The Best Food for Fibroids

The Best Food for Fibroids
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Women with uterine fibroids should consider adding green tea to their daily diet, as a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled interventional trial suggests it may help as well as surgery.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

What about dietary phytochemicals as a possible preventive and therapeutic option for uterine fibroids, plant based compounds with disease-preventive properties, found in whole grains, fruits, vegetables, bean, split peas, chickpeas, and lentils, herbs, spices, nuts, and certain beverages. The thought is, look, we know they can help regulate the initiation, promotion, and spread of cancerous tumors; so, what about benign tumors like fibroids? Most anti-cancer drugs on the market now, for example, were originally derived from plants or plant products; so, why not try to use plants to target the inflammation or blood supply of fibroids? Might fibroids be a consequence of chronic inflammation within the body? Well, we know that women with fibroids are more likely to eat more beef and ham, and fewer fruits and green vegetables, but whole plant foods don’t just have anti-inflammatory effects but antioxidant effects as well. When the amount of free radicals exceeds the protective effects of antioxidants, oxidative damage will occur, which has been implicated in a variety of disease states, including gynecological conditions, such as fibroids.

If you collect fresh fibroids, as well as normal uterine tissue from hysterectomy surgeries, the fibroid cells have significantly fewer antioxidant enzymes; so, might antioxidant rich foods help? Well, if you drip some strawberries in a petri dish, you can apparently kill of some fibroid tumor cells, while leaving normal uterus cells alone. But, what good does that do us. That’s only relevant if we can show those strawberry compounds get absorbed through our gut and achieve high enough concentrations in uterine tissue. The same with curcumin, the component of the spice turmeric. One of its so-called “miraculous” properties is suppressing the growth of uterine fibroid cells, but again that was just in vitro. Yes, an inhibitory effect was found, and at concentrations that don’t compromise the growth of regular uterine tissue. But, my patients are people, not petri dishes.

I mean, it’s neat to see what happens to human fibroid cells as you drip higher and higher concentrations of green tea compounds on them in a test tube, but I care less about what happens in vitro, or in mice, whether or not they have any clothes on. But there were no randomized, controlled clinical studies until, now, or at least 2013.

Subjects were randomized to green tea extract or placebo for 4 months. In the placebo group, fibroid volume increased 24%. That’s what fibroids do, they continue to grow; however, those randomized to the green tea group showed a reduction in total fibroid volume, and not just by a little, a dramatic decrease—shrunk almost a third–a highly significant difference. OK. But, did the women feel any better? Yes, a dramatic decrease in symptom severity, as well. In the placebo group, nothing much happened month after month, but in those taking the same-looking pill that happened to contain green tea compounds inside, consistent improvement, with women feeling lessening symptoms, each month better than the last. And, with that, an improved health-related quality of life month after month, significantly better than control. And, their blood counts got better too. The blood levels kept decreasing in the placebo group with all that continued excess blood loss every month. But, blood counts reversed in the green tea group. So, anemia significantly improved, because average blood flow significantly diminished. And, all this—the fibroid shrinkage, less pain, better periods— with no adverse effects.

So, not only results comparable to those for the drugs that are commonly used—without the side effects, but comparable results to uterine artery embolization, where they try to cut the blood supply to the fibroid, which is great—unless you accidently cut the blood supply to the rest of the uterus and cause uterine necrosis, one of many reported major complications, which also include death, not only of the fibroid but of the patient and other potential complications that may arise from accidently clogging off non-target arteries. So, a side effect free solution as good as a more invasive procedure is potentially better than in my book. They conclude that green tea compounds show promise as a safe and effective therapeutic agent for women with symptomatic fibroids. Such a simple, inexpensive, and relatively safe therapy could improve women’s health globally.

