to the soda industry would be, that’s exactly what the [USDA] is doing for the…dairy industry.”

Michele Simon did a great report on how our government colludes with the industry to “promote dairy junk foods.” The federal government administers “’check-off programs’ to promote milk and dairy.” McDonald’s has “six dedicated dairy checkoff program employees at its corporate headquarters” to try to squeeze in more cheese. That’s how we got “double steak quesadillas.” That’s how we got “3-Cheese Stuffed Crust Pizza,” complete with a “Summer of Cheese.” “These funds are being used to promote junk foods, which contribute to the very diseases our federal government is allegedly trying to prevent. Does it make sense to tell Americans to avoid foods high in salt, sugar, and saturated fat, while engaging in the promotion of those same foods?”

Look: “The meat and dairy industries can do what they like with their own money. The public power of taxation should be used for the public good”—not to support the dairy and candy industries.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: lipefontes0 via Pixabay. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video.

Doctor's Note

Just because study is industry-funded doesn’t necessarily mean it’s bad science, though. Stay tuned for Is Cheese Healthy? Compared to What? and How the Dairy Industry Designs Misleading Studies.

Here is the series I mentioned in the video:

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here and to my audio podcast here (subscribe by clicking on your mobile device’s icon). 

144 responses to “Is Cheese Really Bad for You?

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    1. And as Mercury is gearing up to turn retrograde in a couple of days, I suspect I will refrain from posting here until sometime later in December.

      Am afraid I’ll say something “fierce” — something I’ll regret. :-(

        1. Fumbles, that would be most apropos; I am indeed a Goddess. ;-)

          Yes, I do like the Egyptian goddess part, but Bastet sound too much like “bastard,” y’know what I mean? Maybe a Brooklyn accent might do it justice, though. As in, “Get outta heah, ya crummy bastet!” but I doubt if it would fit moi.

          (“Fantastic Feline” might work. Meow?)

          1. ‘Bastet sound too much like “bastard,” y’know what I mean?’

            I do but, given the opportunities for jokes about cats/pussies, I would have thought that this would actually be an improvement.

        2. I hate to tell you this but all you really succeeded to do with this video is illustrate who paid for the studies you mentioned. You did not answer the question put forward in the title “Is cheese really bad for you?” So what is the answer??

            1. Also, cheese is part of lunch in the school for kids in France. It is a regular, not elite school. It is just part of a healthy lunch where kids have bread, vegetables, protein, desert and cheese. Everyday different. Sorry…
              The fact we react in too many negative ways to cheese , probably, in our life and environment in general, culture of eating and much more, quality of food, not cheese.

          1. The studies funded by dairy say it is not bad and the neutral studies say that it is bad and Dr Barnard would add that it is bad and addictive.

            At that juncture, there will be more videos, but you have to ask yourself which researchers you believe.

            Is it clearer when the candy industry makes the same claims?

            There were these young girls online who were tricked by an elderly-ish con artist into believing they could lose weight on a sugar dirt and they gained 50 pounds and what I thought was that they wanted it to be true so much that they didn’t figure it out in the first 40 pounds they gained.

            Cheese is addictive but what I will tell you is that I have been off of it since January and now if I have a slice of pizza, which I did a few times, cheese constipates me and makes me feel queasy. I went to a baby shower this weekend and had coffee with one creamer and genuinely felt sick after and when I came here almost a year ago, I said that I wouldn’t give up dairy, but I didn’t have a weight change and real health change until I did.

            1. I ask again, does the candy study confuse you?

              If not, then you have a different mental process with cheese, because the industry did the same process to get the same results.

          2. You are only quoting half the title of the video.

            You have to read the full title to understand how accurately it describes the contents of the video.

          3. @Suezq Well, he did answer in a round-about way if you think about it. We know what the study says: no harmful affects, but that is according to the dairy industry’s study. If you want to see what unbiased studies say on the matter, simply enter “dairy” into the search box.

            “I hate to tell you this but all you really succeeded to do with this video is illustrate who paid for the studies you mentioned. You did not answer the question put forward in the title “Is cheese really bad for you?” So what is the answer??”

          4. Oo! Pick me, pick me!! I can answer that!! Yes! No? I mean maybe… If our brains are working right, we should be able to come to a very intelligent solution about cheese. That government cheese pushed on us back in the 1970’s was awful!! Yuck! It was like the government was targeting the poor and trying to kill us off! Hummm? No! Not “our” government!
            I wonder how many choices of cheese there are? Excluding government cheese! And IF cheese is properly fermented, what is considered good & too much to be bad? I’m sure there are no studies for this, so I would go for: If you feel you need to eat cheese, moderation & a good quality.

        1. Ron, I’m saying Mercury retrograde is the only transit I pay much attention to. It seems to affect many of us. One good thing (or maybe not) is that we’re apt to hear or meet up with somebody from our past….somebody we haven’t seen for quite a while.

          Already I’m feeling it. I was supposed to head down to my dentist this a.m. regarding a new lower partial they’re giving me, but the office called a half hour before I was to board the bus. (Got up early for nothing.) It seems there was some strange smoke in the building and nobody was allowed in for much of the morning. So now the appointment is next Monday. I hope.

          Also, planned a luncheon with friends tomorrow, but it sounds like we’re cancelling that too. It’s thought we’ll be getting some snow action in these-‘ere parts that would affect travel (ruled by Mercury). And so it goes.

          https://www.astrologyuniversity.com/mercury-retrograde-november-2018/

  1. MACA – Make America Cheesy Again, but not with Velveeta because it’s FAKE cheese!

    If one still craves something that smells like socks after a 20 mile hike, Nutritional Yeast will do the trick without all of the salt, sugar, and saturated fat.

    1. That’s funny. I can’t stand the smell of it either. When I ate such things, (the first 38 years of my life), I ate tons of it. I was overweight and unhealthy too. Then I continued to eat vegan cheeses for 15 years after going vegan. After 3 years WFPB, I find the smell of cheese absolutely repulsive.
      https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/dairy/

      1. Blair,

        Yes, eating it prevented me from losing weight,

        I went off everything else, except dairy and didn’t lose a pound until I went off dairy.

        I genuinely didn’t even understand that it was 80% fat. I am not sure what I thought was in it, but that explained everything.

      2. Hi Blair, I hated cheese when I was young, but I got to used to it because it was so ubiquitous. Cheese was the first animal product I gave up on my journey to becoming vegan because it’s so fatty, greasy and oily. Now I just think of it as death food.

    2. Yep, cheese smells like sweaty socks and coffee like a burning old boot. Considering the smell and taste of these two, no one would consume them if they weren’t addictive, coffee because of the caffeine and dairy products because of the casomorphines.

      See https://nutritionfacts.org/2012/06/21/cows-milk-casomorphin-crib-death-and-autism/

      I’ve met people who almost became vegans except that they just couldn’t kick the cheese habit. I never had a problem with a coffee addiction. I’m a super-fast caffeine metabolizer and so, I’ve never gotten even the slightest buzz from coffee in the 10 or 20 times in my life that Ive’ tried it. As a result, because I don’t care for its taste, it has no appeal for me.

