What Are the Best Beverages?

What Are the Best Beverages?
4.57 (91.4%) 86 votes

A review of reviews on the health effects of tea, coffee, milk, wine, and soda.

Discuss
Republish

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

One phrase you’ll hear repeatedly in my videos and books is “best available balance of evidence.” What does that mean? When making decisions as life-or-death important as to what to best feed ourselves and our families, it matters less what a single study says, but rather what the totality of peer-reviewed science has to say.

Individual studies can lead to headlines like this: “Study Finds No Link Between Secondhand Smoke and Cancer.”

To know if there’s really a link between secondhand smoke and lung cancer, it would be better to look at a review or meta-analysis that compiles multiple studies together. The problem is that some reviews say one thing––breathing other people’s tobacco smoke is a cause of lung cancer—and some reviews say another, saying the effects of secondhand smoke are insignificant, and further, such talk may foster “irrational” fears. And, hey, while we’re at it, you can even directly smoke four or five cigarettes a day and not really worry about it; so, light up.

Why do review articles on the health effects reach such different conclusions? Well, as you can imagine, about 90% of reviews written by tobacco industry-affiliated researchers said it was not harmful, whereas you get the opposite number with independent reviews. Reviews written by tobacco researchers had 88 times the odds of concluding secondhand smoke was harmless. It was all part of a deliberate corporate strategy to discredit the science––to, in their words, develop and widely publicize evidence that secondhand smoke is harmless.

Okay, well, can’t you just stick to the independent reviews? The problem is that industry-funded researchers have all sorts of sneaky ways to get out of declaring conflicts of interest. So, it’s hard to follow the money. But, even without knowing who funded what, the majority of reviews still concluded secondhand smoke was harmful. So, just like a single study may not be as helpful as looking at a compilation of studies on a topic, a single review may not be as useful as a compilation of reviews. So, looking at a review of reviews, like this one, can give you a better sense of where the best available balance of evidence may lie. In this case, it’s probably best not to inhale.

Wouldn’t it be cool if there were reviews-of-reviews for different foods? Voilà! An exhaustive review of meta-analyses and systematic reviews on the associations between food and beverage groups and major diet-related chronic diseases. Let’s start with the beverages. The findings were classified into three categories: protective, neutral, or deleterious. First up: tea versus coffee. In both cases, most reviews, for whichever condition they were studying, found both beverages to be protective. But you can see how this supports my recommendation for tea over coffee. Every cup of coffee is a lost opportunity to drink something even healthier: a cup of green tea.

No surprise, soda sinks to the bottom. But still, 14% of reviews mentioned protective effects of drinking soda!? Well, most were references to papers like this: a cross-sectional study that found that 8th grade girls who drank more soda were skinnier than girls who drank less. Okay, but this was just a snapshot in time. What do you think is more likely, that the fatter girls were heavier because they drank less soda, or that they drank less sugary soda because they were heavier? Soda abstention may therefore be a consequence of obesity, rather than a cause, yet it gets marked down as protective; there’s a protective association.

Study design flaws may also account for these wine numbers. This review of reviews was published back in 2014, before the revolution in our understanding of the evaporating health benefits of alcohol, suggesting that the presumed health benefits from “moderate” alcohol may have finally collapsed, thanks, in part, to a systematic error of misclassifying former drinkers as if they were lifelong abstainers, as I revealed in a deep dive in my latest video series on the subject. Sometimes there are unexplainable associations, though. For example, one of the soft drink studies found that increased soda consumption was associated with lower risk of certain types of esophageal cancers.

Don’t tell me—the review was funded by, Coca-Cola? The review was funded by, Coca-Cola! Does that help explain these positive milk studies? Were they all just funded by the dairy council? Even more conflicts of interest have been found among milk studies than soda studies, with industry-funded studies of all such beverages approximately “four to eight times more likely to be favorable to the financial interests of the [study] sponsor….”

Funding bias aside, though, there could be legitimate reasons for the protective effects associated with milk consumption. After all, those who drink more milk as a beverage may drink less soda, which is even worse; so, they come out ahead. But it may be more than just relative benefits. The soda-cancer link seems a little tenuous, not just because of the coke connection, but it’s hard to imagine a biologically plausible mechanism, whereas even something as universally condemned as tobacco isn’t universally bad. As I’ve explored before, more than 50 studies have consistently found a protective association with Parkinson’s, thanks to nicotine. Even secondhand smoke may be protective. Of course, you’d still want to avoid it. It may decrease the risk of Parkinson’s, but increases the risk of an even deadlier brain disease: stroke, not to mention lung cancer and heart disease, which has killed off millions of Americans since the first Surgeon General’s report was released.

Thankfully, by eating certain vegetables, we may be able to get some of the benefits without the risks, and the same may be true of dairy. As I’ve described before, the consumption of milk is associated with increased risk of prostate cancer, leading to recommendations suggesting men may want to cut down or minimize their intake. But milk consumption is associated with decreased colorectal cancer risk. This appears to be a calcium effect. Thankfully, we may be able to get the best of both worlds by eating high-calcium plant foods, such as greens and beans.

What does our review-of-reviews study conclude about such plant-based foods, in comparison to animal-based foods? We’ll find out, next.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Video production by Glass Entertainment

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

One phrase you’ll hear repeatedly in my videos and books is “best available balance of evidence.” What does that mean? When making decisions as life-or-death important as to what to best feed ourselves and our families, it matters less what a single study says, but rather what the totality of peer-reviewed science has to say.

Individual studies can lead to headlines like this: “Study Finds No Link Between Secondhand Smoke and Cancer.”

To know if there’s really a link between secondhand smoke and lung cancer, it would be better to look at a review or meta-analysis that compiles multiple studies together. The problem is that some reviews say one thing––breathing other people’s tobacco smoke is a cause of lung cancer—and some reviews say another, saying the effects of secondhand smoke are insignificant, and further, such talk may foster “irrational” fears. And, hey, while we’re at it, you can even directly smoke four or five cigarettes a day and not really worry about it; so, light up.

Why do review articles on the health effects reach such different conclusions? Well, as you can imagine, about 90% of reviews written by tobacco industry-affiliated researchers said it was not harmful, whereas you get the opposite number with independent reviews. Reviews written by tobacco researchers had 88 times the odds of concluding secondhand smoke was harmless. It was all part of a deliberate corporate strategy to discredit the science––to, in their words, develop and widely publicize evidence that secondhand smoke is harmless.

Okay, well, can’t you just stick to the independent reviews? The problem is that industry-funded researchers have all sorts of sneaky ways to get out of declaring conflicts of interest. So, it’s hard to follow the money. But, even without knowing who funded what, the majority of reviews still concluded secondhand smoke was harmful. So, just like a single study may not be as helpful as looking at a compilation of studies on a topic, a single review may not be as useful as a compilation of reviews. So, looking at a review of reviews, like this one, can give you a better sense of where the best available balance of evidence may lie. In this case, it’s probably best not to inhale.