Now, relatively safe doesn’t mean risk-free. Although there were no liver function abnormalities detected, this was a small study. If you give green tea extract pills to a thousand women for a year, like they did in this breast cancer trial, in about 1 in 17 women, their liver started to get inflamed, a few of which became serious. Now, the dose they used in this study was twice that of the fibroid study; and, it’s not completely clear if the pills were the only cause. But, in general, we should try to avoid extracts and get nutrition in foods as grown, or at least foods as grown dunked in hot water, like green tea. Now, they had to use pills in this study, because they wanted it to be a double-blind study, and it’s hard to create a fake placebo tea that looks, smells, and tastes like the real thing. So, I don’t think we should take green tea extract pills; we should drink green tea. The problem is that the dose they used was like 11 cups a day worth, which would be a lot of caffeine. But, you could choose decaf, and it’s not outside the realm of possibility to drink a couple quarts of tea a day, especially if it’s going to shrink your fibroids so much you can keep your uterus or something. Though, for all we know, five cups of tea would work or three cups or one cup a day—no other dose has been tested. But, you can test it in your own life. If you have fibroids, it couldn’t hurt to add a few cups of green tea to your daily diet and see if you start feeling better.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Kristina DeMuth. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

What about dietary phytochemicals as a possible preventive and therapeutic option for uterine fibroids, plant based compounds with disease-preventive properties, found in whole grains, fruits, vegetables, bean, split peas, chickpeas, and lentils, herbs, spices, nuts, and certain beverages. The thought is, look, we know they can help regulate the initiation, promotion, and spread of cancerous tumors; so, what about benign tumors like fibroids? Most anti-cancer drugs on the market now, for example, were originally derived from plants or plant products; so, why not try to use plants to target the inflammation or blood supply of fibroids? Might fibroids be a consequence of chronic inflammation within the body? Well, we know that women with fibroids are more likely to eat more beef and ham, and fewer fruits and green vegetables, but whole plant foods don’t just have anti-inflammatory effects but antioxidant effects as well. When the amount of free radicals exceeds the protective effects of antioxidants, oxidative damage will occur, which has been implicated in a variety of disease states, including gynecological conditions, such as fibroids.

If you collect fresh fibroids, as well as normal uterine tissue from hysterectomy surgeries, the fibroid cells have significantly fewer antioxidant enzymes; so, might antioxidant rich foods help? Well, if you drip some strawberries in a petri dish, you can apparently kill of some fibroid tumor cells, while leaving normal uterus cells alone. But, what good does that do us. That’s only relevant if we can show those strawberry compounds get absorbed through our gut and achieve high enough concentrations in uterine tissue. The same with curcumin, the component of the spice turmeric. One of its so-called “miraculous” properties is suppressing the growth of uterine fibroid cells, but again that was just in vitro. Yes, an inhibitory effect was found, and at concentrations that don’t compromise the growth of regular uterine tissue. But, my patients are people, not petri dishes.

I mean, it’s neat to see what happens to human fibroid cells as you drip higher and higher concentrations of green tea compounds on them in a test tube, but I care less about what happens in vitro, or in mice, whether or not they have any clothes on. But there were no randomized, controlled clinical studies until, now, or at least 2013.

Subjects were randomized to green tea extract or placebo for 4 months. In the placebo group, fibroid volume increased 24%. That’s what fibroids do, they continue to grow; however, those randomized to the green tea group showed a reduction in total fibroid volume, and not just by a little, a dramatic decrease—shrunk almost a third–a highly significant difference. OK. But, did the women feel any better? Yes, a dramatic decrease in symptom severity, as well. In the placebo group, nothing much happened month after month, but in those taking the same-looking pill that happened to contain green tea compounds inside, consistent improvement, with women feeling lessening symptoms, each month better than the last. And, with that, an improved health-related quality of life month after month, significantly better than control. And, their blood counts got better too. The blood levels kept decreasing in the placebo group with all that continued excess blood loss every month. But, blood counts reversed in the green tea group. So, anemia significantly improved, because average blood flow significantly diminished. And, all this—the fibroid shrinkage, less pain, better periods— with no adverse effects.