      1. I probably wouldn’t have made it all the way vegan if I hadn’t found some good “transition cheeses”

        Follow Your Own Heart
        go Veggie vegan

        And So Delicious made it easy for me.

        The funny past is that now I don’t use even the fake cheeses.

        The addiction spell was broken entirely and I didn’t even feel like I wasn’t having cheese.

        Invite them over for a vegan cheese tasting party and maybe they will jump ship.

  2. The USDA serves two missions: to promote agricultural products, including research efforts, and to promote the public health — providing, for example, eating guidelines such as the food pyramid or the healthy plate. Surprise, surprise, these guidelines are heavily influenced by the animal products industry — but not, it appears, by the farmers growing crops destined solely for human consumption. Which is one reason why, as I think Dr. Greger points out, the USDA guidelines suggest eating more veggies and fruit, which are whole foods, but less saturated fats and cholesterol, which are food components and found primarily in animal products, facts that are probably not obvious to the general public. I no longer trust anything the USDA recommends, and I’ve had doubts for a long time.

    I think it’s amazing to live in a country where the government pushes food that makes it’s population sick. But then, we have our medical industrial complex at the ready to make that same population slightly less sick. ka-ching, ka-ching.

    1. Big Pharma, American Medical Association, and Agribusiness (and even our government) are the farmers, we are their cattle. MOOO MOOO MOOO

    2. Kaching Kaching.
      I heard of a doctor who was let go from his job, for dispensing nutritional advice to diabetic patients whom required limb amputation.

      I’m not sure of the validity of the story, but it certainly wouldn’t surprise me at this point!

    3. Dr. J. I’m confused. You said that the guidelines are heavily influenced by the animal products industry, but the guidelines suggest eating more whole foods and less saturated fat. Isn’t that counter-productive for the animal products industry? I’m sure you’re making sense, but I would understand your comments better if you switched “more” and “less” in your first ¶ up there. Can you explain?

      1. Hi Dr Cobalt, I think Dr J is saying that the USDA refuses to say outright “eat less meat, poultry, eggs and dairy” (thereby pointing a finger directly at specific animal industries) and instead names components of animal products like saturated fat and salt and sugar . It’s left to the public to figure out the sources of sat fat, salt and sugar at the supermarket. Hopefully Dr J will correct me if I’m wrong. I really appreciated Dr Greger doing this video… it’s a sad comment on our governments.

        1. Governments support the corporations, which finance their re-election campaigns. …

          I gave up cheese 2-3 years ago because of Dr. Greger’s videos about cheese, and dairy too, of course. I refer this website to many people I train in workshops. Thank you, Dr. Greger!

          1. Peter McAlpine said, “… I gave up cheese 2-3 years ago because of Dr. Greger’s videos about cheese, and dairy too, of course. I refer this website to many people I train in workshops…”
            ————–

            Peter, I have noticed many people who understand their own risk with the standard American diet might have adopted a whole food, plant-based diet much earlier– but for a lingering addiction to cheese and cheese-based products..

            Aside from the probable casomorphin addiction, are there any other reasons people might it hard to leave cheese behind?

            What methods did you use, in your own case, that finally set you free from your casomorphin bonds?

    1. Yes, good point, how good or how bad is eating cheese. Dr. Greger slips up when he says that here in Europe cheese is more often consumed by better trained peopel. I can at least vouch for my own country (Netherlands, we are in the longevity subtop) and France that everyone at least eats cheese once daily or more.
      That said, the sad truth is that eating cheese has a far greater carbon footprint than eating sausage.

    2. Steve Weiss said, “Buuuut, you never actually answered the question… maybe tweak the headline?”
      ——————

      As Nancy points out, Dr. Greger gave the rest of us a “breather” from the constant bad news from researchers about dairy, and cheese, in particular. (For further research information, plunder through the massive video library with the term “dairy”.)

      The USDA today promotes a severe crisis in public health. Decades of lobbyists have steered USDA policy to underwrite, and advertise for, an morbidly obese dairy industry and its products– not the consumers whom the agency was chartered to represent.

      In fact, his reminder that our taxes still promote sales of disease-inducing foods could not be more relevant in this time of Washington corruption and crisis in public policy. Reform is long overdue at the USDA– we need government of, by and for the people actually to serve the people and their health.

    1. I was waiting for the evidence too. I was especially disappointed since the standard debate practice of slandering the messenger is usually employed when one has no evidence to refute the information being presented. Yeah I know listen to a thousand other NF videos that show that saturated fat etc. is harmful, blah, blah, blah….. It would have been nice to directly show your best evidence supporting your position that cheese is in fact bad for you….

      1. Dwight, how much more direct could hundreds of videos about saturated fat and its metabolic downstream effects be?

        Health research is not a contest of “he said, and she said” relativism and devious public relations, but actual science. When researchers identify a connection, they try to define and sharpen the data for that connection. If they cannot (yet), they declare a need for further research.

        Rather than wait for a “clash of titans” entertainment video pitting all industry claims against research, consider that Dr. Greger already has done most of the work, and with scientifically rigorous criticism. The rest is up to individual effort, the investment of time and effort to read (watch) through it.

        Many of us “binge-watch” several NF videos per day, following tributaries of interest.

      2. Here are some of the Cheese topics Dr Greger has already covered in blogs and videos:

        “Cheese may contain certain ingredients of concern, for example aluminum compounds, phosphorus, industrial pollutants, titanium dioxide, uric acid, and pus cells. In rare cases, cheese manufacturers use certain insects to give particular flavors and aromas to specific cheeses.

        In the United States, cheese is the number one source of saturated fat, and also contains trans fats. A high dietary saturated fat intake from foods like cheese and chicken is linked to periodontal disease. Lowering saturated fat intake may help reduce endotoxemia risk. Cheese intake has also been linked to lower sperm counts, higher inflammatory bowel disease risk, Parkinson’s disease, and cellulite formation. Eating sausage and cheese together can worsen arterial function within hours of consumption. Cheese is one of the top ten sodium contributors to the American diet and may have heterocyclic amines, a carcinogen normally connected with cooked meat, as well as putrescine. Consumers must be aware of misleading studies that suggest cheese and other foods high in saturated fat are not risky to our health.”

        Low saturated fat heals Diabetes and MS and lowers risk of stroke and heart attack.
        You can look up sodium and saturated fat on the website or read Dr. Barnard’s book.

          1. Doug,

            Yes, Ornish is doing low fat for heart and it works.

            Dr Barnard got rid of Diabetes getting rid of saturated fat.

            Dr Swank stopped the progression of 95% of MS patients getting rid of it.

            Not sure if they would have got the same results with low fat cheese. How low is low fat? Regular cheese is 80% fat.

            They would all say that if you are choosing to eat cheese go low fat, but there are things like sodium in it and hormones and aluminum and you have to make choices for your own health.

            1. Well I myself am convinced for now. I’m not really interested in eating cheese. And I seem to be doing well following Dr. Greger’s Daily Dozen and other suggestions in his book.

              My comment was just about this particular video and how it didn’t seem to make any case at all as to cheese being bad. I realize there are other references out there. I just wanted to point out that this video, and this blog entry, as is, left hanging there isn’t really one of Dr. Greger’s best. It doesn’t really make any conclusion at all. At best it just drops innuendos. I hope he modifies the video. Thanks.