Wouldn’t it be cool if there were reviews-of-reviews for different foods? Voilà! An exhaustive review of meta-analyses and systematic reviews on the associations between food and beverage groups and major diet-related chronic diseases. Let’s start with the beverages. The findings were classified into three categories: protective, neutral, or deleterious. First up: tea versus coffee. In both cases, most reviews, for whichever condition they were studying, found both beverages to be protective. But you can see how this supports my recommendation for tea over coffee. Every cup of coffee is a lost opportunity to drink something even healthier: a cup of green tea.

No surprise, soda sinks to the bottom. But still, 14% of reviews mentioned protective effects of drinking soda!? Well, most were references to papers like this: a cross-sectional study that found that 8th grade girls who drank more soda were skinnier than girls who drank less. Okay, but this was just a snapshot in time. What do you think is more likely, that the fatter girls were heavier because they drank less soda, or that they drank less sugary soda because they were heavier? Soda abstention may therefore be a consequence of obesity, rather than a cause, yet it gets marked down as protective; there’s a protective association.

Study design flaws may also account for these wine numbers. This review of reviews was published back in 2014, before the revolution in our understanding of the evaporating health benefits of alcohol, suggesting that the presumed health benefits from “moderate” alcohol may have finally collapsed, thanks, in part, to a systematic error of misclassifying former drinkers as if they were lifelong abstainers, as I revealed in a deep dive in my latest video series on the subject. Sometimes there are unexplainable associations, though. For example, one of the soft drink studies found that increased soda consumption was associated with lower risk of certain types of esophageal cancers.

Don’t tell me—the review was funded by, Coca-Cola? The review was funded by, Coca-Cola! Does that help explain these positive milk studies? Were they all just funded by the dairy council? Even more conflicts of interest have been found among milk studies than soda studies, with industry-funded studies of all such beverages approximately “four to eight times more likely to be favorable to the financial interests of the [study] sponsor….”

Funding bias aside, though, there could be legitimate reasons for the protective effects associated with milk consumption. After all, those who drink more milk as a beverage may drink less soda, which is even worse; so, they come out ahead. But it may be more than just relative benefits. The soda-cancer link seems a little tenuous, not just because of the coke connection, but it’s hard to imagine a biologically plausible mechanism, whereas even something as universally condemned as tobacco isn’t universally bad. As I’ve explored before, more than 50 studies have consistently found a protective association with Parkinson’s, thanks to nicotine. Even secondhand smoke may be protective. Of course, you’d still want to avoid it. It may decrease the risk of Parkinson’s, but increases the risk of an even deadlier brain disease: stroke, not to mention lung cancer and heart disease, which has killed off millions of Americans since the first Surgeon General’s report was released.

Thankfully, by eating certain vegetables, we may be able to get some of the benefits without the risks, and the same may be true of dairy. As I’ve described before, the consumption of milk is associated with increased risk of prostate cancer, leading to recommendations suggesting men may want to cut down or minimize their intake. But milk consumption is associated with decreased colorectal cancer risk. This appears to be a calcium effect. Thankfully, we may be able to get the best of both worlds by eating high-calcium plant foods, such as greens and beans.

What does our review-of-reviews study conclude about such plant-based foods, in comparison to animal-based foods? We’ll find out, next.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Video production by Glass Entertainment

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Doctor's Note

Stay tuned for what the exhaustive review of meta-analyses and systematic reviews on major diet-related chronic diseases found for food groups in What Are the Best Foods?

The alcohol video I mentioned was: Is It Better to Drink a Little Alcohol than None at All? and the Parkinson’s video: Pepper’s & Parkinson’s: The Benefits of Smoking Without the Risks? I also mentioned Dairy & Cancer.

What about diet soda? See:

What’s so bad about alcohol? See, for example, Can Alcohol Cause Cancer? and Do Any Benefits of Alcohol Outweigh the Risks?

And I’ve got tons on milk:

My recommendations for the best beverages are water, green tea, and an herbal tea called hibiscus:

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

124 responses to “What Are the Best Beverages?

Comment Etiquette

On NutritionFacts.org, you'll find a vibrant community of nutrition enthusiasts, health professionals, and many knowledgeable users seeking to discover the healthiest diet to eat for themselves and their families. As always, our goal is to foster conversations that are insightful, engaging, and most of all, helpful – from the nutrition beginners to the experts in our community.

To do this we need your help, so here are some basic guidelines to get you started.

The Short List

To help maintain and foster a welcoming atmosphere in our comments, please refrain from rude comments, name-calling, and responding to posts that break the rules (see our full Community Guidelines for more details). We will remove any posts in violation of our rules when we see it, which will, unfortunately, include any nicer comments that may have been made in response.

Be respectful and help out our staff and volunteer health supporters by actively not replying to comments that are breaking the rules. Instead, please flag or report them by submitting a ticket to our help desk. NutritionFacts.org is made up of an incredible staff and many dedicated volunteers that work hard to ensure that the comments section runs smoothly and we spend a great deal of time reading comments from our community members.

Have a correction or suggestion for video or blog? Please contact us to let us know. Submitting a correction this way will result in a quicker fix than commenting on a thread with a suggestion or correction.

View the Full Community Guidelines

  1. Looking at a review of the reviews of the reviews will be coming to a science journal near you.

    It is all about power and influence and money, money, money.

    1. I know the studies and reviews of all of these beverages, including coffee and tea are biased with lots of money at stake, but everyone agrees that water is good for you, so why not stick with water and be safe? Any study or review that finds that a beverage has any chance of being harmful is a red flag.

      1. Marcy,

        Water is good.

        As far as the health risks and benefits, it depends on what the details of the studies are.

        For instance, drinking coffee too close to eating food with zinc can lead vegans to be lower in zinc.

        That is a negative, but it is easily remedied by drinking the coffee a half-hour after those foods.

        If people like coffee and want the benefits, they still can learn the negatives and make the choices based on the bigger picture.

        Water has negative studies and health problem warnings, too, but that just means that you need to know the rules for drinking it.

        Plus,, there are people trying to prove that all of the food WFPB people eat is bad for you. Soy, wheat, carbs, phytates, lectins, nightshades, etc ALL have red flags. .

      2. Marcy, safe water is good, but IMO, safe water plus healthy teas are great.

        I personally add to my pure water green tea/blueberry bags, artichoke blend bags, Guava leaf bags, black tea bags, Linden tea bags, Jiogulan loose tea, hibiscus loose tea, cinnamon tea bags, damiana tea bags… + some others that are out of sight at the moment.

        But even with all those to choose from I still manage to get in 4 or 5 glasses of pure water in a day.

    1. That’s up to you, because it’s a suggested donation not a hard fee. I decided to donate only $10 and that was accepted. It costS time and money to do things and there should be some reward for learning Dr. Greger’s findings on various health issues.
      Other experts do charge hard fees and you can’t have the information without paying up front.

      1. John Nichols, point imo is that NF functions by our donations and book/dvd purchases to begin with, and that includes the very substantial salary that Dr G draws from NF. Nonprofits are big business. So, considering that the research is on our dime to begin with, and these are extraordinary and dangerous times, I take offence at the fee. There is no way to get around the donation page to sign up, so if you do not do purchases over the net you are €%&£ out of luck. Just my opinion.