So, not only results comparable to those for the drugs that are commonly used—without the side effects, but comparable results to uterine artery embolization, where they try to cut the blood supply to the fibroid, which is great—unless you accidently cut the blood supply to the rest of the uterus and cause uterine necrosis, one of many reported major complications, which also include death, not only of the fibroid but of the patient and other potential complications that may arise from accidently clogging off non-target arteries. So, a side effect free solution as good as a more invasive procedure is potentially better than in my book. They conclude that green tea compounds show promise as a safe and effective therapeutic agent for women with symptomatic fibroids. Such a simple, inexpensive, and relatively safe therapy could improve women’s health globally.

Now, relatively safe doesn’t mean risk-free. Although there were no liver function abnormalities detected, this was a small study. If you give green tea extract pills to a thousand women for a year, like they did in this breast cancer trial, in about 1 in 17 women, their liver started to get inflamed, a few of which became serious. Now, the dose they used in this study was twice that of the fibroid study; and, it’s not completely clear if the pills were the only cause. But, in general, we should try to avoid extracts and get nutrition in foods as grown, or at least foods as grown dunked in hot water, like green tea. Now, they had to use pills in this study, because they wanted it to be a double-blind study, and it’s hard to create a fake placebo tea that looks, smells, and tastes like the real thing. So, I don’t think we should take green tea extract pills; we should drink green tea. The problem is that the dose they used was like 11 cups a day worth, which would be a lot of caffeine. But, you could choose decaf, and it’s not outside the realm of possibility to drink a couple quarts of tea a day, especially if it’s going to shrink your fibroids so much you can keep your uterus or something. Though, for all we know, five cups of tea would work or three cups or one cup a day—no other dose has been tested. But, you can test it in your own life. If you have fibroids, it couldn’t hurt to add a few cups of green tea to your daily diet and see if you start feeling better.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Kristina DeMuth. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Doctor's Note

More on diet in general in my last video, The Best Diet for Fibroids.

For more remarkable studies on what individual foods can do for women’s health, see:

I have tons of other videos on green tea. And on men’s health, too. See, for example: Preventing Prostate Cancer with Green Tea and Treating Prostate Cancer with Green Tea.

My latest before this was Natural Treatment for Acne and Fungal Infections.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

48 responses to “The Best Food for Fibroids

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  1. If this is your first video, or first week of Nutrition Facts exposure, please do read the doctor’s notes and note all the supporting/relevant videos he lists there. Also note that the archive is fully searchable and that all sources are listed for YOU to be able to read the reports yourself and answer many of your other questions.

    There is no prohibition against discussion of dissenting ideas and positions but please realize that this site is about the nutrition facts as found by the latest research, and OFTEN these things will be somewhat different from mainstream and popular belief and thoughts. Also that facts are subject to change depending upon findings, and that nutritional research is a difficult task for many reasons.

    Most common questions and conflicts on very many subjects have been previously addressed and can be found, along with the supporting studies and discussion if one will simply take a few minutes to look for them.

    We are glad to have you here with open mind and ready palate. WFPB works for so many of us, and works well! We hope to support your transition and create a tide of change. Thanks for stopping in.




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  2. In the video on Lead Contamination of Tea:
    https://nutritionfacts.org/video/lead-contamination-of-tea/#respond
    Dr. G does the math that concludes even 15 cups a day of green tea wouldn’t exceed California’s Prop 65 guidelines for lead.

    I’ve recently noticed that my 2 lb. bag of loose leaf Organic White Tea from India has a Prop 65 warning label on the back. –It seems this tea may be the exception to the rule: “drink as much white or green tea as you want.”. I’ve contacted the company, Tattle Tea, and asked if it was lead or some other contaminant that earned the warning label and for the amounts found, but received only a generic response.

    Does anyone have a recommendation for a nice organic loose leaf white or green tea that is a good value and bears no California cancer warning?




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    1. There is bagged tea without the proposition 65 warning so presumably one can find loose tea without the warning as well. I’ve been drinking Whole Foods brand 365 Organic Green Tea, and it does not have a Prop 65 warning on its packaging.