                1. The full title of the video is, “Is Cheese Really Bad for You?”

                  The video criticizes the funding sources of the research. It gives alternate possibilities for why the research got neutral or positive results. But it doesn’t answer the question.

                  What more is there to the title of the video?

                  Look, I don’t think cheese is good for you. I don’t eat cheese. I’m trying to be WFPB, and having good success with that. My weight is down. My blood pressure is down. I’m looking forward to my next blood tests on 12/15 to see how my blood sugar has changed. I love the book, and have gifted it to friends and family.

                  All I’m saying is that this one video, in my opinion, is lacking.

                  1. I apologise.

                    I was looking at the NutritionFacts landing page which shows an extended title that makes much more sense given the contents of the video. However, you are absolutely right – on this page, only the short titlr is used and that is misleading..

                  2. Doug,

                    Congratulations on the good results!

                    Yes, he didn’t do a full enough answer in this video. It is part of a series and we will have to have patience for the answer to come.

                    He is actually trying to help those of us who get bombarded with people who are using the studies he mentioned.

                    Most of my friends are Keto and would defend cheese and would think Dr. Greger is a con artist for saying otherwise, but one of them had a heart attack and has cancer and another had a father who lost weight on Keto and died of a heart attack and I have relatives who are skinny mini from Keto who had strokes, but they don’t associate their diets with health problems because of their version of science.

                    1. It is fascinating how people make such contrasting choices in foods. So many

                      people are afraid of carbohydrates, fearful of weight gain probably but they

                      do not understand bad carbs versus healthy ones. There are so many health

                      problems associated with high protein high fat like keto yet people buy into

                      it. They focus on weight loss but suffer the consequences. Years ago I had a

                      friend on the atkins diet, she ate tons of fat and protein. One day I saw her

                      in the supermarket eating a loaf of Italian bread like she was starving; surely

                      her body was craving carbohydrates. We all make our own choices.

                      I believe people who try vegan and fail are still detoxing from their

                      animal-based meals, and also consume less than healthy vegan meals. For some

                      people it is a shock to eat without animal fats and proteins. namaste’, rachel

                    2. It depends on what you mean by fail. For many of us, we switched to whole foods plant-based not only for health, but because we really also want to lose weight.

                      If by fail you mean some people don’t lose weight it’s because you can still eat too many calories with this way of eating.

                      I myself am losing weight. But I am also logging all my calories with MyFitnessPal, including eating calories and exercise calories. If I don’t do that, it’s very easy to overdo it on the starches or nuts and eat too many calories.

    1. Larry, it is not a bad link. That is a link to the next video , and it will be released on this coming Monday if I am not mistaken. The link will be in effect at that time. Fridays are now flashback fridays where we are taking a new look at older videos (with fresh comments added)

  3. “It would have been nice to directly show your best evidence supporting your position that cheese is in fact bad for you….” Lets hear it! What are the studies on the upper income level cheese eaters in Europe. Do they eat enough other good food to offset the negatives. Is cheese really bad because large amounts of lower quality cheese is consumed by lower income groups? Is Cheesewhiz actually a non dairy product?

    1. Cheesewhiz does contain dairy: Ingredients: Whey, Milk, Canola Oil, Maltodextrin, Milk Protein Concentrate, Sodium Phosphate, Contains Less Than 2% Of Modified Food Starch, Salt, Lactic Acid, Whey Protein Concentrate, Mustard Flour, Worcestershire Sauce (Vinegar, Molasses, Corn Syrup, Water, Salt, Caramel Color, Garlic Powder, Sugar, Spices (Contains Celery), Tamarind, Natural Flavor), Sodium Alginate, Sorbic Acid As A Preservative, Color Added, Cheese Culture, Enzymes, Natural Flavor[3]

    2. Thiis is still my (unanswered) point exactly. Here in Europe good quality cheese is on the daily menu for rich as well as poor. I must admit that poor Europeans will add cheeseburgers and pizza’s, but then this is about white flour, acrylamides, fried fats, high salt etc.

  4. IMHO, I think there are so many things that relate to good health and longevity; diet, food portions, exercise, mental outlook on life, etc.
    Here is a great video from the Human Longevity Project. Very interesting…

  5. This is a great video, of course and I agree with some of the others. I was expecting 2 things – a discussion of how the studies were designed, ( due to the industry influence) eg: The ol’ high and low fat diet – 40 and 30% respectively, which is a deceiving trick, because truly, a lowfat diet is 10% fat – something along that line, And, then a bit of the science showing how bad the cheese is for us. How easy, between the saturated fat content and the pure unadulterated cancer promoting casein in it. I hope you are doing a series on this Dr. Greger. I sure could use it for a whole slew of clients, friends and relatives!

  6. If milk is bad then cheese is much worse especially aged ones(the more aged the worse) because cheese is more or less dehydrated/concentrated/ fermented(containing a lot of random molds) and salted milk… and it is certainly bad for at lest the digestive and respiratory tract of many many peoples and much more because of very complex casein than lactose.

  7. Thanks for the video, not at all surprising that industries do everything they can to manipulate the public to promote sales (by funding studies and other means), and, that the USDA wants to increase consumption of unhealthy animal products of all kinds. Does anyone have an interest in suing the USDA for promoting disease-causing dairy and meat?. The facts involved would certainly raise the public knowledge of where the USDA’s loyalty lies, where our tax dollars are wasted, and the truth about what is or is not healthy. I am all in. I, like most vegans, grew up in a home that consumed mat and dairy products as if they are normal, natural and necessary. I call it deliberate brainwashing to make people sick. namaste’, rachel

    1. I am not American but the problem appears to be not so much the USDA itself but the legislation determining what it does and how it can do it. That and the people appointed to run the USDA. Presumably these two factors are the responsibility of the President and the Congress.

      In the circumstances, I have always been surprised at how good a job the USDA does in allowing nutritional science to influence its guidelines. Sure they are not perfect but they seem to be less influenced by the meat and dairy industries than the Australian guidelines. The two say more or less the same thing – the scientific evidence can’t be ignored – but it is how it is presented that is key.
      http://www.health.gov.au/internet/main/publishing.nsf/Content/health-pubhlth-strateg-food-resources.htm

      Perhaps this isn’t altogether surprising. The Australian dietary guidelines working committee included a member appointed by the Australian Food and Grocery Council (ie a representative of the food industry). He replaced a ‘food and nutrition consultant’ who just so happened to have previously been head of the Australian Food and Grocery Council for five years.
      https://www.eatforhealth.gov.au/sites/default/files/files/the_guidelines/n55_australian_dietary_guidelines.pdf

      In an imperfect world, the USDA’s dietary guidelines aren’t too bad – as long as you can read between the lines.

      1. Interesting, Fumblefingers. So it’s also political in Australia, with a revolving door between government & food industry reps just like in the US.

  8. Markers of dairy fat consumption linked to lower risk of type 2 diabetes | Tufts Now

    https://now.tufts.edu/news-releases/markers-dairy-fat-consumption-linked-lower-risk-type-2-diabetes

    New Study: Saturated fats in dairy do NOT increase the risk of heart disease.

    Saturated fats in yoghurt, cheese and butter do NOT increase the risk of heart disease – and may actually prevent a stroke.