        1. * I thought an NF volunteer mentioned the webinar would be posted on the site after it was done. If that’s the case, great, that would be helpful.

            1. ‘Timing thing’ ? That decision in the present circumstances, I find immoral.
              Lots of us locally are giving free time to those who need help.

              1. Webinars cost money to set up and run. That’s an extra cost over and above running the site and paying staff etc.

                I never bother with webinars, podcasts etc myself but making say a $1 donation to gain early access to these things if you want to to doesn’t seem unreasonable or immoral to me.

                Given the amount of information already out there from WHO, CDC, McDougall, Fuhrman, PCRM erc, I am not sure why people are obsessing about this.

                1. People are drooling at the mouth,acting as if Dr. G’s webinar will be the final word on what to do about this virus fiasco. How could it be! All his latest research, scientific findings, etc. will be old news only hours later.

                  They’re always finding new info about this beer bug.

                  1. Yes, I don’t quite understand why this is such a big issue. Greger isn’t a specialist in infectious diseases and quite a few WFPB scientists and doctors have already weighed in on this eg Campbell, PCRM, McDougall, Fuhrman etc Consequently, all the angst about Dr Greger’s webinar is perplexing. it’s not like he is going to be able to come up with some magic elixir to prevent/cure this particular virus.

  2. Please reconsider going back to the older style of presentation. Dr. Greger’s physical presence on screen adds little to the information provided, and seems to be more of a distraction, as others have said before.

    Final plea.

    1. Someone came up with a good solution… show him in the opening, then transition to the data. At the end of the video, he comes back on screen to present the ending of the video.

      1. I suppose he could even fade in to a segment where there is no data being shown and only his opinion is being expressed, though I wouldn’t be wild to see that but could stomach it.

    2. Dr Cobalt,

      For this whole quarter, the videos were already made.

      So, the pleas have been heard and I am absolutely certain the issue has been discussed because Dr. Greger showed his own face down here and said that the old format was easier and he asked for feedback.

      He did not pay to have months of videos re-made and I wouldn’t have either.

      1. I think it becomes a bigger issue in topics like this where the topic is studies and statistics which 90% of doctors don’t understand.

        Dr. Greger,

        Any celebrity becomes a target when they put themselves out there. When you aren’t what people are looking at, the target becomes the diet war arguments.

        You are better off not becoming the target because it gives the enemies of WFPB and veganism someone to shoot at and you already are the one taking some of the bullets for that.

        A long time ago, Tom didn’t like the documentary the professionals at Discovery channel put out because it was slick and slick causes people to think they are being sold to. You are a not-for-profit and could be really wealthy right now, but since you are not taking all that money, you have to guard that image. You did the work and have the right to actually take the money, and I am not cynical about you. I am saying, that documentary tried to make WFPB look slick by using the exact camera set ups that major advertisers used – so close to those styles that I, who rarely watched advertizing television recognized the ads. The thing is, ads are associated with selling things and selling things made it look like they were trying to sell something and there was no big bean money scheme presented, so I don’t believe they were trying to sell anything at all, but they probably didn’t even learn that being slick was the opposite image that WFPB needed because WFPB and Vegan have image and trust issues in greater society, so advertising style wasn’t increasing the sense of trust. What does that have to do with you? They actually used you very well in that documentary. So did the other documentaries. You can do this. You just need to know what you are trying to communicate and when you didn’t put yourself in, you communicated as a humble doctor who is promoting WFPB as a movement and who didn’t make it about himself. All the other doctors do their own programs and promoting those and I don’t put them down, but you communicated humble non-profit and you also have consistently been playful entertainer. No matter what you do, putting yourself in with a slicker format will make you look slicker.

    3. Yes, I agree. While Dr. Greger is definitely an entertainer and fun person :), that’s not why I use this sight and support it. It’s one of my sources for unbiased, accurate and scientifically, researched information about food/diet. I read the transcripts rather than watch the video.

      I am also interested in just the “nuts and bolts” rather than the “ins and outs” of scientific research, and for that reason, would appreciate a summarized (“nuts and bolts”) version of the video in the transcript. If nothing changes, I’ll continue to read the transcript, sift through the information, and be grateful for the information I take away. Thanks!

  3. Thanks for caring so passionately about people’s nutritional health!!

    It is a curious recent change that Dr. Greger is now showing up in all videos. Please don’t succumb to seeking fame and notoriety, doctor. It would taint your otherwise pure and refreshing altruistic message of the power of natural plant based diets.

    1. Lynn,

      When I came here, I was curious that Dr. Greger was the only doctor on the whole internet who didn’t show up in any of his videos.

      I figure that when he put out his recent book, they wanted to update the format and put him in for the brand new audience who won’t know who he is (I had no idea who he was when I came here)

      I feel like the software is the problem.

      When I watched him in Chef AJ’s recent webinar, he looked almost angelic with the lighting and the genuine natural way he was interacting. He had the best performance of her series because he wasn’t performing at all. He was just passionate about the subject. He looked so handsome and charismatic there. A few people had talked about him being so distracting because of how handsome he was and THAT is when he is just being his natural charismatic self.

      In these videos, he reminds me of Talking Heads Stop Making Sense video. It is the distance from the camera and the lighting and unnatural background and all sorts of technical things from that software.

      1. Those of you who had heard of Dr. Greger before probably don’t know that when people have never heard of him, it can be disorienting to never have him show his face. I don’t tend to trust videos where the people aren’t ever in them.

        That being said, he now has been in enough videos that he could do years without himself and people will still know whose site this is now.

        That wasn’t true when I came here.

  4. Dr. Greger, I agree with several others here in requesting that you return to the prior format of no humans appearing on the videos. I personally find it to be a distraction, and much prefer the videos that show charts, highlighted parts of articles, foods, etc, rather than you or any other human on screen. By all means, PLEASE keep narrating the videos yourself. You are THE BEST.

    1. Popularity polls are all very well but I wonder what the science says about the effectiveness of the various formats.

      Cognitive psychologists and professionally trained marketing experts can probably point to evidence on this.

      Of course, you would first have to decide on your aim(s) .

      Are they

      1. communicate a message effectively
      2. attract new viewers/visitors to the site
      3. improve credibility
      4. increase site/viewer interactions

      etc etc

      And, if you have more than one, prioritise these aims.

      Relying on site feedback isn’t always the best approach. It’s may not always be he most representative of viewer responses either since life suggests to me that naysayers are always more vocal that than those who are happy with the situation or don’t think it makes a big difference one way or the other. Everybody’s got an opinion and some people are perhaps too generous with sharing their opinions (yes, I am a prime example) but what does the evidence say?

      My suggestion, for what it’s worth, following a policy decision on your aims/priorities, is to get a professional assessment or at least a literature search.by someone who knows what he or she is talking about. Of course, NF.org might already have done this?

  5. I like your new format. You are a talented speaker and share a wealth of valuable information. Thank you and your staff for all you do.

    1. Dr. Greger does look like he’s having fun in this video. I have gotten used to this format, but I do prefer the original, voice only ones.