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    2. D. A. – I found these white and green teas from Touch Organic which sells both bag and loose teas. No California warning label, USDA Organic certified, EcoCertified. I’ve not yet tried it. I found a box of 24 bags (1.7 oz) in my local Big Lots store for $1.80. Here’s the link so you know what it looks like in the event that you are interested:
      http://www.touchorganic.com/quality-1583.html

      Since both green and white teas are rather mild in taste, I sometimes throw a couple of tea bags into my pot of coffee so the good stuff is in there but I still get my coffee in the morning. It may increase the caffeine concentration but I take that into consideration when consuming. I also do the same thing when making iced tea in the summer, especially an iced chai tea. The spiciness of the chai blend is a perfect cover to slip some green or white tea into the mix. For those who have watched William Li, M.D.’s Ted Talk “Can we Eat to Starve Cancer”, we know that there can be food synergy – where one food potentiates the other to produce an even more effective result. This talk convinces me that Dr. Greger is correct in thinking that we can eat, also, to prevent cancer. TedTalk here:
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C_5Z31mUmtc

      What I notice about a lot of this research that Dr. Greger shares with us is that the researchers are attempting to find out what it is in (a) plant(s), exactly, that causes the protection from cancer (or other benefit). I have often seen research done or supported by a pharma company to find “the good thing” and then concentrate it and manufacture it into a pill that they can, then, sell to the public. Beta carotene was one such phytochemical. Researchers had noticed that higher levels of beta carotene in one’s blood resulted in lower lung cancer. So they isolated the phytochemical, put it in a pill, and performed a clinical trial. The result was that they had to stop the trial because those taking the beta carotene started having adverse effects and began dying before the control (those not receiving the beta carotene) group. (Vitamin manufacturers often put beta carotene in their multivitamins – yikes!). This illustrates, again, Dr. Greger’s (and others) contention that there are potentiating effects in whole foods that we just cannot isolate and manufacture into a pill. Same thing happened with curcumin from turmeric. But I like it that the pharmaceutical companies keep performing this research trying to find the magic bullet because it let’s us use this information to further solidify Dr. Greger’s (and other plant-based professionals) advice to eat whole foods.




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      1. You are right BANN! foods have so many nutrients in them that you often can’t get that in a pill. Some labs were tasked to find out why the large doses of beta-carotene didn’t work, particularly in smokers. They concluded two possible reasons.
        1. Vegetables have lots of different carotenoids, more than 150 types as of last I checked. Turned out some of the others, not beta-carotene, particularly gamma, were more effective against cancer cells. So taking that large amount of the beta type prevented the body from metabolizing the gamma and others.
        2. Smokers are generally deficient in other nutrients like vitamin C which probably played into it.
        Bottom line, more is not always better, and few foods have been sufficiently analyzed to know all the nutrients in them.
        I do think some supplements can be helpful, but maybe best taken with the food they occur in. And maybe not every day to allow the body to normalize. This last idea, just my opinion.




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    3. D.A: I have a wholesale account with Frontier Coop. I recently bought three pounds of Frontier Certified Organic White Peony Tea at $19.25/lb. Then I quit caffeine! Frontier won’t buy the tea back, so I thought it was going to go to waste. If you would like to to buy me out, I will sell it to you at cost (plus shipping). It’s a very nice tea that I have consumed numerous pounds of over the years. Email: dfbarbour@gmail.com




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    4. Dr G. just proved with this video that he is almost as singleminded as meat defenders. I used to follow this recommendation to a T (because it had been presented before), and that got me nowhere.
      Simply: you just can’t recommend drinking so many cups of tea a day.
      There are many arguments to support this:
      – it’s simply impossible for a working individual to drink so many cups a day. First I’d have to drink it, then I’d have to go to pee all the time.
      – it’s impossible to adjust the dose (considering how low-quality teas are in my country I can expect anything so I’d have to drink like 30 cups)
      – lead contamination in leaf tea? (considering how low-quality teas are in my country I can expect anything)
      – you have to decide for yourself – either you treat this green tea thing not that seriously (so as a supplementation) or you treat it as a treatment and then you have to take a standarised dose, without lead and then you can observe the reaction of your body (if tumors stopped growing, if you liver enzymes are elevated, if you get any other side effects).
      – Green tea in pills also allows dose escalation and observation of what I wrote above for different doses (and for example if you get high liver enzymes you may lower the dose -> end of problem)
      – With pills: no problem with caffeine. No matter how many pills you have to/need to take.