    *Eating full-fat dairy actually reduces the risk of dying from stroke by 42%
    *Low or no fat often contain high amounts of sugar, which drives heart disease

    This comes after research released earlier this month suggested saturated fats found in yoghurt, cheese, butter and milk do not increase the risk of heart disease,.
    Eating full-fat dairy actually reduces the risk of dying from stroke by 42 percent, a study found.

    Lead author Dr Marcia Otto, from the University of Texas, Houston, said: ‘Our findings not only support, but also significantly strengthen, the growing body of evidence which suggests that dairy fat, contrary to popular belief, does not increase risk of heart disease or overall mortality in older adults.

    ‘In addition to not contributing to death, the results suggest that one fatty acid present in dairy may lower risk of death from cardiovascular disease, particularly from stroke.’

    Dr Otto said: ‘Consistent with previous findings, our results highlight the need to revisit current dietary guidance on whole-fat dairy foods, which are rich sources of nutrients such as calcium and potassium.

    ‘These are essential for health not only during childhood but throughout life, particularly also in later years when undernourishment and conditions like osteoporosis are more common

    ‘Consumers have been exposed to so much different and conflicting information about diet, particularly in relation to fats.

    ‘It’s therefore important to have robust studies, so people can make more balanced and informed choices based on scientific fact rather than hearsay.’

    https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/advance-article/doi/10.1093/ajcn/nqy117/5052139

    1. Poor old Greg. Always naively falling for carefully designed studies that promote industry interests.

      Yes, looking at associations between individual dairy fats and cardiovascular disease will find no link. Just as associations between saturated fat consumption and heart disease findno link. Everybody knows they won’t. This is because it depends what is eaten in place of the dairy and satuurated fats. In the US and other Western countries this likely to be burgers, suasages,meat, refined carbs and junk food gennerally. All this kind of study proves is that dairy is no worse than meat, processed foods etc.

      To find out whether dairy is actually healthy or harmless, we need to examine what happens when dairy is replaced by other foods:

      ‘What did predict risk of cardiovascular disease was “fat swapping.” When dairy fat was replaced with the same number of calories from vegetable fat or polyunsaturated fat, the risk of cardiovascular disease dropped by 10% and 24%, respectively. Furthermore, replacing the same number of calories from dairy fat with healthful carbohydrates from whole grains was associated with a 28% lower risk of cardiovascular disease.

      Replacing dairy fat with other types of animal fat, such as from red meat, predicted a modest 6% higher risk of cardiovascular disease.’
      https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/2016/10/25/dairy-fat-cardiovascular-disease-risk/

      So, yes Greg. Dairy appears to be not so harmful in the diet as meat. Hmmm, there must be an industry funded study or ten which could spin this into media releases that say dairy is healthful And I am sure that you will bring them to our attention, Greg, as you do other industry funded studies which use simila techniques to present meat, diary and egg consumption in a positive light.

    2. How sad that businesses will lie and mislead people to sell their products. People get sick

      from animal saturated fats and cholesterols; major diseases result. You would have to

      conclude that between the USDA supporting animal ag through taxpayer subsidies ($38

      Billion dollars a year), checkoff programs for advertising support of animal ag meat/dairy/eggs/fish, Support of rBGH and many otherdrugs, GMO’s fed to farm animals, added hormones/growth stimulants/gene manipulation of farm animals, anti-gag laws, allowing animal ag to basically do anything and everything cruel to the animals, feeding farm animals rendered proteins (from dead/diseased/dismembered farm animals), fish meal, feather meal, tallow, and recycled animal poop, the U.S. Government is clearly focused on making people sick and reducing the population. Follow the money and you will see where their loyalty lies. namaste’, rachel

  9. I’m a committed Gregerian for the past year. My levels are great, and even my resistant blood pressure numbers have dropped to normal levels (after 7 months). In short, this website and Dr. Greger are godsends to me.

    But I’m a law professor, too, and Dr. Greger should heed the same advice that every rhetorician must. Make your affirmative case first: Yes, cheese is bad for you.

    Only then do you take shots at opposing views.

    1. Yeah but he is neither a rhetorician nor a lawyer. He want to stick to what the scientific evidence shows.

      There are so many carefully designed (loaded) studies out tehre funded by the industry that deliberately muddy the waters. Perhaps we only have to look at Greg’s post above for an example. The abstract doesn’t disclosethe funding source for this study but I think the lead author is from the the University of Texas.

      As a result, the vast number of conflicting studies prevent an overwhelming case being made. However, it is pretty telling that US, UK , Australian guidelines all advise that if dairy is consumed it should preferably be low fat dairy. Given the cheese is essentially solid fat, it is fairly clear I think that it isn’t good for us.

  10. Off-topic…

    Does anyone have any solid research on introducing raw veggies to a 1 yr old baby (specifically raw onions and peppers)?
    What age could my baby’s stomach and intestinal tract effectively break down these without causing more harm than good?

    Thanks!
    Ana

    1. Ana, the holistic pediatrician I work with thinks raw veggies for a baby that age a bad idea.
      He says the only food he recommends till they have a fair amount of teeth is breast milk.
      Then you can start adding -cooked- mild tasting vegetables, cooked soft so they don’t choke on them.
      Some soft fruits, like mashed banana ok also.
      Choking on food is a real problem with small children.
      I can’t imagine a small child actually liking onions and peppers. Those vegetables have such a strong taste.
      As a mother of four, I did follow his advice.

      1. Marilyn, thank you for your incite and suggestions. My baby actually did like minced onions and peppers in the quinoa I made for him. I wasn’t concerned about choking since they were minced. More of the digestive aspect

  11. Thank you. I am looking forward to your interpretation on the Chinese study of 500,000 people on egg consumption and reported in JAMA.

  12. What’s the difference between saturated fat in cheese and sat-fat in nuts or oils?
    Many “vegan” _products_ (not necessarily foods) contain 0.5 to 3 or even 8g of sat-fat (e.g. vegan butter alternative spreadable stuff.)
    While to our family, vegan means “grown in dirt with water and sunlight” we make all kinds of compromises to western diet and lifestyle while strictly avoiding animal fat and animal protein … a little saturated fat can be found on the “Nutrition Facts” label in some items (vegan yoghurt, vegan butter) so I try to minimize or avoid these food products as much as possible, still I wonder if all occurences of saturated fat in food is the same.
    If all sat fat is bad, does the Daily Dozen include any sat fat?
    Thanks as ever!

    1. One difference is the “package” it comes in.
      SF in cheese comes with casein, pus, hormones, and all the other deleterious crap in cheese that make eating it harmful.
      SF in walnuts comes with polyphenols, antioxidants, etc. that make eating walnuts healthy.