    1. Hi there, thank you for pointing this out! We double-checked, and the links are actually correct. But they do look off a first glance!

  6. I, personally, am not a big fan of meta-analyses, if they include all studies done on a particular subject. For example, suppose we are living in Europe back in the year 1300 and we looked at all the “equivalents” of a research study at that time on the shape of the Earth. Back then, that would mean looking at what all the “wise”, intellectual people of the day thought about the shape of the Earth. I would guess 90% would say the Earth was flat! The argument here is that when it comes to science, the democratic process doesn’t work too well.

    Rather than look at all research papers, and assuming that we can’t filter out biased ones for the reasons Dr G mentioned, wouldn’t it be better to just pick out the ones that were well-designed and of a rigorous type, ie. not just a correlation.

    The next step would be to compare the results of each study with knowledge from other sources and if any discrepancies are found, try to determine why. A good example would be the case of looking at whether or not cow’s milk, especially from cows who are continually kept pregnant with hormones, is good for adult humans. I’m sure a study can be done comparing drinking milk to drinking whiskey and the milk may come out looking really good! But regardless of what a study might say, knowledge from other sources would indicate to me that cow’s milk is not good for humans to drink, given all other factors being equal.

    The final drawback of meta-analyses for determining if a particular food is healthy or not is the focus on the reductionist approach. The human body is so complex that trying to assess one particular food or drink really has to be viewed in the context of the person’s entire diet. Of course, this is a flaw of many research studies, not just meta-analyses.

    I’m not trying to denigrate Dr Greger’s wonderful work here, but just trying to explain the issues I see with meta-analyses, in general, and suggest ways to improve the process.

    1. Go to the NF homepage. Click the “view all topics” button. Choose your subject of interest. Dr. Greger has done many, many videos covering many, many studies that are not meta-analyses.

      1. Agreed Blair.

        He is approaching it from both directions and I learn a lot from seeing studies, plus reviews plus reviews of reviews and forest plots.

        It gives the big picture.

        The fact that there are such great big diet wars, it helps to acknowledge the other research because that is where the debates come in.

        Darwin,

        I do also like that Dr. Greger does mention when studies are well designed and when he explains P-Value but we live in a society that is doing a tug of war for what the best logic is and nobody trusts anybody and, on many subjects, nobody seems to agree, even in the WFPB movement.

        I agree with the points you made though.

        It just is even looking at coffee, I have sat between groups of researchers arguing both directions and the big picture helps me.

        I can start to get a bigger picture that it can help this one thing and may also cause me to not absorb enough zinc and Dr. Greger going back and forth is making it easier for me because my brain has been watching it all as if it was a very fast ping-pong match and he just gave me something akin to a birds-eye view in stop-motion for me.

    2. Good points but the cranks already accuse people like Dr Greger (and the AHA, WHO, US dietary guidelines etc) of cherry-picking. This would provide additional fuel for those conspiracy theorists.

    3. Meta-analysis shows outlier research that is likely bogus. Truthful research will have multiple peer review models from sources that love to dispute each others work where bogus research will have ones that can be traced to often the same funding source. That is the point.

  7. Hello,

    I have a suggestion for a new research topic, is about going barefoot or with minimalist footwear.
    Is it healthier?

    Thanks.

    1. is about going barefoot or with minimalist footwear.
      Is it healthier?
      ——————————————————————-
      I don’t know about healthier but the minute I enter my house I kick off my kicks and go barefoot.

      In the summer, with no socks… in cold weather, w/socks or house shoes.

  8. Dr. Greger and volunteers are combing through over 2000 articles concerning Covid. He and his volunteers will most likely broaden the net to provide a historical context as well so I think the wait will be worth it. I know I have it on my calendar. In the meantime I would suggest you prepare by reading Dr. Greger’s book, Bird Flu A Virus of Our Own Hatching freely available at: http://www.birdflubook.org/g.php?id=5 and a 2018 Atlantic Monthly article titled, The Next Plague is Coming. Is America Ready also available for free. Points out that the global community has to work together or as the article puts it, “Nous sommes ensemble”. For individual practical steps Dr. John McDougall did a presentation on how he and his wife are handling precautions also available for free on his website. Remember Covid is a novel corona virus and not a novel influenza virus. We lack sufficient testing and science to answer many questions about it. Today’s NF.org video is a terrific overview of the “weight of available scientific evidence” as applied to beverages. Be well and stay tuned, Don Forrester MD FACPE

    1. Loved the Bird Flu book.

      Grateful that he posted it for free online.

      I read it back when coronavirus was just a glint in the eye and it really was helpful.

    2. Hard pass. No amount of WFPB or supplement talk is a viable defense against an virus we still know little about. I work in public health and have access to virologists and public health experts. Comparing the information from them with information from anywhere else, those are the people to listen to.

      1. Reality bites – I just wanted to clarify that Dr. Greger was actually the Director of Public Health at Humane Society of the United States for many years and is an expert on pandemics. He is currently working hard to catch up on the new coronavirus research so he can put out updated information.

  9. The meat industry is basically using the exact same playbook the tobacco industry used to defend itself when confronted with studies showing the harmful effects of its product. This leaves the average person confused even though the science is clear.

    1. Indeed, Sidney. Same with the dairy and egg industries. They’re like a mob, too. I think they shut down the company Hampton Creek who made the insanely good Just Mayo products (tasted just like the best mayonnaise you could ever have but was totally vegan)… that was courtesy of the altruistic egg industry. And now the ever so caring dairy industry is going after Miyoko’s creamery. Miyoko’s is this awesome woman who loved high end cheeses and all that but went vegan for the animals and made an entire line of some of the most incredible dairy alternative products ever. They’re not WFPB, but they’re much healthier than others on the market such as her vegan butter and vegan cream cheese and her cheese wheels and now dips. The only negative in her stuff is that it has coconut oil (not in all of it though, I think the cream cheese didn’t) like all vegan butters and things like that, but it’s all 100% palm oil free which is so cool for health and ethics due to animal cruelty via palm oil and the horrific environmental devastation. And cashews are used, too, so unlike other stuff, it isn’t just pure oils making up the creamy goodness. I don’t eat it regularly, but it’s very nice to have available for holidays. ….That was quite a tangent lol.

      1. S- I agree completely about the Just Mayo! I used to buy it in the cold section, then they had one on the warm (regular ) grocery shelves, but it was not near a good. I looked high and low for that cold version but found out they were gone for good…. stores kept telling me they were back ordered… oh well. If I need Mayo for something and don’t have time to make it I use Fabenaise from Sir Kensington- but rarely!

        1. Same, I don’t use mayo (I did use their mayo before going WFPB) but it was great to have around for those rare occasions and a much better alternative for people who do. I liked the warm shelved kind a lot, I never got around to trying their other flavors, but they were expanding—I heard their “Just Ranch” was amazing. I really hope their company comes back, I can’t stand the piece of crap mob animal ag industry… just thoroughly sickening in every way one could aspire to imagine.