      So, as I said before, this recommendation of drinking tea and not getting pills got me nowhere. I tried to drink as many as it is possible but that never worked. I kind of felt guilty that I am unable to follow this recommendation and have to take pills. I thought to myself: dr G. must know that it’s better to drink and not to take these pills as there must some other ingredients in whole tea that help even more. Then it hit me: this is not so, and the life got better. I have this very nasty benign tumour on my thyroid. It’s nasty because it is inflamed and it gives me inflammation to the whole throat. But because it’s benign I can’t expect it to be removed as supposedly everyone has them. I will still have to see if green tea helps at least with lowering inflammation.

      PS. If you buy supplements, you usually have to go for EGCG not for green tea extract, as EGCG is more potent, better quality and has lower caffeine content (traces).




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      1. You just can’t eat a cake and have a cake, and that’s what dr G. is trying to do. I know, the intentions are good, but it doesn’t add up. Because it didn’t add up for me, the delay since I found about it to the time I implemented it was about 2 (maybe 3) years. Seriously. In the meantime I tried to find a good brand of tea, bought myself a pot and did a lot of other literature research (trying to asses which of those teas is best for my purposes). I know, this kind of timespan is ridiculous and it almost doesn’t sound like me (I usually arrive at conclusions much much faster) but this idea of drinking was so deeply implanted that I couldn’t free myself from it. That’s why now I have to condemn it even more.




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  3. D.A., I tossed my box of organic white tea after looking into the matter of pesticide contamination http://www.cbc.ca/beta/news/canada/pesticide-traces-in-some-tea-exceed-allowable-limits-1.2564624 and the question of metals contamination https://www.hindawi.com/journals/jt/2013/370460/ In researching the metals contamination, the researchers did suggest avoiding brewing over 3 min or consuming the whole leaf . I suppose exceptions would be for matcha brands that have been reliably tested and publish results. (matcha is prohibitively expensive here, otherwise I would enjoy that ) Adding milk can block the beneficial effects of green tea, so I remain an enthusiastic coffee drinker.




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      1. Thanks for the tip re drinking coffee on an empty stomach D.A. ! I also noted at the hindawi link that you had selected the best in the group with the indian organic white tea – lowest metals contamination all ’round. I will keep it in mind next time I shop. I am not familiar with the warning labels (being from Canada) but I heard they set a very rigorous standard. I may try some of the recipes listed here today too.. all sounds good !




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        1. susan
          only in canada eh? i remember that tea commercial , for tetley tea i think.
          am i the only one that drinks cold brewed tea like was suggested by dr. greger back in 2010 ?




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    1. Thanks for the Hindawi link…that was very informative and interesting. -Like the research that Dr. G sited, they found that White Tea from India had the lowest lead levels -as well as other metals of concern tested-, tied with Green Tea from Sri Lanka. –So curious that the bag I got from India had that warning label. That journal article also made me glad that I’ve switched from brewing in a china tea pot to a glass coffee press. -I hadn’t even thought of the glaze from the tea pot seeping lead.




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    2. Very interesting – thanks for the links.

      The test results used in the CBC report did not show any data for organic teas (or white tea for that matter) and I’d assume/hope that organic teas are low in pesticide contamintion.

      The Hindawi article commented

      “In regard to toxic elements tested only aluminum and lead had levels that were unacceptable. Unacceptable aluminum levels were found in 7% of teas brewed for 3 minutes and 20% of teas brewed for 15 minutes.”

      It showed that that organic white tea generally had low levels of heavy metal contamination compared to other teas and also noted that “Organic white teas had the lowest lead level. Levels ranged from 0.1 μgm/L to 4.39 μgm/L ” It added that “The allowable limit for lead ingestion for adults is 15 μgm daily.” (but 0.5 in pregnancy).