      1. Casper Gomez — thank you for the reply and the humbling expectation that I might understand it! : )
        I’m trying to isolate a specific red-light or green-light on whether eating saturated fats in specific foods is healthful.
        I had — apparently wrongly — taken it to mean that the “fat” in plant foods is the polyunsaturated and monounsaturated and omega-3 … but now I see “saturated fat” and “vegan” on the same (product) label and even on the nutrition facts label of a plain bag of nuts … so it’s conflicting (eat nuts for a healthy daily dozen … don’t eat any saturated fat.)
        There’s data aplenty on the benefits of eating a walnut compared to a peanut or eating a few pistachios to aid sleep, but I don’t see any data at all on whether the saturated fat in plants is unlike the “it just plain kills you” saturated fat in animal products (meat and dairy.)
        When I saw the video stating “the allowable limit of saturated fat is zero; any amount of saturated fat is directly linked to disease” I went to the kitchen and started to isolate anything with saturated fat on the label. Even a bag of raw almonds … where would I be without walnuts and almonds? (answer: dead in the forest somewhere, with a suicide note “there’s only so much leafy green salad one man can eat in a lifetime” … : )
        The funny thing is, since 2010, my family has made the transition to 100% plants and there’s no complaints. We really don’t miss a thing. The thought of eating a killed animal was the last straw. But when I look at the foods we enjoy (vegan butter on whole wheat flaxseed toast in the morning for example) I found the kitchen was laced with a gram of saturated fat in numerous “products” and I don’t see a way around it. Unless you eat a leafy green salad with a lavish salad dressing of … water … : ) . I’m sure we _should_ be willing to enjoy a mustard instead of a Caesar (I do prefer a mustard dressing) and there’s two remaining adversaries in the kitchen: salt and sugar (of course, damn hard to avoid, but at least harmless at the very low levels in a vegan diet) but this new (to me) adversary of saturated fat … I thought I was free and clear of worrying about fat when we took all animal fat and we eat zero cholesterol, but here we have this insidious saturated fat in plants, oils and a nuts which causes bad cholesterol levels to rise … far out!
        So I need the data and a plan of action.

        1. You don’t have to give up nuts. Watch Dr Gregers nuts videos.

          Try to give up the oils. You can watch videos on their effects on the endothelials on this site, too.

        2. consider this:

          roughly 400 calories of Walnuts:
          4g SF
          ZERO Chol
          4g Fiber
          anti-cancer

          roughly 400 of a Bubba patty:
          12g SF
          35% Chol
          ZERO Fiber
          cancer-promoting

          Walnuts are very a fatty plant food overall, and this is why Esselstyn avoids/limits nuts/seeds for severe CVD patients. Earth Balance has about 3.5g SF per TBSP which is very high, and made of Oils which are not good.

          The way I look at it, if your overall diet and Blood test numbers are great (ex: TBC: 150, A1C: 5%, etc), then Earth Balance on the weekend isn’t going to matter much. Nuts and Seeds are excellent (within reason) for those healthy people following a plant-based lifestyle.

          For me, one of the best, easiest, nearly tasteless ways to get healthy fats (to aid in ADEK absorption) and also has a very high Fiber ratio is our beloved superstar: Chia Seeds.

    2. Hi,

      Yes, the difference lies in what’s with the saturated fat. When we eat these foods, we are not eating solely saturated fat, we are eating a whole food that has more macronutrients and micronutrients. Saturated fats in nuts is accompanied with carbohydrates, antioxidants and fiber while saturated fats in milk or other sources are accompanied with carbohydrates and no antioxidants. The link between this two foods is this: it has been found a good correlation with consumption of nuts and heart disease. People eating nuts gets a lower probability of a heart disease. The opposite is for the other food, specially red meat. It has been found more mortality in people eating saturated fats in animal sources.

      It is also to note that is highly difficult to eat the same amount of saturated fats in nuts unless you eat a cup a day. Most people can’t eat it because it’s too much for the body.

      I hope this solves your doubt.

      Yared, Health Support Volunteer

  13. Brilliant video. But let me consider for a moment the feelings of all those desperate dairy industry trolls out there who even regularly visit this site when anything to do with dairy is brought up and often in between… This must be really stressful for you guys… yet more of that annoying light shed on your industry. So to all the readers here who appreciate evidence-based facts and like me, get annoyed at those who shamelessly promote false information for sake of agenda, remember how difficult this must be for them and maybe extend a word of kindness, just a “there, there” or something along those lines. Poor guys must be getting tuckered out by now.

    1. Uh huh… who funded the study? And it didn’t compare heart health to fermented dairy intake, it compared the differences between those eating fermented dairy vs. those eating non-fermented dairy. That’s like saying coconut oil is good for the heart because compared to butter, it’s better.

  14. I follow a couple of science based nutritional authors and one of them is Dr. Gabe Mirkin (besides Dr. Gregory). A quote from his website on the subject: “Milk, butter and cream contain large amounts of the pro-inflammatory sugar, galactose, while aged cheeses and yogurt contain almost no galactose because fermentation destroys the galactose, which appears to make fermented dairy products healthful (Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases, May 21, 2018)”.

    There are other similar findings he has publicized that suggest there is a difference on the health impacts of fermented dairy products versus other dairy products. I would love to see this issue addressed more directly by Dr. Gregory.

  15. Wish I had known that candy was so good for us before I gave it up.

    Thanks for doing this cheesy video.

    It took me a long time to watch it because I fell and hit my head this morning, but that comment went in the beet section.

  16. I don’t get how research papers are peer reviewed prior to publication but the ‘No conflict’ statements are allowed to remain, if false or questionable.

  17. While I’m not eating cheese, that new video doesn’t exactly show a negative effect of cheese, does it? It just points out that the studies were funded by dairy interests, and pointed out that there were other correlations that could explain the positive result (i.e. higher socio-economic status). But higher socio-economic status also explains why we got ourselves in the current state of things by eating too much sugar and meats, etc. So I would have to say that this is not one of Dr. Greger’s most convincing videos (and I am a fan of his).

    Feel free to correct me and tell me what I’m missing here.

    1. Doug,

      He is building on an argument. Dr. Barnard wrote a whole book on The Cheese Trap and probably could have written more. Dr. Greger is trying to help people who are confused that the evidence is: Dairy increases all-cause mortality, followed by industry studies saying the opposite.

      He is trying to explain WHY that happens. Without understanding that part people get confused and don’t know who to believe at all.

      If you have waded through the evidence, which I did recently, it is such a mental tug of war. You will die faster, live longer, die faster, live longer, die faster, live longer, die faster, live longer, DIEfasterLIVElongerDIEFASTERLIVELONGER-D_I_E_F_A_S_T_E_Rl-i-v-e-l-o-n-g-e-r. I could keep saying it because THAT is what science really says about cheese and that is his point.

        1. Doug,

          He says that two more videos are coming and he also did post two of his saturated fat links.

          The other links I would look at are his sodium videos.

          1. And we should all know by now how horribly constipating cheese is, scientific study or not.

            Warning* this next sentence is disgusting… back when I used to eat cheese, I remember getting sick a few hours after I had eaten homemade nachos using real cheddar that I had melted myself in the microwave… well, my illness lead to vomiting and… the cheese I had eaten in a soft and melted state and thoroughly chewed along with the rest of that meal, came up completely solid, like a big block of solid cheese… that was one of my grossest experiences in my life and I took it as evidence that our bodies just do not break the stuff down properly.