    2. Sidney sadly all of the industries can not be trusted. How many ‘natural’ products have already been pulled off the market because they either had unlisted ingredients or none of the listed ingredient in them? Countless. Yet all of these companies claim to ‘test their raw materials’ and have used that argument to fight past legislation. They claim self policing works when is hasn’t in any other industry.

  10. I love Dr Greger and the work he is doing.
    However, these new videos highlighting him rather than the papers are not as effective as his previous work. I can not use them in my university nutrition classes because the students roll their eyes in frustration, and get on their phones. They watch the earlier videos closely.
    Please – return to less motion and longer screen time for the evidence. Your work is so worth watching!
    Thanks!

    1. That is interesting, Ann. I wonder why they react that way… maybe because it makes them feel less actively learning from viewing the charts, etc. and more like they’re being lectured which some like and others don’t. But I would seriously not allow phones out in your class, that would piss me off to high hell.

    1. YR, That sounds like a good idea to me. And the article gives a good explanation of the “supply chain’ dynamics that most people are not aware of. And with a lot of people working at home now, more people are eating at home! Which is good, in a way, because they could eat more healthily, but it certainly disrupts the supply chain dynamics.

    2. Gov. Abbot may have lost the use of his legs (a tree fell on him while jogging when he was a young man… seriously) but his brain works quite well. He has released untold amounts of supplies to hospitals from the State’s emergency preparedness stores… and ordered beaucoup more supplies.

      The State of Texas has a Rainy Day Fund that has built up over the years, so there shouldn’t be any deficit once this is over.

    3. YR,

      That is great.

      Good to see some creativity in the process.

      It will help.

      Yesterday, I was watching how the local hospitals around me have retrofitted their ventilators so that each ventilator can serve 2 people.

      Plus, people are making face masks and bringing them to the hospitals.

  11. A friend just posted a woman’s post of a picture of a man leaning over the hood of his car with a police officer patting him down for any hidden weapons. Across the top of the picture read the caption “Man arrested for crack paraphernalia.”

    On the hood of his car were six rolls of toilet paper. ‘-)

      1. toilet paper rolls over or under
        ——————————————-
        So how do you describe when the TP is on a stick, vertically? ‘-)

        I suppose “none of the above” ‘-)

      2. Over or under:

        The way I see it is
        You have to figure out
        If you are going to be
        Over the top and over
        Or next to the wall
        And under

    1. I hear the the toilet paper shortage is so bad that some people are now using lettuce leaves instead.

      I reckon that’s just the tip of the iceberg.

      1. some people are now using lettuce leaves instead.

        I reckon that’s just the tip of the iceberg.
        —————————————————————–
        groahnnnnnnnn… (winces and does face palm. ‘-)

  12. Due to all the bad science out there from legitimately corrupted research to simply poorly put together studies, I really don’t like this gathering of the published data and putting it into this kind of perspective. To me, it’s very sloppy because of the reasons I said before. It’s much more helpful to actually keep up with the quality data and discriminate against the obvious frauds and flimsy studies. Difficult to do for anyone let alone the general public, yet Dr. Greger helps make this possible and that is incredible work.

  13. Below are the opening remarks for the accompanying link. Maybe it is still too soon to start thinking how our world has and will change, but for me it is always good to get thinkers’ viewpoints on what is to come. About the authors:

    Carin Ism is the co-founder of the Future of Governance Agency (FOGA) and co-author of “How to Rule a World—A Guide to the Established and Emerging Tools for Power and Governance in the 21st century” to be released in 2020. …

    Julien Leyre is a French-Australian writer, educator, and governance innovator. Together with Carin Ism, Leyre is co-author of the upcoming book “How to Rule a World: A Guide to the Established and Emerging Tools for Power and Governance in the 21st Century” and co-founder of FOGA. Leyre is the COO of Australian power company reVolt,
    ————————————————————

    Crisis. A situation where danger and opportunity intersect. In the last several weeks, we’ve heard and learned a lot about the danger and suffering caused by Covid-19. But opportunities are here too, and not only for soap producers and bitcoin holders. This is not to downplay the gravity of the situation, but rather go back to the root of the word crisis, and its original meaning of “choice.” This brutal challenge to our existing systems may open new windows of opportunity for long-awaited change.

    Here’s a list of 16 positive changes to the collective mindset this era of emergency may bring.

    https://singularityhub.com/2020/03/25/16-ways-coronavirus-may-change-the-way-we-look-at-the-world/

    1. Good link, Lonie. There’s more going on behind the scenes than most people are aware of. We shall see if good days are indeed coming once we get through this.

      I too have heard rumblings of “no internet” for a while. From more than one source. The whole world is dependent on Big Tech! :-(

      Meanwhile, it’s suggested that now is not a good time to start an intermittent fast:

      https://www.yahoo.com/news/intermittent-fasting-may-bad-idea-175000951.html

      1. Good link, Lonie.
        ————————–
        Thanks YR, Your link as well. Except for one of the side ads that says “This device will cut your energy bills in half.” That is a scam according to the posts below it. I tried to google the company and couldn’t find anything. Apparently Yahoo will allow any ads for a buck.

        1. I agree Yahoo can suck. It’s only one of my four email addresses. (Hell, all their Home Page’s have failings.)\

          Yesterday I couldn’t send any emails from Yahoo!mail, for instance. All is well now, however.

  14. Any chance that Dr. Greger might publish a quick summary of what variations to Daily Dozen might possibly strengthen immunity to viruses? Minimizing one’s chances of being exposed to the COVID virus is obviously the most important action but given its high transmissibility I’m assuming there’s a high probability of contracting it in the next 12 months.

    I’ve been adding an extra tablespoon of nutritional yeast to my daily intake based on Dr. Greger’s video about improving athlete’s resistance to colds. I realize it’s just a shot in the dark but who knows it might help and almost certainly won’t hurt.

    I’m happy to sign up for the webinar. However, that’s 2 weeks from now. As of today the U.S. is reporting 63,575 cases and the recent doubling rate has been 2 to 3 days. In 2 weeks, the total will exceed a million cases if that rate continues. A couple of paragraphs from Dr. Greger on things worth trying would not be amiss.

      1. Thanks, Barb. The interview with Dr. Malhotra is quite good — and hopeful news for those of us who’ve been practicing WFPB

      2. That is surprisingly sensible advice given that Malhotra has been a cholesterol and saturated fat ‘sceptic’ for a long time
        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aseem_Malhotra

        Plant Positive even did some videos about Malhotra’s claims back in 2014
        http://plantpositive.com/display/Search?moduleId=19496100&searchQuery=malhotra

        The guy is articulate telegenic and charming but he is also a dangerous crank
        https://velvetgloveironfist.blogspot.com/2018/09/the-martyrdom-of-aseem-malhotra.html

        1. Thanks Fumbles! Malhotra is not a familiar name to me since I don’t follow the low carb crowd. I only posted the video because he summarized in 7 minutes the same points I had read at various government info sites. Also, he mentioned what Lonie and I discussed weeks ago. Western society in general is not in good physical condition. All the more reason to take every warning about sanitizing, and social distancing very seriously.
          Fruit and veg, sleep, exercise and fresh air… we can do this.