      As an aside, I have seen other research that found that white tea leaves had higher lead contamination than black or green tea leaves. That research using mass spectrometry also found much less heavy metal in the brewed tea “The concentration of As, Cd and Pb in tea leaves were 0.02-0.4 mg kg-1; 0.02-0.09 mg kg-1 and 0.1-3.6 mg kg-1, and the concentration in tea infusions <0.005-0.007mg L-1; < 0.005-0.007 mg L-1 and 0.005-0.015 mg L-1, so there was almost no transfer from tea leaves metal content to infusion."
      http://www.ss-pub.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/BCR2015022701.pdf

      I do not know which technique is more accurate but my feeling is that lead may indeed be a concern if you are drinking several litres of white tea every day but a couple of cups a day (ie half a litre) might not be a problem. I think I'll hang on to my white tea bags.




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  4. I’ve switch from drinking an espresso shot in the morning to an infusion of made from 20 grams of ginger that I pulverize in a pestle and mortar and a bag of organic green tea and brewed in a 16oz stainless steel thermos mug. I still pull the odd double espresso shot, but I feel so much better drinking the green tea, ginger infusion on a regular basis, and it is a very pleasant and soothing beverage to drink.

    I found the following study that suggests that oral ginger intake is at least as affective as NSAIDS for menstrual pain of many causes including fibroids:
    Efficacy of Oral Ginger (Zingiber officinale) for Dysmenorrhea: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4871956/




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  5. Since we’re all divulging our hot drink of choice, here’s what I now do in the a.m.:

    Turmeric (about 1 tsp organic powder)
    Black pepper
    Organic tomato paste
    Fill cup with hot water and stir.

    Maybe I’ll add a bit of moringa powder, maybe some chaga mushroom powder, maybe some maca root powder…whatever sounds intriguing.




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    1. As I male I don’t have any fibroid issues. However, to gain the potential health benefits of green tea I have added the green tea contents of one bag in my smoothie twice a day. So I consumed two bags of green tea daily.

      I recently was scheduled to give blood and was rejected due to moderately low blood iron or hemoglobin. After an exhaustive review of factors it was discovered the anemia was caused by the consumption of tea. Apparently the Tea’s tannates, combine with the iron in my stomach make it less bioavailable.

      One wonders if the pills used in the study included the tea’s tannates?

      I have stopped ingesting the tea until the anemia is resolved and will start incremental green tea consumption in order to find what tea is too much tea.




      1
      1. Hi Bill Weronko, thanks for your comment. I am one of the volunteer at the website. I thought I share a link from Dr Greger video in the past about plant iron rich food and timing of tea consumption. He suggests by eating lots of healthy iron-rich foods, like chickpeas and pumpkin seeds, while consuming vitamin C-rich foods at the same meal, such as citrus, tropical fruits, broccoli, bell peppers, which improve plant iron absorption, while at the same time avoiding drinking tea and coffee with your meals, which can impair iron absorption.
        Risk Associated with Iron Supplements




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        1. Was able to find criteria for hemoglobin, and hemocrit levels Red Cross uses for blood donations. Does anyone know what the ferritin level cut-off is? I understand they check that also now.
          High ferritin levels have been associated with organ damage, and the fact that vegetarians have less heart disease and cancer may be at least partly due to lower ferritin. I’m concerned with people taking iron supplements, especially certain kinds that are very inflammatory.




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      2. Hi Bill
        Dr. Greger does not recommend consumption of green tea leaves unless you can ensure they are from Japan where the lead is not an issue. China has only recently switched to unleaded gasoline so lead is an issue. I would find the source but I am on my iPhone and on the road. I believe I last heard him talk on this when he was interviewed for a talk show in England.

        Hopefully that is enough info to find if Dr. Greger doesn’t see this and comment.




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        1. I am trying to remember the video. I thought Dr. G said matcha from Japan was best but most expensive. Taiwanese was middle ground, and from China was the cheapest but most contaminated.
          John S




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          1. John S., I avoid any foods coming out of China, in fact I avoid their products whenever possible because these guys are always engaged in counterfeit, cheating and disregard for other people welfare for the sake of profits. This has nothing to do with Chinese, in fact I buy stuff from Taiwan and Hong Kong but that commie government is something else. Japanese and Korean goods are the best because they care about quality.