  18. Oh man,that picture makes me crave cheese unexpectedly even though I haven’t had any in about 10yrs,does anybody know any healthy vegan alternatives,I don’t like nutritional yeast, I eat it but only when mixed in with peanut butter to mask the taste. My favourite cheeses were Gouda,cheddar and emmental.was never that big on mouldy cheese

      1. There are some brands of faux cheeses which aren’t all that bad.

        I have used several brands and hated Daiya because I felt like it had a strange taste to it. Whole Foods used it on their vegan pizza and I tried it before trying other brands and hated it.

        I did not hate at all:

        Follow Your Heart
        So Delicious
        Go Veggie (Vegan – watch out they put the lactose-free version in the vegan section)

        (But I did switch off of all of them and don’t mind nutritional yeast.)

        1. Deb, you can make cheese substitutes at home — I have recipes, though I haven’t tried them. I tend to avoid industrial faux cheese products since they are highly processed, and I don’t like all their ingredients. Also, I don’t feel the need for fake meats and other fake animal products: my plant foods prepared in my kitchen from mostly whole ingredients are quite tasty and satisfying!! I feel no need for anything else.

        2. Deb, I hated daiya too! All the vegan pizzas use daiya. I eat whole foods mostly but one of these days I really want to try Miyoko’s mozzarella to make a vegan pizza… so far their company has never disappointed so I’m guessing it will taste amazing, plus I heard great things. I love that Miyoko’s doesn’t use palm oil which is a must for me for moral and ethical reasons along with health concerns.

    1. MPE, I am a live food vegan, you can try some cashew cheeses sold at better health food stores

      or make your own raw cashew cheese (or almond cheese), there are plenty of recipes available, most use raw soaked cashews, vinegar and spices…namaste’, rachel

    2. E, it’s not exactly whole foods but if you’re craving some cheese, miyoko’s makes some AMAZING cheese alternatives!! Check them out. They’re great for the holidays with some healthier crackers… I like Two Mom’s raw whole foods crackers and Mary’s Gone Crackers all seed crackers (I just which they didn’t have added salt). Chao makes really good vegan cheese slices and there’s another brand out similar to their ingredients I’ve been seeing at Whole Foods and other health foods stores who also fortifies their’s with B12 and they make a vegan block of parmesan, too. For a whole foods plant based cheese, you’d probably have to make your own but there’s a lot of recipes out there. For some AMAZING alfredo, I highly recommend this recipe: https://thevegan8.com/2013/12/28/vegan-garlic-alfredo-sauce/ BUT I go by her old recipe which calls for 1/4th cup plus 1 tbsp of nutritional yeast and only 1 tbsp of lemon, I’m not sure why she tweaked it as it was perfect but considering she’s now saying the nutritional yeast is optional, that might work better for you. However, you might like the nutritional yeast in the recipe even if you don’t like it straight. Oh, and have you tried UNFORTIFIED nutritional yeast? It tastes so much better… there’s a SLIGHT vitamin-y taste to the fortified ones but beware because some claim to be unfortified yet they aren’t truly–the folic acid content making that evident. I use Sari nutritional yeast, it’s amazing.

      1. Thanks guys,the nutritional yeast available here is unfortified, I’m in the EU so I might not be able to get those brands, but i’ll keep an eye out. Tried cashew cheese but it doesn’t taste like solid cheese to me (cheddar. .. ) it has a tiny bit of nutritional yeast in it which I couldn’t sense,about half of this cashew cheese was coconut oil though

  19. Wow! I can not believe that the very people tasked to protect the welfare of people are also the very ones destroying us; using our own hard earned money at that. Wah!

    1. Nanette,

      Have you watched the documentary, “What the Health?”

      I recommend it highly.

      It is a little depressing, but it is eye-opening because it isn’t just one group you could say that exact sentence about.

      I feel like it should be mandatory viewing.

  20. This video seems just like a restate of what we already know. Just follow the money of who funded the “research”. Nothing new in that information.

    1. cp, I completely disagree… He shed some incredible light on the lengths they go to in order to purposefully mislead the public and go by fake science. SUCH an important video.

  21. interesting, the dairy and egg or meat industries keep trying to gain popularity in these studies, so the vegetable industry just doesnt have enough power to fight back? its basically all business to me, vegetables and meats or w/e are just fighting for studies to sell their products. its interesting though this guy only concentrates on those dairy meat people influencing studies even though lots of studies about vegetables i read were sponsored by vegetable companies.

    1. Josh, if you are referring to Dr Greger re only refering to dairy and meat people influencing studies, you are mistake. Having watch hundreds of videos over the years, I can say that Dr Greger has been quick to mention ANY industry sponsored studies that are featured (and sources are listed below each video.) I think it is one of the great features of this site that a person not only gets up to date nutritional info, but also an education on statistics as well as so many of the factors that influence our food environment. (be they political, financial, or scientific in nature) I remember one quite funny video to me about prunes, errmm, “dried plums”. If the vegie, fruit or nut people sponsor studies, Dr G says so right up front.

      1. Barb, another good point! :-) There are always reasons for things. Maybe the Universe (via your comment) is telling me to start eating prunes again — in lieu of the other dried fruits, maybe? Am wondering if they should be taken dried, or plumped up with water for best effects. Or if it even matters.

        “Over my career, I have tested numerous fruits, including figs, dates, strawberries and raisins, and none of them come anywhere close to having the effect on bone density that dried plums, or prunes, have,” said Bahram H. Arjmandi, Florida State’s Margaret A. Sitton Professor and chairman of the Department of Nutrition, Food and Exercise Sciences in the College of Human Sciences. “All fruits and vegetables have a positive effect on nutrition, but in terms of bone health, this particular food is exceptional.”

        https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/08/110818093048.htm

    2. Not a good point at all considering as Barb points out, he always mentions when a study is funded by an industry whether it’s big dairy or a pomegranate juice industry. Seems like you haven’t been paying attention. Dr. Greger has actually put the red light on certain plant foods and gets pretty angry (or at least that’s what I sense from him) when unhealthy plant foods are pushed with propaganda and the science is ignored. But in any case, let’s get real here… kale is not a multi-billion dollar industry which has had a history of and presently still influences government in major ways. Animal agriculture has long been a ruling factor in this country and so much of the world and is so powerful that once again, it has major influence on government. They are so low as to create lawsuits, like how the despicable egg industry tried to sue and put Hampton Creek (makers of Just Mayo and other incredible products) out of business for simply being an exquisite EGG FREE alternative to other mayonnaise products. So you can philosophize.. “WOULD ‘big kale’ be as low and underhanded if they NEEDED to be, if the science wasn’t actually, legitimately on their side?” I mean… you COULD philosophize about that, but since they don’t have the power, money (because they’re NOT big money and you can grow produce in your back yard or even in your house or even in a jar in your pantry), or need (because the science is so abundantly on the side of kale, beans, apples, etc.), I guess we’d never know that pointless imagined scenario’s outcome.
      But I would instead philosophize this… it makes sense… it makes perfect sense that an industry such as dairy or such as eggs or such as meat and so on who don’t care AT ALL about the literal holocaust of the animals their businesses run on, wouldn’t care at all about the public’s health or the environment or starving people in third world countries affected by animal agriculture or would be willing to trick and lie and lie and trick…

      Common sense is a lost art but it never lost its value.

  22. My dog likes baby food!

    This is a game changer!

    So far he has has broccoli, spinach, peas, carrots, sweet potatoes, green beans and couscous.