    1. YR,

      My problem is that we are in the middle of a pandemic and people are dying and the concept that the vegan doctors are all these immature people and people like Jeff are as immature as the young people doing the same YouTube drama process is not very comforting.

      The thing about moments in history with things like pandemics, heroic people of society are calming people down and helping them to mobilize, and self-centered egomaniacal people are riling people up in a self-aggrandizing way.

      The only thing I do know about Jeff Nelson is that he doesn’t fight fair and he likes to rile people up.

      But that is like a virus.

      Honestly, the vegan doctors all need to separate and socially isolate and not bring the Whole Food Plant-Based movement down now.

      1. I never did see it as a ‘plant based movement’. I see individual book authors/ sellers interested in promoting their own branding or viewpoint.

        1. Re Nelson versus Fuhrman, I just watched Fuhrman’s response to Nelson’s accusations about DHA supplementation
          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qS1Pp4pxvU8

          I found it pretty convincing but I now understand that Klaper has flipped his position once again back to a ‘no DHA supplementation stance’ though
          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0kvFvsnGUqo&t=2s

          It is perhaps worth adding that Dr Fuhrman’s recommendations, unlike Nelson’s, are consistent with the findings of the World Health Organization and the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization (see p31 of the PDF)

          ‘For adult males and non-pregnant/non-lactating adult females 0.250g/day of EPA plus DHA is recommended, with insufficient evidence to set a specific minimum intake of either EPA or DHA alone; both should be consumed. For adult pregnant and lactating females, the minimum intake for optimal adult health and fetal and infant development is 0.3 g/d EPA+DHA, of which at least 0.2 g/d should be DHA.’
          http://www.fao.org/3/a-i1953e.pdf

          I am continuing to supplement.

  15. If predictions are true that the internet may go down (soon!) for a while, Dr. G. may not be doing the webinar anyway!

  16. what do we do when we cant get green leafy vegetables!? Please address how we stay healthy when we are living in quarantine off of rice and beans.

    1. TR,

      Grocery stores deliver.

      Plus, if you order in some things like broccoli sprouts or micro greens they only take days before you can eat them.

      Broccoli sprouts are healthiest after 2 days growing. Micro greens 5 to 7 days.

      Spices and tea adds in lots of benefits.

      But a few weeks on just rice and beans or potatoes won’t cause damage.

    2. TR,
      I put canned spinach in my stew cooking recently. Dr. Greger has done a video showing that canned veggies have a good nutrition value.

  17. TR, I thought about this a couple of months ago before we were in lock-down in our area. I decided that since people have lived off a diet of potatoes for months at a time and did very well, I wasn’t going to worry too much. That said, I did purchase some frozen mixed veg with
    broccoli and cauliflower, frozen brussel sprouts and spinach to have on hand. I also froze servings of soups and bean dishes with spinach and kale swirled through them. If I run out of that, I will make a jug of cold brew green tea and be grateful I have something to eat. This too shall pass.

    1. That’s basically what I have done also. However, unfortunately, we too shall pass. From a purely selfish perspective, therefore, I have never found the ‘this too shall pass’ saying much comfort…………… but then stressing about these things only makes them worse.

      1. haha Fumbles, you’re so funny! Yes, we too shall pass, and having already ‘been there done that’ albeit momentarily, I can say it’s not the worst thing that can happen. …. but then, neither is living without leafy greens for a month or so.
        Here I could probably go out and forage if things got desperate. It’s spring and new dandelions and nettles will be poppling up.

    2. Barb thank you for always replying. I guess I should have been more specific… I know there have been several videos on things like blue green algae, chlorella, dried seaweed. In a tight situation were to walk a few blocks further than my barren grocery store to the ‘health’ food store what would be a smart and effective purchase to to a bit more than nothing. I live in a city, no garden, and the city I live in is a recovering city in Eastern Europe. My fridge is tiny and my freezer is a drawer that holds 2 stacked small ice cube trays. I live in a little under 40sq m. Broccoli sprouts and kale are not sold in any stores around me. Lettuce is sold in very small packages. I am sure some one reading this who also lives in my part of the world is chuckling at the truth of what our homes, single burner kitchens, small fridges and post communist buildings and their ‘yards’ look like. We do our best but some of the suggestions made here are lovely *albeit obvious” are not an option. Amazon.(country) doesn’t exist in my country. Delivery is a luxury of the places I watch on television. We do our best here, we eat cabbage – those are the greens. <3 we do our best, we do our best.

      1. TR, thanks so much for your comments. It really helps to deepen our understanding to hear how people are managing in these times. Our thoughts and prayers are with you.

        I myself live very modestly TR. I have given this thought during these past months. I said to Lonie last week that my goal is not to maintain my lifestyle through this, but to eat most days and keep a roof over my head. That is where I am at.

        I did consider the greens question, and figured green tea, or any tea really, is maybe one of the best, easiest to come by, cheapest leafy green substance out there in a pinch. (our stores are looking barren too). I thought about chlorella, but before everyone else had lol. The Irish got by on cabbage and potatoes and did well. I don’t know what time frame we are looking at, but I suspect supplies will ebb and flow before becoming more stable.

        Perhaps someone else has a better suggestion for the greens question. All the best to you TR

      2. TR,

        Thanks for sharing. It benefits this community to hear about the world situation.

        If you can’t get seeds, and can’t get tea, you can still do well for a few months on rice and beans or potatoes.

        Spices, grains, and cacao would be the next things on my list. Oatmeal.

        Do you have farms near you? We are a few months away from farmer’s markets here, but that is coming quickly. We often run short of fresh organic produce where I live during the Winter. We generally always have frozen vegetables and canned vegetables available and we do have delivery services, so we are spoiled, like crazy.

        Maybe you could can your own in the future? That is what my older relatives used to do. Canning them or dehydrating them are ways they used to extend shelf-life before they had electricity and refrigeration.

        I am praying for you.

        I watch a video for a missions where they bring food to people in other countries and many people all over the world just eat potatoes. They will keep you out of deficiency.

      3. TR, I’m so sorry to hear that. If it’s any consolation at all, your living off of rice and beans whether by any kind of a choice or strictly out of necessity, is nutritionally healthier than the way many of the westernized world–with all the options at their fingertips–choose to eat out of either choice, ignorance or a bit of both. You obviously have it very hard and I wish you had all the availabilities I’m used to–you deserve to–but health wise you may actually be ahead of game in spite of it.

  18. N O T E :

    Live Q&A with Dr Greger is 12 noon today ET facebookand at 1pm today ET YouTube
    Most probably answer covid19 questions from WFPB perspective.

    1. Ruthie,

      Yes, he got passionate about it.

      It was fun listening to him.

      He really is a good teacher.

      I have been watching so many doctors talk about these topics every single day and he simplifies topics and he adds in passion. I didn’t even know that the other doctors didn’t add in passion until Dr. Greger opened his mouth.