            1
  6. White tea contains about half the EGCG as ordinary green tea.

    Decaffeinated tea (no matter what process is used) contains about half as much EGCG as ordinary caffeinated tea. It turns out that the size of EGCG molecule is very close to that of caffeine, and thus (despite endless fruitless attempts), it is almost impossible to remove caffeine without also removing much of the EGCG.




    1
    1. Do you have any references for this? I just bought a lot of organic “Yoga” brand green tea (decafenated to help with blood pressure). I suppose I could use 2 tea bags to maintain the benefits of green tea.




      1
      1. D.A. Thank you for posting this link. This green vs. white tea video of Dr. Gregor’s is great!
        I think the study that showed white tea less effective, one that was in the media, used water that was so hot it damaged components in the tea. Green and white teas should be brewed at about 175 degrees if I remember correctly.
        Asian people I know don’t strain the tea. They put the leaves in, let them sink, and just keep adding hot water.




        1
        1. My grandparents in the UK didn’t strain their tea either and also used to keep adding hot water (and a pinch of new tea leaves every now and then). That was black tea, though not green. Tea made this way was called stewed tea.

          Of course, they were born in the nineteenth century when tea was expensive and wasn’t to be wasted. Perhaps that is why the Brits developed the habit of drinking strong black tea with milk and sugar. Black tea that has been brewed for a long time in this way is so strong and bitter as to be undrinkable without being cut with something like milk and sugar.




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  7. Bill W. – very interesting. I was curious so I did a quick search. This research has a little more info on the tea-iron binding situation. One option the research offers is to increase the ascorbic acid in the diet (consumed with food I would presume) to enhance the iron absorbtion and to consume the tea separately. The vegetable with the highest Vitamin C content that I’ve been able to find, to date, is yellow and red bell pepper.
    http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/3017/2
    Interesting topic, thanks for bringing it up.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11029010




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  8. Don’t get me wrong, nobody ever disputes the benefits of consuming the whole food and that includes tea. But for therapeutic purpose then a supplement may be needed for the reasons as listed below. Note that the study of the effect of tea on fibroid that Dr G quoted in the video, used tea extract.

    https://labdoor.com/article/green-tea-supplements-vs-drinking-green-tea

    – Tea extract has concentrated amount of polyphenol or catechin which are the main antioxidants. To obtain the same amount as the extract comntains will require to drink a lot of tea and therefore consuming a lot of caffeine.

    – The phytonutrients in tea extract are made more bioavailable

    – Most if not all heavy metals are also removed in the extract

    Not all tea extracts are made equal so one needs to select a good brand.

    Personally, I have not used tea extract because I drink tea all day, like water. But I currently consume a resveratrol supplement which is a very strong antioxidant. To get the same amount of resveratrol from grape, I have to eat the equivalent of 100 cups of grape juice and get a load of sugar that comes along.

    To get the best of everything, consume the whole food along with the supplement, especially if you need to do for therapeutic purpose.




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  9. Thank you so much for making this video Dr.Greger. I am going to start drinking green tea in addition to eliminating dairy and hopefully avoid surgery. I love your podcast too.




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  10. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2016 Jul 26;56(10):1608-19. doi: 10.1080/10408398.2013.781011.
    Bioavailability of Micronutrients from Plant Foods: An Update.

    I would like more videos on food synergies (perhaps a chart) and another update on improving bioavailability of nutrients from foods. Also, could i get help on getting a nutritionally balanced meal plan for the day that hits all the nutritional targets for 2000 Calories? I tried adding info on cronometer for a typical day and I’m falling short in various nutrients (vitamin E, vitamin b2 and zinc). Of course i still have the problem of finding an algae based epa/dha supplement, relying on salt for iodine (approx. 3-4g of added salt, 25-65mcg/g range, avg 40mcg/g), and using both mecobalamin and cyanocobalamin tablets (1000mcg mecobalamin every Mon, Wed, and Fri, and 1000mcg cyanocobalamin on the weekends).