    It keeps him closer to mimicking fasting and he can do this for a few weeks.

    Hooray! This is a praise God moment for me. He and I are friends again. He is happy and I am happy and he looks pretty good!

    1. Deb, I broke my jaw (in two places! from a bike fall) while I was in college, and I ate baby food when I went hiking and camping. I’m guessing it’s better now, but I lost a lot of weight, fast! (since I was already thin, I became gaunt and skeletal), and I recall being hungry a lot! Blenders weren’t a common item back then; it was hard to find one for the dorm cafeteria — and yuck! Imagine eating that food pureed! I’m glad that your dog is eating.

      1. Ouch, Dr. J., a broken jaw must have hurt like hell! What a way to louse up your life! :-(

        When I was a kid I went bike riding in the country…by myself….and while going down a steep hill, I fell head over the handlebars. Nobody wore helmets in those days. My skull must be made of steel, because the worst I ever got out of that episode was a headache later on. For all I know, I might also have had a concussion, but I never told my family about it, so it wasn’t checked out. Maybe that’s why I’m a bit of a wackadoodle? :-)

        I climbed to the top of our backyard weeping willow tree one time and fell almost to the bottom. A larger branch caught my fall, so I didn’t touch the ground. More ouch. Never told anybody about that either; thought they wouldn’t let me climb it anymore.

  23. I have a question about sugar.
    People say that sugar makes you fat, is that really true?
    I understand that fat can make you fat because it gets stored in our bodies.
    But what about sugar? Do sugar get stored in our bodies too?

    1. The people that say that are staunch proponents of high fat diets and//or low carb diets. They pretty much have to say that or their entire belief system starts to crumble.

      There are a number of reasons why people get fat. Some people have genetic problems but the main reason is too many calories. However, the evidence also suggests that fat is a major culprit eg

      ‘The study included 30 different diets that varied in their fat, carbohydrate (sugar) and protein contents. Mice of five different strains were fed these diets for 3 months, which is equivalent to 9 years in humans.

      In total, over 100,000 measurements were made of the mice’s body weight changes and their body fat was measured using a micro MRI machine. The result of this enormous study was unequivocal – the only thing that made the mice get fat was eating more fat in their diets. Carbohydrates, including up to 30% of calories coming from sugar, had no effect.’
      https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-07/caos-msi071318.php

      This shouldn’t be too surprising. After all, for many years researchers studying obesity using animal models have routinely fed test animals high fat diets to induce obesity
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diet-induced_obesity_model

      And Asians, famous for eating high carb diets for millennia, didn’t start becoming fat until the introduction of western-style high fat diets.

      That said, there is no good reason to include table sugar or other added sugars in our diet. It may increase the risk for fatty liver disease for one thing. Dr Greger suggests that zero added sugar may be optimal.
      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/how-much-added-sugar-is-too-much/

    2. Renan,

      Tom has given you a technical answer and you are using the word sugar.

      Some people on the Internet are teaching carbs as being sugar and would have you think potatoes will make you fat, but they will only make you fat if you fry them or put butter or cheese or other fatty toppings on them.

      Sugar gets metabolized by glycolysis and the Krebs cycle and much of the calories you are get burned up through those metabolic processes.

      BUT sugar meaning table sugar empty calories in soda and junk food most certainly does make you fat. It doesn’t add nutrition and people get addicted and over consume them.

      There were two girls who got conned by you won’t get fat adding sugar to everything and they did get fat adding sugar to everything they ate.

      Just don’t confuse the carbs in whole plant food with what will happen if you drink soda and eat candy all day.

      1. Renan,

        Watch a teaching on calorie density and you will see what foods will cause you to gain weight.

        Processed food is a “sugar” category which will cause you to gain weight. Fat is worse than that, but your Keto friends will tell you that they are less hungry. And they are because they got rid of refined processed flours and table sugar.

        While Food Plant Based eats filling foods like beans and potatoes and as many vegetables as you want until you get filled up on nutrition.

        Vegans can be fat on processed food or too many desserts and snacks.

    3. RenanDR,
      The simple answer is that any calories (from fat, sugar or protein) consumed over the amount you expend will be stored as fat in your body. One of the advantages of eating Whole Food Plant Based is that you are consuming these calories along with fiber, water, and nutrients that promote satiety, hormone balance, and metabolism. When you extract the calories in the form of sugar crystals or refined oil, you are getting just the calories without the other numerous benefits. Consuming these refined products with added sugars and oils leads to overconsumption of calories. Check out this link for more information on body weight management. https://nutritionfacts.org/2018/06/12/how-to-lose-weight-eating-more-food/

  24. I don’ think this is one of Dr. Greger’s better columns. It’s one of those “guilt by association” things, but really lacking in solid evidence that cheese consumption at any level is harmful to the health. In fact, Dr. G points in passing comment to one study that shows that cheese eaters do very well, thank you, and brushes it off by asserting that the subjects in the study came from a privileged societal sector. I’m left wondering then whether if I, as a member of such a societal group, shouldn’t just eat cheese, because the combination of being somewhat economically privileged and eating cheese does seem to lead to longer life expectancy or some other desirable outcome. Where’s the evidence that the composition of a typical cheese, or of any particular cheese, is deleterious in terms of a health outcome?

    1. Bro… are you being serious Theo? LOL
      CASEIN protein ALONE, has cancer-promoting affects. Have you not heard of IGF-1?
      That, along with the high levels of Saturated Fat should be enough for you to stop eating the crap.

    2. The reasoning is fairly simple. Cheese is high in fat and almost all of it is saturated fat.

      Saturated fat increases LDL cholesterol whch is a key risk factor cardiovascular disease. When saturated fat is replaced by other types of fat (except trans fat), cardiovascular mortality goes down. perhaps this is why US, UK and Australian guidelines all say that if people eat dairy foods, they should eat low fat dairy. I would say here that cheese is pretty much the definition of high fat dairy.

      And then there is this Harvard study:(which I feel like I have posted a million times)

      “What did predict risk of cardiovascular disease was “fat swapping.” When dairy fat was replaced with the same number of calories from vegetable fat or polyunsaturated fat, the risk of cardiovascular disease dropped by 10% and 24%, respectively. Furthermore, replacing the same number of calories from dairy fat with healthful carbohydrates from whole grains was associated with a 28% lower risk of cardiovascular disease.”
      https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/2016/10/25/dairy-fat-cardiovascular-disease-risk/

      But, yes, there is apparently no direct experimental evidence that cheese is bad for us.

    1. A bit of topic your question, but now you mention it, I would also like to know why the skin of my hands crack (and not the skin of my face, which is also exposed to cold)as soon as the temperature drops below 3 degrees Celsius and, if there is a remedy from the inside, other than applying those sticky fatty ointments, I hate them.
      On topic, thanks dr. Gregor for your enlightening (like this one) and other lifechanging video’s, since about 6 months since I came across this site, I eat lots of your recommended veggies, herbs, fruits, and much less meat and eggs. And I know nutrition- facts bank account:-)

  25. I just had someone leave a bawling their head off voice mail about their insurance and deductible going up over 177% from last year.

    They get too much deducted from their pay check before that change and can’t afford the copays or the multi-thousand dollar deductible or to have the monthly bill deducted from their paycheck.