  19. I just watched Dr. Greger’s Live Q&A and have an issue with the one show (or whatever it was) he mentioned, where a man is showing people how to prepare healthy recipes strictly with shelf-stable foods. I mean it’s a cool idea, but it plays into the whole severe issue of people panic buying and I really think it’s an irresponsible idea given the situation at this time and the disappointing way the public has been handling it bringing mothers and nurses to tears begging people to stop hoarding. We can go to stores and get things when we need them, we just need to take the rational precautions we’re all being told to do. That way, we all keep the virus at bay as much as possible and everyone can get what they need to care for themselves and their loved ones. Simply do what they say… don’t hang out in large crowds, cough (if you should need to) in your elbow, keep a good distance between yourself and others, don’t touch your face and all those very practical things. People can’t afford to stockpile and there isn’t enough for everyone to do so, either. We’re all in this together and hoarding all the shelf stable foods, cleaning and hygiene products is not only irrational and unnecessary, but it’s extremely selfish, greedy and downright CRUEL to do to others who have no way of feeding their family, wiping their baby’s bottom, disinfecting surfaces for themselves and their loved ones, and so on… because some take it upon themselves to barricade themselves with a years supply of necessities for everyone. Shame on the public who don’t think about others. Buy what you need, others need things to, leave some for everyone like normal. Take the necessary precautions they tell you about for yourself and others. That’s it. We do the best we can for EVERYONE.

    1. Also people really need to start keeping in mind that they only have one character. Maybe the whole point of going through life is to go through all the unpredictabilities and build a character worth having regardless of them.

      1. S,

        People can’t hoard or prep now and haven’t been able to for weeks. Stores across the board have been posting limits on the things people over-bought.

        That being said, people have been prepping for decades and those are the people who were ready for this and they will be ready if the economy collapses and for anything. They are people we can learn from. We don’t have to look down on them. This has to become part of the collective learning experience.

        Dr. Greger, in his pandemic talk of 2008 said to people to stock up on things like toilet paper because situations like this will happen.

        I highly suspect that people who haven’t seen rolls of toilet paper for weeks will over-buy when their turn comes but eventually it will stabilize.

        I heard that people flushing t-shirt materials caused a major problem in the pipes someplace.

        And, no, I didn’t do panic buying, partly because I was watching this coming since November and had plenty of time to prep buy and now, I am still prep buying, but within the guidelines of what is available.

        Everything except toilet paper and Kleenex does seem to be slowly coming back.

        What I learned from this pandemic is that I prepared and sheltered in place so early that I found out that I didn’t know when to start sheltering in place and didn’t know how much of everything I would need to be able to self-isolate for a whole month or more.

        I am entering a deeper part of that self-quarantining process now because so many people in my town already have it and someone I have interacted with – though from a 6 feet distance – just tested positive, so I won’t be going to the store for a month or two now and that is what we needed to be prepared for. We needed a months worth of toilet paper and food minimum. Some elderly people needed 2 or 3 months worth of supplies. They can’t afford to risk going anywhere. My cousin is one of those.

        I say it because some people have 6 kids and can’t exist even a week on a 4-pack of toilet paper. Those real situations is why the hoarding happened.

        It was more about needing to stay away from stores and about having big families.

        Also, about mental health issues and panic, in general.

        I do have enough toilet paper for the next month and enough food and I have a weeks worth of salad, so I will probably have to go 3 weeks without any. 4 weeks if I get symptoms.

        Either way, I just know that the stores needed policies to prevent what originally happened, but the stores also needed to see the pandemic coming from a distance and they needed to be prepared. They are now.

        Now, they have plexiglass to put up between them and the customers. They chalked or taped marks every six feet and put up quantity limited signs on products they are short in.

        As far as the program by Jeff Novack, he is dealing with how people can eat if they have to use things from the shelves and I watched it and I don’t think it was about hoarding at all. It was about various things to try, so that if one type of product wasn’t available, they could try another.

        It was interesting to me. I don’t eat many of the things he put up and I found it good to learn from. I am still probably leaning toward the prepper process, once things are back on the shelves, but I won’t be emptying shelves or even going shopping right now.

        1. I was self-isolating since about the New Year watching this.

          I needed 4 months of toilet paper if I wanted to stay out of the stores and not get exposed.

          What I learned was that it was easy to not use the food and supplies up the first few months, but I didn’t have a concept that the products would be running out in March or that it would be even more important to be prepared to stay out of the stores in March and April. I don’t know what May will be like.

        2. Deb,

          I could not read past your first statement because that is absolutely not true.

          Never in my entire existence on this planet has there been, in this country, a shortage of toilet paper, essential cleaning and at home medical care, basic foods, etc. You are wrong.

          Never have nurses publicly pled, crying and begging people to stop panic buying because while they’re on the front lines, they can’t even get basic cleaning supplies to keep themselves and their own families safe.

          Never have companies needed to grow extra crops to ensure future products over public hoarding.

          Never has the president had to explain to people that there is enough for everyone and tell people to stop hoarding because of how much suffering it was causing.

          Never have stores had to start setting limits on products purchased to try and police an epidemic of its own.

          It is a disgraceful and completely selfish act to do so in times like these. We are supposed to be in this together which is the only way to handle this so things do not crash and everyone CAN take care of themselves and loved ones.

          The disgraceful way so much of the population has handled this, created a serious epidemic of its own which had no reason to be there. And it has made this pandemic SO much worse, less safe, harder to deal with properly, and more stressful. So there is every reason to shame and look down on the people who caused this with their irrationality, greed, and selfish behavior.

          These are not the people who would survive a situation, these are the people who make sure others CAN’T.

  20. Dr. Greger,

    Looking forward to “How Not to Die in a Pandemic” book.

    I liked the bird flu book.

    Wish it was out now, while I will be self-quarantining at a higher level.

    I do have a fancy-dancy N100 respirator mask. It has leather in it and that surprised me.

    But I have been exposed now for sure, so I will not be going out and I tried to do the math, but there is no way it will be better two weeks from now. I think it has to be until there stops being new cases in my area.

    If you are writing your book, when do we start and when do we stop staying home is a good topic.

    I was talking to someone today who said that their granddaughter had the symptoms back in November when it was being discovered in China. My guess is that if I was 90, November was when to start.

    I am looking forward to the Webinar.