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    1. Arthur, When I use Cronometer, and find a nutrient that I want to consume more of, I type “foods highest in ___” into my search engine. The nutritiondata.self.com site is very comprehensive. It’s a bit time consuming to look through and cluttered with a lots of foods I would never eat. I usually look at wholefoods.com for a more concise list of options. They also outline some information about what the nutrient in question does, it’s shelf life and how cooking effects it.

      I only enter data a few days each quarter now into cronometer, to see how my seasonal food preferences differ nutritionally. The rest of the time I use Dr. G’s Daily Dozen as a guideline with a few additions to address my personal focuses.




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      1. I would eat seaweed but it has b12 analogues that apparently reduce your active b12 absorption. Dr Klaper’s video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IvlaQJImt9w) talks about it at 43:05. He says to space out the timing between your seaweed intake and vit b-12 intake. He says, for example, take a b12 pill on Sunday and eat your seaweed on Wednesday and Thursday. I take a 1000mcg tablet every other day so I can’t space them out. I could go 2500mcg for one week, but what about my father, who’d be better off taking a b-12 pill every day? So i would like to find an iodine supplement but all the ones i find have two issues.

        The first is the consistency of the dose if they’re in liquid form. I’m unsure about it. In pill form they’re found in multi-vitamins and are bundled with extraneous and potentially harmful supplement ingredients. Dr Klaper talks about a multi-vitamin (that you can find at Dr Fuhrman’s website) at 34:03 and what ingredients to avoid. I can’t find a multi-vitamin like that in Australia and it seems rather excessive (and expensive) to order the product online and get it shipped to Australia, and it doesn’t have tga approval afaik (Australian regulation authority on supplements).

        Dr Fuhrman would be better off lowering the cost of his product and his company would quickly gain market share because it’s better and well thought out. Perhaps he’s waiting to pass the baton to a multinational to make it reach mass market. I don’t know. End of rambling.




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  11. Do you have a certain green tea brand you recommend? Would Matcha green tea be a good choice. I’ve read one cup of matcha green tea equals 10 cups of green tea.




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    1. Unfortunately that segment isn’t available today but segment 4 is very interesting to me because of migraine, a genetic neurological brain dysfunction which affects the whole body. Thanks.




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      1. JJ, hope that the video will help you.

        So Western medicine tends to treat the symptoms where the illness is, rather than the source of the problem. So if you have autism or migraine headache, then it’s the brain and you take a brain drug. If you have an indigestion then it’s the stomach and you take a stomach drug. And if it is rheumatism then you take arthritis drug, and so on… But little is known that they may be all related. For instance they can be a gut problem, or an infection, or a mitochondrial issue, etc. that is in a different part of the body. So you may fix your migraine problem by improving the gut, improving the immune system with anti oxidant, repairing the mitochondrial damage, and detoxifying your body, none is related directly to the brain. And you may want to know that healthy fat will help the mitochondrial and the absorption of nutrients.




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    2. These videos are basically “talking heads” without a single reference to studies. People can say whatever they want, but when they don’t let you see the science and draw your own conclusions, that’s a red flag. Nobody should trust anybody just because of a “Dr” or “MD” title. The videos are also very long with little relevant information, which is often incomplete and/or misleading.

      It’s probably better to spend your time learning how to read and interpret studies. Same time investment, much more to gain.




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  12. Hello sir. I am a 22 year old from India. My doctor has been prescribing me Amway nutritional supplements. I would like to know whether these are useful and there is any research regarding this. Thanks!




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    1. Amway,yuk, stay away from it, I mean run away from it as far as you can. Amway is a scam even if they sell you detergent let alone supplement. Supplement is very tricky and there are a lot of good brands but also a lot of bad brands. Unless you live in the U.S. and have a selection of good brands then I think you better off use foods, or otherwise it may be harmful if you buy the wrong synthetic kind.




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  13. Women have this information about green tea for fibroids, thanks to Dr. Greger’s video. There was nothing I could do except have the surgery 15 years ago when my gynecologist referred me to a surgeon. I drink organic green tea grown in Missiones, Argentina.




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