    It isn’t the first time I have had someone crying about insurance.

    Insurance goes up every year but their company hasn’t given raises in 6 years.

  26. I ended up talking with my friend about doing at least one month of WFPB no oil as a health intervention.

    She told me that she hasn’t gone to any doctor and has been off her Diabetes meds for 2 years even though her employer is paying into insurance and she is also getting a few hundred taken out of each paycheck. She was frustrated because thousands of dollars are going toward medical for her, but she can’t actually afford to go to a doctor and can’t afford the testing supplies, co-pays, or deductibles and can’t afford to live off the paycheck being reduced by having medical deducted.

    We strategized and she switched to an infinitely higher deductible, since she doesn’t go at all, it will give her money to pay her water, which got shut off today.

    She has needed surgery for a few years but can’t get that either. Honestly, I already had given her How Not To Die and the cookbook and it is a snow storm and I told her, you can reverse your Diabetes in a few weeks.

    She has no choice but to opt out of all medical, but we talked about things like buying frozen fruits and veggies to make it cheaper.

    I might have a convert and I can thank the insurance system!

    1. The working class people have already gotten rid of cable and Internet and land lines and stopped going out to eat or going to the movies or going on vacations. They already hang up their clothes instead of using electricity and they already keep their heat at 60 and they still can’t afford medical and insurance and taxes.

      1. Fixed income – elderly, single mothers, people on disability and working class are the ones who I aim at.

        They can’t afford anything except WFPB. They can’t.

  27. Dr Greger,

    I am gathering people and whether you like it or not, you are going to be the closest thing to a doctor they have. I appreciate that you exist.

  28. I used reverse psychology.

    I told her that she could reverse her Diabetes with water fasting and then gave the science and she said, “Can’t I do something like vegetarian?”

    If you start with vegan that is much too restrictive, but if you start with water fasting and move to calorie restriction might work or you could do no oil vegan and eat things like beans and lentils and barley and oatmeal and rice and potato and as many servings of fruits and vegetables as you want, suddenly, vegan is not restrictive at all.

    It is so much better than water fasting.

  29. Okay guys and gals I need some help here. This is the ONLY way I’ve found so far to contact Dr. Greger or anyone near him. I have to tell a brief story first:

    I watched Forks Over Knives around 6 or 7 years ago and drastically changed my diet. Do I follow it 100%? No but I get as close as I possibly can without losing my mind. Dr. Greger and the FOK people are pretty well aligned in their beliefs (and the proof they provide to use to support those beliefs). Fast forward to now and my weight is about the same (down 10 pounds and then froze) and my blood vessels around my heart are a little worse off. A recent nuclear stress test puts me at 70% blockage in a couple of my lower arteries (or veins, ventricles, whatever?) around my heart. I finally gave in and went on the statins doctors have been begging me to take for many years. I’m thinking since the diet change didn’t work, maybe my body needed a little help. I resisted for years because of what is written here and what the FOK docs say about them but I finally gave in. They’re looking at me for a couple of stents but are waiting to see if the statins help first. My symptom is angina (tightening of upper chest and throat but it only shows up within a couple hours after eating which is odd). After 6 months on the statins, it’s getting better.

    Rewind to 6 or 7 years ago: I gave up one of my favorite foods . . . eggs. I still eat them but I’m down from 7 or 8 a week to 1 every two weeks. An online magazine I consider reputable just ran this:

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/nutrition/20-reasons-to-start-your-morning-with-eggs/ss-BBOaxFx?ocid=spartandhp

    It’s the “Eat This Not That” people and now they’re saying it’s okay to eat eggs and are saying all sorts of positive things that I’m sure Dr. Greger will soon shred this but they site their sources and it’s really making me wonder. Can he really shred them this time?

    I’ve given up so much already – this is starting to look like my lifelong battle against my weight where nothing I try works even long term and even if I DON’T GO BACK. A friend just went in for a stent or two and came out 2 weeks later with a heart attack on the table and double bypass. The hospital told him they do as many vegans as they do carnivores. He asked because of me always trying to get him to eat better. They say it’s heredity (yes I’m aware how vegans can still eat poorly and I’m aware of “fat veganism”). I eat 100 times better than he does and I’m not far behind him for my turn on the table it seems.

    I don’t want to die early like my parents and both my brothers who didn’t make it to their 60th birthday but hell I don’t want to live in constant fear either. I need a little help here and while I welcome the comments that will follow I would REALLY like to hear from Dr. Greger or his immediate peers on this matter.

    Thanks.

    1. Hi, I have learned so much about every aspect of veganism since I became vegan in 1987.

      At times I have taken a hard line about the subject but that has softened. At times I have

      been very preachy and even judgemental about other people as well. I remind myself that I

      did not do this overnight, I eliminated what I considered “meat” several years before ’87 which

      was beef, and pig, but I still consumed chickens, eggs and dairy products. I was uninformed about

      the treatment of animals and their ultimate death; what was I thinking?.

      Everyone makes their own choices for food and those choices can be very emotional. The

      fact is that not all vegans are the same. There is a ton of processed food for sale, vegan and

      non-vegan. I do not see these foods, in cardboard boxes in freezers, as healthy. I like eating

      as low on the food chain as possible. The produce section in markets is where I believe we find

      health, plus whatever grains, beans, nuts and seeds in their whole form we consume. I happen

      to be a “live” food vegan where I eat 100% raw but I believe making as much as we can ourselves

      is healthiest. I personally believe consuming 50% of your foods in their raw form, like fruits and vegetables (salads, smoothies, juices, etcetera) is a great goal. Processed foods have ton of poor quality sodium and sometimes unhealthy fats in them.

      Not all vegans are the same, yet the title does not consider that we are different. I am amazed at the wide variety of what ‘vegan’ actually means. For some people it is being vegan most of the time but having non-vegan foods occasionally, for others it is relying on many vegan processed foods. Just being vegan does not guarantee health, it all depends on not only what nutrition you eat but also what

      your mental attitude is. If you feel you are depriving yourself and have cravings and need to

      reward yourself with eggs I would ask yourself, why?, and what do you get out of it. Of course you can eat whatever you choose as we all can. namaste’, rachel

  30. In my opinion Dr. Greger did very well by not making any conclusion. We can not say that the cheese is bad for our health or defiantly raise the rates of cardiovascular disease. For example, although the French eat about 20 kg per person per year, which is a huge amount compared to other countries , they have relatively low rates of heart disease and obesity. Furthermore, every one should not ignore that Fresh cheese are a very good source of good bacteria for our gut, which influence our immune system.

    Many thank

  31. The majority of calories in cheese is from fat; animal fat, which is the worst kind. It’s also loaded with cholesterol. All available evidence we have is that eating cheese increases your risk of an early death. “French Paradox?” Nope. The French suffer from cardiovascular disease as much as any other population eating a high fat diet. Dr. G covers it here:

    https://nutritionfacts.org/2018/05/22/what-about-the-french-paradox/

    I love cheese, but it’s not worth the risk, to me, so I don’t eat it. There are plenty of other nutritious foods that we know support health and not risky. Of course the level of risk you decide to take on is up to you.

    Dr. Ben

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