  21. Hi, I have a comment/question about several things I’ve heard and seen on this website, as well as known for a long time now, about plant-based oils/fats.
    To start, I believe I read most of the transcripts regarding plant oils and fats, and, for example, coconut oil was the central topic in many of them.
    I won’t get too into it, but I’m vegan and I eat as little plant oils as possible, when avoidable.
    However, in a couple of transcripts I’ve read here, plant oils almost seemed to be put neck in neck/ up there with animal oils/fats. It may just be the way it was written/ how I interpreted it when I read this initially, but my understanding and research has always pointed to the fact that, while hydrogenated/ refined plant oils (like refined coconut oil) are indeed refined and contain saturated fat/ are really just a source of nutrition -less fat, they aren’t sitting in “exactly“ the same spot as animal-based oils/ fats, or tallow, etc., because there is such a difference based on the fact that, being that these come from an animal, they may be similarly high in fat, but coconut oil and other plant fats don’t cause the same kind of inflammation response as animal ones do, or the same instantaneous igf1/insulin raising, hormonally disruptive, chemically stimulating, kidney/organ filtration-altering (to name a few) responses as animal fats and oils do. (Just like animal protein/secretions obviously do)
    The other transcripts seemed to intentionally add that/ to remind the reader that while plant/animal oils and fats are similarly fatty in a “we may have the same level of fats” way, they aren’t the same kind of fat, and their differences are complex and have different implications/create different responses and problems in the human body once consumed.
    Obviously, human bodies aren’t equipped or meant to handle any animal products- so, in the transcripts, when things went from placing the two types of fats/oils on the same level/ even saying one or two times that plant oils could be worse because of their saturated fat levels in refined/hydrogenated ones, to then in most transcripts reminding the reader of what I mentioned above, it led me to the conclusion that
    the author/authors were simply comparing and aligning the two only* based just on the basic premise of the amount of fat/saturated fats were in each type of oil/fat that were used as examples, from the plant-based and animal-based group.
    Just leaving this here because I had a weird moment where I was like “I need to know there’s validation to what I think/know”.
    So I’m good, but I hope to hear from someone in the community soon! ☺️

    1. Hi Amelia,

      Personally I don’t compare coconut oil and animal fats. That is, I think of *coconut* oil (sometimes MCT versions of coconut oil is mixed with Palm Oil which may have the same carbon numbers… C-8, C10, or C12) as its own type of oil. Many of the objections to *coconut* oil is due to the Palm Oil association… the palm oil coming from plantations that are turning jungle into palm tree farms.

      Many oil sellers are taking this objection into account and are selling only the coconut oil versions.

      As for what is known about coconut oil I’ll pass along mostly what I know about the MCT version of the oil… that is, the C8, C10, and C12.

      Most MCT (Medium Chain Triglycerides) versions are the ones touted more for their health properties I think. But usually those are primarily the C8 and C10 components. The C-12 is thought to be a borderline MCT but has as its redeeming quality a high degree of antibiotic action. It is possible to buy the Lauric Acid C12 version to use for this purpose.

      I don’t consume coconut oil directly but since it has the Lauric Acid in it, I sometimes use it for its antibiotic properties. Once that included meats when I was eating and cooking those. I would put any left-over meat into a glass jar and pour some coconut oil over it. The coconut oil wouldn’t freeze and burst the jar like water or some other liquid might. When it came time to eat the meat, I would let the coconut oil go back to a liquid state, remove the meat and reheat.

      But those days have passed for me, and now I only buy MCT oil. My last purchase was a C-8 from coconuts-only version. This particular oil is more expensive and is very thin… that’s probably why the oil is more intense in how it reacts (it is recommeded one starts with a tsp and build up to tbsps over time.) I use much less of it than I do the C8 + C10 versions that are cheaper and more popular.

      As for oil being a no-no… if you buy products that normally contain oil, buy something that is oil-free and add a little MCT oil to it. ‘-)

      Why do I use any MCT oil product? Because as we age, our normal brain fuel of glucose no longer provides all of the brain with the fuel it needs. But it turns out that ketones (made from MCT oil is one source) fill in the gaps when it it becomes the brain’s fuel source. And it becomes fuel quicker than glucose which goes through a gut conversion of starches (carbs) whereas an MCT oil is transformed immediately by the liver into fuel.

      Hope this helps… I awoke early and needed something to jump start my brain, so happy to go into detail for you.

      1. Forgot to mention that coconut oil is great if you have to run to a store or something and don’t have time to shower or bathe. But like once when I went into a business and the lady behind the counter said that when I came in, she suddenly became hungry. ‘-)

        And speaking of hunger, don’t be afraid of coconut flakes. They act as an insoluble fiber that can produce short chain fatty acids, plus numerable minerals.

    2. It’s a complex issue but one consideration is that it appears that all oils may adversely affect endothelial function. The study that raised this possibility only looked at three oils (prepared in different ways) but it would be a brave assumption that this or that oil doesn’t affect our arteries simply because it wasn’t tested and specifically shown to be harmful.
      https://www.nmcd-journal.com/article/S0939-4753%2805%2900213-9/fulltext

      That said, I do take a DHA oil supplement as recommended by Dr Greger
      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/should-vegans-take-dha-to-preserve-brain-function/

      Note though Dr G recommends only 250mg daily of DHA/EPA. This compares with 60mL of oil in the first study … or about 57 grammes, ie a very much larger dose.

      Incidentally, the WHO/FAO also state that (p31 of the PDF)

      ‘For adult males and non-pregnant/non-lactating adult females 0.250g/day of EPA plus DHA is recommended, with insufficient evidence to set a specific
      minimum intake of either EPA or DHA alone; both should be consumed. For adult pregnant and lactating females, the minimum intake for optimal adult health and fetal and infant development is 0.3 g/d EPA+DHA, of which at least 0.2 g/d should be DHA.’
      http://www.fao.org/3/a-i1953e.pdf

      I haven’t seen any evidence about MCT oil

    3. Sometimes I think we make things more complicated than they need to be. Because research studies may study all saturated fats and lump animal and plant-based ones together, we’d like to think that all animal fats would come out better in terms of whatever health variable is being measured. In some cases some animal fats may come out looking slightly better than those rare plant-based saturated fats, but that shouldn’t throw off our understanding that plant-based foods including fats aren’t generally healthier. Do we want to opt for the weakest link on the plant based foods, though? Of course not, nor would we want to grab for the animal-based fats that might, in some studies, appear slightly better compared to the saturated fats of say coconut oil.
      I understand this does not really give a scientific explanation for you, but you requested validation for this seemingly contradiction and I thought I’d explain how I’ve resolved it in my own mind. Some fats are less healthy, usually animal based and should be avoided, but there are a few exceptional plant-based ones that also need to be avoided..

  22. I love these videos. One of the very few places where I can get straight information. Not what I WANT to hear – Just what IS.

  23. So in a recent Q&A video someone asked about Wim Hof method breathing and Dr Greger said he didn’t know anything about it & send him references. I didn’t ask the question, but I think the PNAS paper should be read by all doctors – it’s that important. I can’ figure out how to send Dr Greger the link, so here it is, maybe a moderator can send it to him:
    https://www.pnas.org/content/111/20/7379.long

  24. Awesome content as usual! Would it be possible to decrease the volume of the intro sequence? It seems much louder than Dr Greger’s presentation in the rest of the video.
    Thanks

  25. I have started a course on nutrition however I would love to know what the best plant based nutrition courses there are to do? I am based in the UK and looking to do this online over coming months

  26. I like green tea as a hot beverage. There are times, however, I want to have a cold beverage, especially when the meal is hot and spicy. I am aware that Dr. Gregger does not recommend alcoholic beverages. Is alcohol-free beer a good drink? Fruit juices, like orange juice, are nice drinks but not as interesting as a (non-alcoholic) beer. Lemonade does not quite do it. I have found one particular non-alcoholic beer that comes to regular beer in oomph. There are some alcohol-free wines also, but they don’t have the wine-effect. So, I would like to ask if non-alcohol beer figures among recommended beverages. Thank you.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This